Admission and Unit Information - Master of Creative Music Therapy

Accreditation

The Master of Creative Music Therapy is accredited with the Australian Music Therapy Association (AMTA). Graduates of the course are eligible to apply for Registration (RMT) with the AMTA which qualifies them to practice professionally.

Admission

Applicants must have successfully completed an undergraduate degree or higher in humanities, social science, creative arts, health science, music discipline;

OR

Successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline AND a minimum of two years full-time equivalent professional work experience in roles related to music therapy or music teaching or roles in a dance or vocal studio as a repiteur;

AND

Must attend an audition.

Audition:

You will be selected on an interview/audition in which personal aptitude and professional experience are taken into consideration. At your audition you will be asked to:

  • a) play two contrasting pieces on your first instrument, or if you are a vocalist, sing two contrasting pieces;
  • b) play a piece on your second instrument;
  • c) sight read a melody (instrumental and vocal);
  • d) harmonise a melody on the piano or other western polyphonic instrument;
  • e) improvise three simple variations on the piano or other western polyphonic instrument, on a given theme;
  • f) perform a free improvisation based on a given subject/theme, on the piano or an instrument of your choice. The improvisation should preferably be atonal.

Note: The piano must be included in a) or b).

Applicants who are unable to attend the audition in person will undertake a remote audio-visual audition (see b, c, d, e, and f. above.) Prior to the remote audition, these applicants should submit a DVD demonstrating musical proficiency (see a. above) - play two contrasting pieces on your first instrument, or if you are a vocalist, sing two contrasting pieces) and an essay of 1,500 words, describing their knowledge of Creative Music Therapy and why they wish to study it. The essay should include at least 4 references and use APA format.

Additional Application Information

Applicants wanting to have professional experience considered as part of the application process are required to submit:

• A curriculum vitae (CV) including:

- Details of a minimum of two years of full-time equivalent professional experience (paid, voluntary or student) in a supportive capacity with people in community, welfare, health, the arts or music settings, including dates and a description of duties.

- Details of training and experience in the respective roles.

• A statement of service or signed letters from employers confirming your role, duties and period of employment.

• A statement detailing how your professional experience prepares you to undertake postgraduate study.

For further information, contact the Course Advisor.

Applications from Australian and New Zealand citizens and holders of permanent resident visas must be made via the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC). Use the links below to apply via UAC or Western Sydney University. Applications made directly to Western Sydney do not have an application fee.

Applicants who have undertaken studies overseas may have to provide proof of proficiency in English. Local and International applicants who are applying through the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) will find details of minimum English proficiency requirements and acceptable proof on the UAC website. Local applicants applying directly to the University should also use the information provided on the UAC website.

http://www.uac.edu.au/

https://westernsydney.uac.edu.au/ws/

International applicants must apply directly to the Western Sydney University via the International Office.

International students applying to The University through the International Office can find details of minimum English proficiency requirements and acceptable proof on their website.

International Office

Overseas qualifications must be deemed by the Australian Education International - National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR) to be equivalent to Australian qualifications in order to be considered by UAC and Western Sydney University.

Course Structure

Qualification for this award requires the successful completion of 120 credit points including the units listed below.

Note:

The Music Therapy Skills and the Creative Music Therapy Practicum units are offered on a rotating two-year cycle and students enrol depending on which units are being offered in the current year. Intending applicants should check with the Course Advisor prior to commencement if they have any queries regarding the cycle of unit offerings.

Year 1

Autumn session

Music Therapy Method

Music Therapy Method provides a background to the historical development and theoretical underpinnings of music therapy worldwide with an emphasis on Creative Music Therapy. Normal human development through the lifespan is looked at in depth paralleled with studies of developmental disability and other conditions. Culture, gender, race, legislation, religion and socio-economics are examined as they relate to the place of music therapy in society. The fundamental principles of self-care for music therapy practitioners and students are addressed.

Choose one of (refer to note above)

Music Therapy Skills 1

Through a combination of music skills workshop and clinical placement, the unit opens up an exploration of improvisation, instrumental playing, repertoire, song writing, voice work and composition as techniques for music therapy. Listening techniques and the effects of music on human physiology and psychology are explored. Videos of case studies are played to illustrate clinical work. The placement introduces students to the practice of music therapy through observation and work with a registered music therapist (RMT).

Music Therapy Skills 2

Through a combination of music therapy skill development and clinical placement, this unit engages students in the study of improvisation, instrumental playing, repertoire, song writing, voice work and composition illustrated with advanced case material. The clinical placement introduces students to the practice of music therapy with younger clients, observing and working with a Registered Music Therapist (RMT).

Spring session

Music Therapy Theory and Practice 1

This unit examines contemporary psychological theories underpinning different approaches to music therapy with the specific focus on their implications for Creative Music Therapy and students will conduct a literature review of one of these approaches. Musical language and vlinical approach of Creative Music Therapy is discussed and the analysis of music for therapeutic purposes is explored. Students also receive an introduction to psychotherapy, music psychology, creative art therapies plus writing for clinical purposes.

Choose one of (refer to note above)

Creative Music Therapy Practicum 1

This unit focuses on the clinical practice of Creative Music Therapy. Students apply their coursework studies to music therapy practice through working, under supervision, with adults or children with disabilities or in other areas of clinical work deemed suitable. In addition, practical applications of various music therapy techniques are taught. Students are required to critically reflect on the clinical experience through professional writing and presentations. Basic introduction to music technology is given.

Creative Music Therapy Practicum 2

In this unit, students on placement provide music therapy to adults in aged care or in a psychiatric setting, or any other population group deemed appropriate. A student may work alone but will receive in-depth supervision from an RMT. Students are expected to work effectively within a multidisciplinary team. Students will compose and record an instrumental piece for therapy.

Year 2

Autumn session

Music Therapy Theory and Practice 2

The unit continues the development of skill to draw on concurrent clinical work with adult clients in different clinical situations including psychiatry, palliative care and aged care. Nordoff-Robbins philosophy, clinical studies and musicianship are explored. Different approaches to the study of clinical conditions as well as theories of stress, grief and loss are introduced.

Choose one of (refer to note above)

Music Therapy Skills 1

Through a combination of music skills workshop and clinical placement, the unit opens up an exploration of improvisation, instrumental playing, repertoire, song writing, voice work and composition as techniques for music therapy. Listening techniques and the effects of music on human physiology and psychology are explored. Videos of case studies are played to illustrate clinical work. The placement introduces students to the practice of music therapy through observation and work with a registered music therapist (RMT).

Music Therapy Skills 2

Through a combination of music therapy skill development and clinical placement, this unit engages students in the study of improvisation, instrumental playing, repertoire, song writing, voice work and composition illustrated with advanced case material. The clinical placement introduces students to the practice of music therapy with younger clients, observing and working with a Registered Music Therapist (RMT).

Spring session

Music Therapy Professional Practice

This unit provides students with professional skills in academic, clinical and report writing plus professional presentation skills. Introduced are the philosophical principles, techniques and evaluation in Creative Music Therapy. Students are also introduced to receptive methods of music therapy professional practice as well as being given a background to professional research writing. Aspects of self-care for music therapy practitioners and students are addressed.

Choose one of (refer to note above)

Creative Music Therapy Practicum 1

This unit focuses on the clinical practice of Creative Music Therapy. Students apply their coursework studies to music therapy practice through working, under supervision, with adults or children with disabilities or in other areas of clinical work deemed suitable. In addition, practical applications of various music therapy techniques are taught. Students are required to critically reflect on the clinical experience through professional writing and presentations. Basic introduction to music technology is given.

Creative Music Therapy Practicum 2

In this unit, students on placement provide music therapy to adults in aged care or in a psychiatric setting, or any other population group deemed appropriate. A student may work alone but will receive in-depth supervision from an RMT. Students are expected to work effectively within a multidisciplinary team. Students will compose and record an instrumental piece for therapy.