Stories

Science, Research, Climate Change and Agriculture: Stories From The Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

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12 May 2020

New research in Nature Climate Change provides evidence that rising temperatures are likely to increase crop losses as warmer soils favour the growth of pathogenic soil fungi species.

Alternaria fungus on apples

1st May 2020

In this pandemic it’s tempting to look for someone, or something, to blame. Bats are a common scapegoat and the community is misled to believe getting rid of them could be a quick fix. But are bats really the problem?

The Conversation logo

29 April 2020

Western Sydney University and its research partners are leading the way when it comes to donating tonnes of fresh, healthy produce to Foodbank NSW and ACT to support families in need through COVID-19.

Foodbank Donations

9 April 2020

Researchers at Western Sydney University’s EucFACE experiment have found new evidence of limitations in the capacity of mature forests to translate rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations into additional plant growth and carbon storage.

EucFACE Sunset

10 March 20120

Researchers at Western Sydney University and The Australian National University have discovered new chemical communication pathways that determine how a plant changes when it emerges from darkness in the soil to light.

25 February 2020

Assoc Prof Matthias Boer at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment found that the area burned in Australia during the 2019-2020 forest fires far exceeds historic records worldwide.

Smoke Haze

11 February 2020

The alarming rate of carbon dioxide flowing into our atmosphere is affecting plant life in interesting ways – but perhaps not in the way you’d expect.

The Conversation logo

5 February 2020

About every two years, the Institute stages a Research Symposium Day, an opportunity to hear from each other in a range of talks and presentations from one minute up to around 12 minutes each.

20 January 2020

White‐nose syndrome has recently decimated bat populations across North America. While the fungal pathogen currently doesn’t occur in Australia, the fungus is virtually certain to jump continents in the next decade.

The Conversation logo

10 January 2020

Dr Rachael Nolan says her analyses of bushlands around Sydney in the final months of 2019 indicated that the landscape was primed for these catastrophic fires – but it was series of other conditions, all happening concurrently, that ultimately led to the disaster.

Forest floor

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