Publications

Publications Book Cover 2013 Writing and Society Research Centre members and postgraduate students are actively engaged with both literary and academic publishing. We are also behind a number of important publishing initiatives.

The Sydney Review of Books

Sparked by concerns about the dwindling space for literary criticism in Australian media, the Sydney Review of Books (opens in a new window) is an online review site focusing on Australian writers and writing.

Giramondo

The Writing and Society Research Centre houses the prestigious Giramondo book imprint (opens in a new window) which publishes some of the most significant contemporary Australian authors.

Recent Staff Publications

The Death of Noah Glass
Gail Jones, The Death of Noah Glass, published by Text Publishing, 2018

The art historian Noah Glass, having just returned from a trip to Sicily, is discovered floating face down in the swimming pool at his Sydney apartment block. His adult children, Martin and Evie, must come to terms with the shock of their father’s death. But a sculpture has gone missing from a museum in Palermo, and Noah is a suspect. The police are investigating.
None of it makes any sense. Martin sets off to Palermo in search of answers about his father’s activities... »Read More (opens in a new window)

Literary Primitivism by Ben Etherington
Ben Etherington, Literary Primitivism, Published by Stanford University Press, 2017

This book fundamentally rethinks a pervasive and controversial concept in literary criticism and the history of ideas. Primitivism has long been accepted as a transhistorical tendency of the "civilized" to idealize that primitive condition against which they define themselves. In the modern era, this has been a matter of the "West" projecting its primitivist fantasies onto non-Western "others." Arguing instead that primitivism was an aesthetic mode produced in reaction to the apotheosis of European imperialism »Read More (opens in a new window)

Monkey Trouble by Chris Peterson


Christopher Peterson, Monkey Trouble: The Scandal of Posthumanism, published by Fordham University Press, 2017

According to scholars of the nonhuman turn, the scandal of theory lies in its failure to decenter the human. The real scandal, however, is that we keep trying. The displacement of the human is essential and urgent, yet given the humanist presumption that animals lack a number of allegedly unique human capacities, such as language, reason, and awareness of mortality, we ought to remain cautious about laying claim to any power to eradicate anthropocentrism altogether. »Read More (opens in a new window)

Ordinary Matters by Lorraine Sim
Lorraine Sim, Ordinary Matters: Modernist Women’s Literature and Photography, published by Bloomsbury, 2016

Ordinary Matters is the first major interdisciplinary study of the ordinary in modernist women's literature and photography. It examines how women photographers and writers including Helen Levitt, Lee Miller, Virginia Woolf and Dorothy Richardson envision the sphere of ordinary life in light of the social and cultural transformations of the period that shaped and often radically re-shaped it: for example, urbanism, instrumentalism, the Great Depression and war. »Read More (opens in a new window)

Ema the Captive by Cesar Aira
Chris Andrews (translator), Ema the Captive by Cesar Aira, pubished by New Directions, 2016

In nineteenth-century Argentina, Ema, a delicate woman of indeterminate origins, is captured by soldiers and taken, along with her newborn babe, to live as a concubine in a crude fort on the very edges of civilization. The trip is appalling (deprivations and rapes prevail along the way), yet the real story commences once Ema arrives at the fort. There she takes on a succession of lovers among the soldiers and Indians, before launching a grand and brave business »Read More (opens in a new window)

Edith Somerville and Martin Ross by Anne Jamison
Anne Jamison, E. Œ. Somerville and Martin Ross:  female authorship and literary collaboration, published by Cork University Press, 2016

This book explores the remarkable collaboration of one of the most prominent and successful female literary partnerships at work in the late nineteenth century; Irish authors, Edith Somerville (1858–1949) and Violet Martin/Martin Ross (1862–1915). Based on extensive and original archival research, it reorients traditional thinking about Somerville and Ross’s partnership and rethinks the collaboration beyond a purely domestic and personal affair. »Read More (opens in a new window)



»More staff publications


Recent Student Publications

Creation and the Function of Art by Jason Tuckwel
Jason Tuckwell, Creation and the Function of Art, published by Bloomsbury, 2017

Returning to the Greek understanding of art to rethink its capacities, Creation and the Function of Art focuses on the relationship between techné and phusis (nature). Moving away from the theoretical Platonism which dominates contemporary understandings of art, this book instead reinvigorates Aristotelian causation. Beginning with the Greek topos and turning to insights from philosophy, pure mathematics, psychoanalysis and biology, Jason Tuckwell re-problematises techné in functional terms. »Read More (opens in a new window)

Ghostspeaking by Peter Boyle Cover
Peter Boyle, Ghostspeaking, Vagabond Press, 2016

Eleven fictive poets from Latin America, France and Québec. Their poems, interviews, biographies and letters weave images of diverse lives and poetics. In the tradition of Fernando Pessoa, Boyle presents an array of at times humorous, at times tormented heteronymous poets. In their varied voices and styles, writing as they do across the span of the 20th Century and into the 21st , these haunted and haunting figures offer one of poetry's oldest gifts – to sing beauty in the face of death. In all this Boyle, their fictive translator, is deeply enmeshed. »Read More (opens in a new window)

Cormac McCarthy Borders and Landscapes book cover
Lou Jillet (editor), Cormac McCarthy's Borders and Landscapes, Published by Bloomsbury, 2016

Cormac McCarthy's work is attracting an increasing number of scholars and critics from a range of disciplines within the humanities and beyond, from political philosophy to linguistics and from musicology to various branches of the sciences. Cormac McCarthy's Borders and Landscapes contributes to this developing field of research, investigating the way McCarthy's writings speak to other works within the broader fields of American literature, international literature, border literature, and other forms of comparative literature. »Read More (opens in a new window)

A Chinese Affair by Isabelle Li
Isabelle Li, A Chinese Affair, published by Margaret River Press, 2016

These sixteen stories present characters who share much, yet are all unique. As if in a kaleidoscope, they continue to be revealed and reinterpreted in different lights and from different angles. Isabelle Li's prose is powerful, exquisite and finely tuned, and each story draws us deeper into the complex emotional and cultural dilemmas of characters who are solitary, sensitive, perceptive and powerless, sometimes all at once. A Chinese Affair is a beautiful book, elegant and accomplished, and a triumph of the art of the short story. »Read More(opens in a new window)

»More Student Publications

Future Directions in Publishing

A key area of interest for Writing and Society going forward is digital publishing in its various forms and the ongoing changes in the ways writing is now disseminated. This is reflected in the publishing strategies adopted by Writing and Society. The Sydney Review of Books is an online review site with ever expanding readership, soundsRite already offers cutting edge digital publication.

Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to the following organisations for their funding and support: the Literature Board of the Australia Council (Giramondo, The Sydney Review of Books), Arts NSW (The Sydney Review of Books, Western Sydney Writing Project) and The Copyright Agency (The Sydney Review of Books).

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Award Winning Novel

Writing and Society's Professor Gail Jones has won the Kibble Literary Award for her novel Five Bells »Read More (opens in a new window)

Poetry Prize Winner

Congratulations to centre member Chris Andrews whose collection of poems, Lime Green Chair, has won the Anthony Hecht Prize in the United States. »Read More

Sweatshop

The Writing and Society Research Centre is home to Sweatshop Western Sydney Literacy Movement. The movement helps to foster writing, publishing and literary culture in Western Sydney. »Read More