School of Science

Medical Sciences

Discipline Lead | Peter Shortland

The Medical Sciences discipline groups at Western Sydney University contains expert researchers who are engaged in a number of different research areas from basic discovery to translational studies. Using a cellular to systems level approach, members of this group study conditions such as neurodegeneration, infectious diseases, cancer, drug discovery, medical physiology, medicinal chemistry, medical microbiology, and pain, all of which have significant effects on human wellbeing. Strong collaborations exist with researchers in other disciplines (Medicine, Health, Biological, Sports & Exercise Sciences), government and industry partner organisations and international institutions.

Research output was rated in the 2018 Excellence in Research for Australia at world standard for Neurosciences, above world standard in Medical Sciences, Biochemistry and Cell Biology and well above world standard in Microbiology, Cancer and Pharmacology. Undergraduate and postgraduate teaching is guided by research-led discoveries so that students are up to date with theoretical insight and empirical rigour throughout their studies.


Academics for this Discipline

  • Professor Tim Karl
  • Ms Joan Lynch, Lecturer
  • Associate Professor David Mahns
  • Dr Sam Merlin, Lecturer
  • Professor Thomas Millar
  • Associate Professor Alison Moore
  • Dr Charles Morton, Senior Lecturer
  • Professor Gerald Muench
  • Dr Simon Myers, Senior Lecturer
  • Dr Garry Niedermayer, Lecturer
  • Dr Gabriel Perrone, Senior Lecturer
  • Dr Ben Perry, Lecturer
  • Dr Michael Phillips, Lecturer
  • Mr Zoran Pletikosa, Associate Lecturer
  • Dr Kiley Seymour, Senior Lecturer
  • Professor Ross Shalliker
  • Associate Professor Peter Shortland
  • Dr Colin Stack, Senior Lecturer
  • Associate Professor Genevieve Steiner, NHMRC-ARC Dementia Principle Research
  • Development Fellow
  • Professor Paul Wormell
  • Dr Ming Wu, Senior Lecturer
  • Dr Gang Zheng, Senior Lecturer

Ranked in the top 25 in Australia and top 400 worldwide for life sciences and medicine