Stories

Science, Research, Climate Change and Agriculture: Stories From The Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

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10 March 20120

Researchers at Western Sydney University and The Australian National University have discovered new chemical communication pathways that determine how a plant changes when it emerges from darkness in the soil to light.

25 February 2020

Assoc Prof Matthias Boer at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment found that the area burned in Australia during the 2019-2020 forest fires far exceeds historic records worldwide.

Smoke Haze

11 February 2020

The alarming rate of carbon dioxide flowing into our atmosphere is affecting plant life in interesting ways – but perhaps not in the way you’d expect.

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5 February 2020

About every two years, the Institute stages a Research Symposium Day, an opportunity to hear from each other in a range of talks and presentations from one minute up to around 12 minutes each.

20 January 2020

White‐nose syndrome has recently decimated bat populations across North America. While the fungal pathogen currently doesn’t occur in Australia, the fungus is virtually certain to jump continents in the next decade.

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14 January 2020

The Federal Government has announced new funding for Western Sydney University researchers to develop a system for reliably forecasting the potential for bushfires...

Bushfire Scene 498x310

10 January 2020

Dr Rachael Nolan says her analyses of bushlands around Sydney in the final months of 2019 indicated that the landscape was primed for these catastrophic fires – but it was series of other conditions, all happening concurrently, that ultimately led to the disaster.

Forest floor

31 December 2019

We need the public’s help to identify the bees in Australian backyards. There’s a good chance some are not native, but are unwanted exotic species. Identifying new intruders before they become established will help protect our native species.

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2 December 2019

The potential for large, intense fires is determined by four fundamental ingredients: a continuous expanse of fuel; extensive and continuous dryness of that fuel; weather conditions conducive to the rapid spread of fire; and ignitions, either human or lightning. These act as a set of switches, in series: all must be “on” for major fires to occur.

Fire Nov2019

15 November 2019

Dr Renée Marchin Prokopavicius has been awarded an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA).

Renee Marchin

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