SAMMI

Safely Administering Medications and Managing Interruptions Pilot (SAMMI-P): a clustered randomised controlled trial

The rates of medication incidents within the acute care environment have raised international and national concerns for patient safety. Despite various efforts to enhance patient safety through reporting, evaluating and preventing medication errors, the prevalence of adverse patient outcomes associated with medication errors remains unacceptably high (World Health Organisation, 2012).

Adverse medication incidents extend the duration of stay of inpatients and increase recovery time (Santell, Hicks, McMeekin, & Cousins, 2003) through failures to initiate medications or less than therapeutic medication regimens, or administering incorrect medications that cause harm.

The aim of this study is to develop and pilot test an intervention to improve nurses' abilities to manage interruptions during the administration of medications, thereby reducing medication errors and, potentially, patient's length of stay.

Specifically the study aims to determine whether:

  • Interruptions were reduced on wards where nurses participated in an education program and simulation experience compared to wards where nurses have not participated in an education program and simulation intervention.
  • Medication errors were reduced on wards where nurses have participated in an education program and simulation intervention to manage interruptions, compared with wards where nurses have not participated in an education program and simulation experience.

Funding:

Nursing & Midwifery Strategy Reserve Funding: $65,400 (2015-2016).

Project Team:

Johnson, M. (ACU); Everett, B. (CANR); Manias, E. (Deakin); Levett-Jones, T. (UoN); Weidemann, G. (Western Sydney University); Langdon, R. (CANR); Thornton, A. (Liverpool Hospital, SWSLHD); Aguilar, V. (CEWD, SWSLHD); Blay, N.(CANR); D'Souza, M. (CANR)


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