Why do we love a good beat?

 

When we listen to music, we often tap our feet or bob our head along to the beat; but why do we do it? New research led by Western Sydney University's MARCS Institute suggests the reason could be related to the way our brain processes low-frequency sounds.

The study, published in PNAS, recorded the electrical activity of volunteers’ brains while they listened to rhythmic patterns played at either low or high-pitched tones. The study found that while listening, volunteer’s brain activities and the rhythmic structure of the sound became synchronized – particularly at the frequency of the beat.

Co-author of the paper, Dr Sylvie Nozaradan from the MARCS Institute, say these findings strongly suggest that the bass exploits a neurophysiological mechanism in the brain – essentially forcing it to lock onto the beat.

Our very own Professor Peter Keller spoke with ABC's Triple J team in the 'What is Music' video series about his findings.

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