News from the School of Social Sciences



New ACFID Affiliate Member: Western Sydney University - School of Social Sciences

Western Sydney University - School of Social Sciences was awarded Affiliate Membership by the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) Council at the ACFID AGM on 26 October 2016.

As an ACFID Affiliate Member the School of Social Sciences is able to access a wide range of ACFID member benefits, including discounted training rates, participation in ACFID member activities and Communities of Practice.

More specifically, the school can access services and events below:

  • Participate in ACFID's Communities of Practice – more information on ACFID's CoPs can be found on the ACFID website.
  • Join us at our next Member Information Forum in February/March 2017 (date TBC), a fantastic free opportunity to learn the latest news from the sector and network with other ACFID members;
  • Access the ACFID Member Bulletin and CEO updates with essential information on sector issues and development – you have been added to our mailing list and will receive information on a monthly basis, or when significant issues arise.
  • Participate on the Research for Development Impact Network- more information is available on our website at Join the RDI Network (opens in new window)Opens in a new window

If you would like any further information about how to access any of these benefits, please contact our Membership & Stakeholder Coordinator Sophie Green on sgreen@acfid.asn.au or 02 6281 9235.

Stories from the Heart: Critical Creative and Compassionate Research

Date: Tuesday, 18 April 2017
Presenter: Debbie Horsfall

Abstract
How do we enable people to speak the unspoken and the difficult, to tell us about what really matters to them. How do we tell the stories entrusted to us and avoid
smoothing out the visceral and emotional along the researcher's way? How do we capture the space of the possible rather than the space of the usual and enlarge conversations for change in policy and practice? And what does it take to listen? The space of the possible is a vulnerable space, a difficult
space to inhabit. However vulnerability can enable you to get straight to the heart of the matter, to be compassionately and intellectually engaged with another's lived experience. With/in this space there is the possibility of an open-hearted practice which both enables people to speak the unspoken
and be supported as they do. Drawing from a number of collaborative projects I will talk about creating and inhabiting these spaces with people living with complex mental illnesses.

Biography
I am passionate about teaching, researching and living in ways which work against
domination and oppression of people and planet. My transformative agenda privileges people's voices during a myriad of challenging life events and is informed by creativity, inclusivity, a feminist ethic and a politics of hope. I have over 25 years' experience researching with people from a community
development and relationship-building perspective. My work is strengths based and I strive to support people to have a voice, speak out and be heard. This has included working with: Carers NSW; Australian Women in Agriculture; Community Mental Health; The Benevolent Society; the Prime Ministers Youth
Action Task Force; HOME Hospice; Cancer Council and the Australian Department of Disability, Ageing and Home Care. The research I am currently working on explores the development of ecologies of care and sustainable, compassionate communities in end of life care and for people living with mental illness
or escaping domestic violence.

Is the Water Safer than the Land? Public Representations of Syrian Refugees and the Power of a Warm Welcome

Date: Tuesday 15 November, 2016
Presenter: Professor Uma Kothari, Managing Director, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester

Abstract


At present, news bulletins, television documentaries, newspaper articles, radio programmes and forms of social media are debating the 'refugee crisis'. They depict the experiences of refugees, document their journeys and arrivals, inform us about the causes of migration, and examine the potential impact
on the people and places they encounter. How does this unprecedented media coverage shape our understandings of refugees? How can we interpret and challenge the ideas and meanings that generate powerful, and often negative, connotations around terms such as 'migrant' and 'refugee'? This presentation
begins by briefly examining the historical forms and the power of such representations before exploring how current images and texts of refugees reinforce global inequalities or alternatively, might forge new kinds of global alliances. I focus on how certain images can change our dispositions towards
refugees, enabling us to recognise the power of a warm, face-to-face welcome in an overwhelmingly digital age. We are positioned at a critical moment, one replete with potential to shape future inter-generational and cross-cultural understanding. In this context, I conclude by foregrounding the politics
and power of welcome, arguing that it can profoundly impact on a refugee's perception of place and people, forging longer lasting affiliations and promising the development of a future sense of belonging.


Biography


Uma Kothari is Professor of Migration and Postcolonial Studies and Director of the Global Development Institute in the School of Environment, Education and Development at University of Manchester. Her research interests include international development and humanitarianism and migration, refugees and
diasporas. Her research has involved a number of funded projects, most recently an Australian Research Council project on International Volunteering and Cosmopolitanism, and a Norwegian Research Council project on Perceptions of Climate Change and Migration. Her current research is on Visual Solidarity
and Everyday Humanitarianism. She has published numerous articles. Her books include Participation: the new tyranny? (2001), Development Theory and Practice: critical perspectives (2001),andA Radical History of Development Studies (2005). She is currently writing a book on Time, Geography and Global
Inequalities. She was recently made a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and conferred the Royal Geographical Society's Busk Medal for her contributions to research in support of global development.

Hillsborough: The Truth

Date: Tuesday 25 October, 2016

On 26 April 2016 the jury at the new inquests into the 1989 Hillsborough disaster determined that the 96 people who died were unlawfully killed, marking a major milestone in the bereaved families' journey for justice. It is a campaign that has been informed and shaped by the work of Queen's University,
Belfast Professor of Criminology, Phil Scraton.


Phil's in-depth research into the context, circumstances and aftermath of the Hillsborough disaster includes the publication of two influential reports, published in 1990 and 1995; numerous academic articles; and the much-acclaimed book Hillsborough: The Truth. His critical analysis of the investigations,
inquiries and inquests into the controversial deaths of 96 men, women and children at an FA Cup Semi-Final in April 1989 was instrumental in the Home Secretary establishing the Hillsborough Independent Panel to review hundreds of thousands of documents held by over 80 organisations.


Film, followed by Q & A Facilitated by Professor Dick Hobbs, Western Sydney University

"There shouldn't be a place like this – we're not bad people": young people's views about, and experiences of, secure care in Northern Ireland

Date: Monday 24 October, 2016

Presenter: Dr Deena Haydon


A child may be admitted to secure care if s/he has a history of absconding and is likely to abscond from any other accommodation and, if s/he absconds, is likely to suffer significant harm or is likely to injure her/himself or other persons (Article 44(2) of the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995).


In 2015, Dr Deena Haydon was commissioned to consult with young people in Northern Ireland's secure care centre, to inform the Northern Ireland NGO Alternative Report submitted to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in advance of the Committee's examination of implementation of the UN Convention
on the Rights of the Child [UNCRC] by the UK Government.


Insight into the views of young people deprived of their liberty in secure care - about their rights generally, whilst in care, and within secure accommodation - will provide the basis for discussion about how the needs of vulnerable young people can best be addressed in ways that promote and protect
their rights.


Biography 


Dr Deena Haydon is an independent research consultant and a member of the Childhood, Transition and Social Justice Initiative at Queen's University Belfast. Before moving to Northern Ireland in 2003, she conducted and managed research as a Principal Officer for Research and Development at Barnardo's
in the NW of England. Prior to this she held a Senior Lectureship and Head of Research post in the School of Education at Edge Hill University, Lancashire.


Deena's main research interests include parenting and family support, youth justice, and children's rights. Her recent work includes a commission by the Children's Law Centre to consult with Roma children and young people, and with young people in secure care, to inform development of the Northern Ireland
NGO Alternative Report submitted to the UN Committee in 2015. She has presented workshops, seminars and conference papers for academic and public audiences in the UK, Europe, the US and Australia..


Download the flyer [PDF, 359.13 KB].

HIV/AIDS and Social Work: Modelling HIV protective behaviour from a social work perspective and experiences with cooperative prevention intervention development.

Date: Wednesday 19 October, 2016

Presenter: Professor & Dean Daniel Gredig of University of Applied Sciences North-western Switzerland.


Daniel Gredig is a Professor and Dean of Master-Studies in Social Work at the School of Social Work, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. Currently, he is a visiting professor at the University of Newcastle, NSW. He was trained in Social Work at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland)
and at the Freie Universität Berlin (Germany). He received his PhD from the University of Zurich. His recent research and publications have focused on the history of social work, research-based intervention development and innovation in social work, HIV protective behaviour and HIV prevention, stigma
experiences of people living with diabetes, and cooperation of researchers and professionals in social work.


Download the HIV/AIDS and Social Work: Modelling HIV protective behaviour from a social work perspective and experiences with cooperative prevention intervention development flyer [PDF, 34.97 KB].

HIV/AIDS and Social Work: Modelling HIV protective behaviour from a social work perspective and experiences with cooperative prevention intervention development.

Date: Wednesday 19 October, 2016

Presenter: Professor & Dean Daniel Gredig of University of Applied Sciences North-western Switzerland.


Daniel Gredig is a Professor and Dean of Master-Studies in Social Work at the School of Social Work, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. Currently, he is a visiting professor at the University of Newcastle, NSW.


He was trained in Social Work at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) and at the Freie Universität Berlin (Germany). He received his PhD from the University of Zurich.


His recent research and publications have focused on the history of social work, research-based intervention development and innovation in social work, HIV protective behaviour and HIV prevention, stigma experiences of people living with diabetes, and cooperation of researchers and professionals in
social work.


Download the HIV/AIDS and Social Work: Modelling HIV protective behaviour from a social work perspective and experiences with cooperative prevention intervention development flyer. [PDF, 34.97 KB]

Symposium on Older Women and Violence: Innovative Policies, Programs and Practices

Wednesday, 21 September 2016


The aim of this symposium is to bring together people working with older women in Greater Western Sydney, to network and share promising policies, programs and practices to prevent violence against older women and to build strategic alliances and ongoing research partnerships. On the day the OWN Theatre
Group will perform the hilarious yet at times sombre musical production, 'Don't Knock Your Granny', which uses songs, skits and puppetry to raise awareness and prevent violence against older women. You will have the opportunity to hear about innovative policies and practices from leading practitioners
and agencies in Western Sydney including: Marnie Fitzpatrick, Older Women's Network (OWN) Wellness Centres; Meredith Lea, People with Disability Australia; Jane Gold & Samantha Hunter, Penrith Women's Health Centre; Lyla Coorey (presenting on behalf of Lynda Andrews), ECAV, NSW Health; Nicole Laurance,
Social Workers in Disabilities (SWID) & Denise Beckwith, Silent Tears project; Adriana Volona, Cumberland Women's Health Centre; Louise Sutcliffe, Western Sydney Community Forum; Julie Williams & Beth Collins, City of Parramatta; Sandie O'Neill, Leep NGO Inc, and Amrit Versha, TAFE NSW &
Nalika Padmasena, Seniors Rights Service.

You will also meet Dr Julie McGarry, University of Nottingham, UK, Chair of the Domestic Violence and Abuse Integrated Research Group.  Julie will showcase the innovative open access arts based e-learning resource, Unlocking Stories, co-created by older women in the UK.

Public Lecture and Film Showing

Wednesday, 7 September 2016


T.G.H. Strehlow and Movements to Repatriate Knowledge in Central Australia


Public Lecture by James L. Cox


'Mr Strehlow's Films' by Hart Cohen


For more information about this event please download the Public Lecture and Film Showing flyer [PDF, 165.91 KB].

Not So Simple Questions Regarding Gender In/Equality and Violence

Friday, 26 August 2016

Guest speaker: Dr Laura Zimmer Tamakoshi


Abstract


Drawing on thirty-four years' experience with the Gende, a hundred years of Gende pre- and post-contact history, and studies done elsewhere in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific, Laura lays out a not so simple trajectory of Gende gender relations and ends her talk examining current theories and s peculations
on the relationship/s between gender in/equality and violence.


Download the Not So Simple Questions Regarding Gender In/Equity and Violence flyer [PDF, 237.36 KB]

HSC Enrichment Days

Public Workshop

Thursday 18 August 2016


Transnational Social Workers: professional identity, culture and practice


Presenter: Dr Shereen Hussein


Abstract


Social workers along other health care professionals are increasingly globally mobile, pursuing employment opportunities that combine professional and lifestyle projects. Unlike many other health professions, social work skills and practice include cultural and national-specific elements that might
not be directly translated within a global context. Presenting an additional layer to the existing maze of barriers any transnational professional need to negotiate in their pursuit of global mobility. The United Kingdom has actively relied on many overseas qualified social workers to fill shortages
in the social work profession especially in relation to children social work, however, with a changing patterns and intensity. The current workshop explores the interface between the need for transnational social workers and the difficulties they face in their professional and personal path, using the
UK as a case study. Using national statistics, survey and interview data with social workers and regulators in the UK and Europe, this presentation explores the sources of information and decision-making frames transnational social workers use while ensuing professional and personal experiences. It also
addresses issues of socio-political and historical contexts of cultural diversity in host countries and how these are perceived and negotiated by transnational social workers. The discussion will explore the commonalities and difference of these issues within the Australian context. The workshop is designed
to be interactive with an opportunity for participants to contribute their views and experiences on the topic.


For more information about this event download the flyer: Transnational Social Workers: professional identity, culture and practice [PDF, 55.42 KB]

Professorial Lecture Series 2

Tuesday 16 August, 2016


Migration and Health Research in Australia: Progress, challenges, and opportunities


Presenter: Prof Andre Renzaho


Abstract


Australia has a long history of migration. Up to 1945 there was a 'white Australia' policy, which changed to accepting a more diverse migrant pool, including forced migrants (e.g. refugees).There is increasingly a need to understand and cater for the specific health needs of migrants, especially those
from non-English speaking (NES) backgrounds, many of whom are not adequately recognised in population health planning. The vast increase in investment in prevention and health promotion may not cater for their needs without their participation in research and planning. This presentation will look at
migrants' participation in research in Australia, discuss the main challenges, examine the burden of health among migrant's pre and post 1980s, and explore areas of urgent attention to inform policies geared towards reducing migration-related inequities and further research.


For more information about this lecture download the flyer: Migration and Health Research in Australia: Progress, challenges, and opportunities [PDF, 76.66 KB]

Research Seminar

Tuesday 26 July, 2016


'Migration and Health in China'


Presenter: Wen Chen


Bio: Wen Chen, PhD, is a Lecturer within School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Project Manager at Sun Yat-sen Center for Migrant Health Policy and Senior Visiting Researcher at Western Sydney University , and joined in NIH Fogarty Global Health Program during 2013 and 2014 as a post-doc.
Her research interests focus on migrant health and health policy, especially in health services utilization and health behavioral intervention. Dr. Chen has published more than 40 articles and 6 books (chapters). She has also organized multi-disciplinary research projects on migration health in China
which were supported by international and domestic research foundations and governments.


'Forced Eviction of Century-old Brothels and Cinundrums Surrounding Sex Worker's Rights in Bangladesh'


Presenter: Professor ASM Amanullah, PhD (UNSW), Department of Sociology, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh


Bio: Dr. A.S.M. Amanullah is a Professor of Sociology at Dhaka University. He has been involved in more than 100 research projects funded by national and international donors and published more than 120 scholarly articles, books and research reports. As one of the leading figures in the region in applying
human right approaches to disease prevention, Prof Amanullah continues to provide insight, and add new dimensions to the research on sex work and sexual behaviours among at risk populations; as well as the human right dimensions of and prevention strategies against sexually transmitted diseases
such as HIV/AIDS.


For more information download the seminar flyer [PDF, 162.62 KB]

Crowd Safety and Risk Analysis

Tuesday 19 July, 2016

Speaker: Professor Keith Still

Professor Still developed and teaches a short course on crowd safety and risk analysis delivered at client sites around the world as a bridging course between industry experience and academia. The course takes the delegates from basic understanding of crowd safety and risk analysis in places of public
assembly and works through the principles and applications of causality for major incidents. Typical delegates include site or venue operational managers, stewarding and security organisations, police officers, architects and local authority officers with licensing, planning or leisure management responsibilities.


For more information download the Crown Safety and Risk Analysis event flyer [PDF, 486.67 KB]

Workshop: Cognitive remediation therapy for eating disorders and obesity

Monday, 18 July 2016

hands holding a green apple

Western Sydney University is proud to introduce a one day workshop on Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) for obesity and anorexia nervosa. Individuals with anorexia nervosa and obesity have been found to have cognitive deficiencies in the area of executive function. Randomised controlled trials have
confirmed that CRT improves executive function in individuals with anorexia nervosa, and in turn it improved quality of life and reduced eating disorder symptoms. We have conducted a trial of CRT for obesity and found that CRT improved executive function (Cohen's d = 0.86) and in turn it helped individuals
lose weight (6.5% of weight loss at three month follow-up).


This workshop aims to teach you powerful techniques to target executive function problems, found to be prevalent in individuals with anorexia nervosa and obesity. You will have the opportunity to practice applying the techniques in the workshop, and you will receive a copy of the manual.

Migration Report and Book Launch

Wednesday 29 June 2016


Join Chancellor Peter Shergold for the launch of the 'Migrant Trajectories' Report and the Book, Globalisation, Migration and Health: Challenges and Opportunities by the University of Western Sydney.


The book launch featured in the Blacktown Sun (opens in a new window) newspaper.

Stories of Recovery From the Bush

Thursday, 23 June 2016


The Benevolent Society and Western Sydney University invite you to a photographic and narrative exhibition celebrating the lives of people living with complex mental illness.


The Stories of Recovery research project asked participants of the Western NSW Partners in Recovery (PIR) program how their identity, relationships and experiences of social inclusion are shaped by their lived experience of mental illness; how that lived experience is impacted by living in regional
and rural NSW; and what they have found helpful and supportive in their recovery journeys. The project put participant's knowledge and experience at the centre of the research through the use of visual research methods. Participant narratives and a selection of their photographs will be on display at
the Exhibition and Research Report launch.


This exhibition emerged from a collaborative exploration of how creative media like photography can give voice to the recovery process for people with lived experience of persistent and severe mental illness. The exhibition showcases photographs taken by participants in the Stories of Recovery
research project. The photographs are accompanied by the voice of each participant in the form of a written narrative which is reproduced in this catalogue, together with a selection of the exhibited photographs. The process began with each group of participants meeting for a 'photovoice'
workshop where they were provided with cameras to document what was important to them on their recovery journey. Some weeks following each workshop, participants met with the researchers to discuss their photographs and begin the narrative process. The exhibition was curated
by Dr Joy Paton in collaboration with the participants and researchers, Ms Amie Carrington and Professor Debbie Horsfall.


For more information about the exhibition please download the catalogue [PDF, 2439.59 KB].

SSAP IT Lightning Talks

Friday 10 June, 2016


The School of Social Sciences invites you to the inaugural SSAP IT Lightning Talks Research Showcase. We aim to foster conversations and collaborations across the School, the University, and our communities.


Please see the flyer for programme details [PDF, 99.93 KB].(opens in a new window)

Presentation by Mr Yves Kamuronsi from the Kigali Genocide Memorial, Rwanda

Monday 30 May, 2016


Speaker: Mr Yves Kamuronsi, Rwanda Director for the Aegis Trust


Yves is a survivor of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi and was formerly Head of Documentation at the Kigali Genocide Memorial (operated by the Aegis Trust, an international genocide prevention NGO) where he helped establish the Genocide Archive Rwanda.Yves's visit is supported by the Young and Well
Cooperative Research Centre through a research team involving staff of the School of Social Sciences and the Institute for Culture and Society.


For more information on the Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre see links below:


New ACFID Affiliate Member: Western Sydney University - School of Social Sciences

Western Sydney University - School of Social Sciences was awarded Affiliate Membership by the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) Council at the ACFID AGM on 26 October 2016.

As an ACFID Affiliate Member the School of Social Sciences is able to access a wide range of ACFID member benefits, including discounted training rates, participation in ACFID member activities and Communities of Practice.

More specifically, the school can access services and events below:

  • Participate in ACFID's Communities of Practice – more information on ACFID's CoPs can be found on the ACFID website.
  • Join us at our next Member Information Forum in February/March 2017 (date TBC), a fantastic free opportunity to learn the latest news from the sector and network with other ACFID members;
  • Access the ACFID Member Bulletin and CEO updates with essential information on sector issues and development – you have been added to our mailing list and will receive information on a monthly basis, or when significant issues arise.
  • Participate on the Research for Development Impact Network- more information is available on our website at Join the RDI Network (opens in a new window)

If you would like any further information about how to access any of these benefits, please contact our Membership & Stakeholder Coordinator Sophie Green on sgreen@acfid.asn.au or 02 6281 9235.


Students in the media

Forum8 Design Festival

Dea Kandasamy and Jacob Cross (SSAP Planning Students) won the "Excellence Award' at the recent Award Ceremony held in Tokyo during the Forum8 Design Festival. Dea and Jacob went to Tokyo as finalists of the Virtual Design Competition in Melbourne. They developed a concept based on 'Urban farming' for the Melbourne re-development area of Lorimer, and implemented it in a 3D virtual model in Forum8 software.

Student campaigns for special needs trolleys in Australia

Castle Hill resident Brittany Hawke is campaigning for trolleys for the disabled to be available at all major shopping centres in Australia. "Able-bodied people do not understand how difficult simple tasks can be for both people living with disabilities and their parents and careers," she said. The second year social work student from Western Sydney University hopes to raise awareness of the difficulties families face in light of her own family's experience. (Hills News) (opens in a new window)


Staff in the media

Emma Waterton and Hayley Saul

  • Emma Waterton and Hayley Saul were in Langtang last year researching its archaeology, heritage and development when the April 25 earthquake set off a massive avalanche that buried the village. Dr Waterton and Dr Saul were helping write Langtang's history when they narrowly escaped the disaster. Recently they visited the village for the first time since the tragic event. Research objectives have shifted since the earthquake, with plans to use the data collected to make a commemorative Sacred Valley of Langtang Museum. With funding from Western, an exhibition will extend outside to various locations attached to stories and histories of the people in the village. Locals are reviewing and finalising museum plans presented to them by Western vice-chancellor Barney Glover. "It's a debt we have as a university to the people of the valley of Langtang," said School of Social Sciences Dean, Professor Kevin Dunn. It is hoped the museum will be completed by April. (Daily Telegraph online)
  • Australian researchers caught up in avalanche last year are building a cultural museum to boost tourism, reports the Nepali Times. Drs Emma Waterton and Hayley Saul from Western Sydney University were in Langtang last year researching its archaeology, heritage and development when the 25 April earthquake set off a massive avalanche that buried the village. "We had just finished our research in the village and were half way through our trek. There were so many reasons why we should have died," Saul said, recalling the horror of watching the cliff face opposite them peel away and fall into the river below. With funding from Western Sydney University, an exhibition will extend outside to various locations attached to stories and histories of the people in the village. (Nepali Times) (opens in a new window)

Peter Jonason

Research conducted by Dr Peter Jonason into the traits of the psychopath is reported by international news sites, Taringa (Argentina), and Noticia hoy en Mexico.

Liquan Liu

Exposure to multiple languages may sharpen infants' music sensitivity in the first year after birth, new research has found. Compared to infants learning one language (monolinguals), those who grow up with more than one language (bilinguals/multilinguals) are more sensitive to the subtle pitch variations in language. Dr Liquan Liu writes for The Conversation (opens in a new window).

Kevin Dunn

Australia's racism has roots in its history of colonisation and migration, and, until recent years, racist policies and practices were embedded within Australian laws and institutions, and the debate has become tied up with national identity. Pro Bono Australia (opens in a new window) has a three part series podcast about the issue. Interviewed for the series is Professor Kevin Dunn, the Dean of the School of Social Science at Western Sydney University.

Emma Power

  • Having a no "pets policy" in residential leases causes a "serious obstacle" to housing security, according to new research, though the topic has divided Illawarra Mercury readers. A ten year study from Western Sydney University found pet owners struggle with rental insecurity despite the popularity of pet ownership (63 per cent of Australian households include a pet). The paper, by senior research fellow Emma Power , "advocates for inclusion of pet ownership as a variable impacting secure occupancy". (Illawarra Mercury)
  • A Conversation article about pet ownership and rental insecurity written by Dr Emma Power from the School of Social Sciences is republished by City Metric (opens in a new window) in the UK.

Jane Mears

Single women over 45 with limited savings who have lost a job have almost no chance of finding affordable housing in the Penrith region, frontline workers have found. "Once you lose your job at 45, your chances of getting another one are very slight," said Jane Mears, associate professor in social policy at Western Sydney University. Mission Australia is urging the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments to facilitate funding of at least 200,000 new social homes by 2025. (Penrith Press)

Dallas Rogers

  • Dr Dallas Rogers, Urban Studies Researcher with the Institute for Culture and Society and School of Social Sciences writes about the changes to foreign real estate investment regulations. The piece is published by the Illawarra Mercury, after it was first published by The Conversation.
  • Dr Dallas Rogers writes about how the changes for off-the-plan foreign buyers rely on a broken supply argument, in a piece published by The Conversation.(opens in a new window)
  • Sydney's great urban sprawl will soon come to an end, with new data showing the Sydney basin is nearing capacity. There are 340,000 potential housing lots left throughout the Greater Sydney basin, less than half the number needed to house the city's bulging population over the next two decades. Increasing the density of the city will also require shifting focus from housing to jobs, services and transport, Western Sydney University urban studies lecturer Dallas Rogers provides expert comment. He said: "Philosophically there's no limit to how many people are housed in a city. But there are practical limitations and we're already feeling these," Dr Rogers said. Signs of these limitations include schools with no room for more students and congestion on the roads. "The dilemma with cities is that you're not starting from a clean slate, they come with a whole set of characteristics you have to work with. [Sydney] was built over 200 years and it's hard to retrofit it with a modern metropolis," he said. (Sydney Morning Herald)

Michael Salter

  • Criminologist Dr Michael Salter discusses peadophilia in an article in The Saturday Paper on criminal artists. "The wrongfulness of child sexual abuse was debated as part of the sex research of the '50s and the sexual liberation of the '60s," he says. "A naive and romanticised view of children's 'sexual rights' that included a 'right' to sexual activity with adults emerged in some corners of sexology and countercultural movements. This reached its apex in the 1970s with the formation of various pro-paedophile movements, some of which were quite influential, particularly Britain's Paedophile Information Exchange, which included senior public servants. (Saturday Paper) (opens in a new window)
  • Triple J interview with David Williams, Melbourne Men's Rights Activist, and Dr Michael Salter, Lecturer in Criminology, about the Australian screening of The Red Pill, a documentary about the men's rights movement. Dr Salter says while the movement does bring up real issues facing men such as men's health and suicidality, they tend to direct this towards girls and women rather than trying to find real solutions. (Triple J)(opens in a new window)
  • An online group boasting more than 40 members, the majority of whom appear to attend Brighton Grammar in Melbourne, have been charged for hosting an Instagram account targeting young girls with sexual harassment. Western Sydney University criminologist Dr Michael Salter says that when it comes to institutional defensiveness, it is not just administrative staff who have a vested interest in protecting and defending a school's reputation. "Parents also have a financial interest in minimising what's happened, especially if they have invested a great deal of money in aligning themselves with the school (and its reputation)," he says. (Daily Telegraph, PerthNow) (opens in a new window)
  • Ahead of White Ribbon Day, The Saturday Paper can reveal significant tensions inside the organisation, with accusations it is more focused on branding than meaningful cultural change. There are also concerns White Ribbon's awareness-raising juggernaut is dominating an underfunded sector, taking resources from front-line services struggling with soaring demand. The organisation's latest annual report noted revenue of $3.6 million, $330,000 of it from government grants. In a sector defined by budget cuts, White Ribbon recorded double-digit growth. "The point of engaging men and boys in preventing violence against women is that engagement sometimes needs to be critical and needs to involve feedback to men in positions of power that says, 'This is not okay,'" said Michael Salter , a criminologist from Western Sydney University who works with victims, perpetrators and front-line services. He provides expert comment on the issue. (The Saturday Paper)

New Colombo Plan Mobility Grants

Congratulations to Zulfan Tadjoeddin and John Hunter for their successful outcome in the 2017 New Colombo Plan Mobility Grants. The projects awarded are:

Project Leader

Project Name

Destination

Funding Amount

Zulfan Tadjoeddin

Understanding the real world of humanitarian and development in Indonesia

Indonesia

$33,000

John Hunter

Bachelor of Community and Social Development Fijian Placement

Fiji

$33,000


Research Success

HADRI consultancy

The Humanitarian and Development Research Initiative (HADRI) established in June this year is pleased to announce that we have been successful in the tender to Wentworth Healthcare Limited (WHL), value $64,706, to undertake research into the health experience and needs of Syrian and Iraqi families settling in the Nepean Blue Mountains Primary Health Network (PHN) region.

The full name of the project is: "Preliminary assessment of the (mental) health needs of, and services available for Syrian and Iraqi refugees settling in the Blue Mountains Region". This is important work that articulates closely with HADRI's three research programs, specifically the 'International Migration and Health' program, and with the local community.

100 lives in Western Sydney

A team led by Associate Professor Brian Stout has recently agreed to carry out a $220,000 research project with the Western Sydney Service Delivery Reform (SDR) Group.  This group comprises Family and Community Services (FACS), Health, Education, Juvenile Justice and the Police and SDR is facilitated by the Premier and Cabinet to encourage better working relationships. SDR consists of a number of projects and Western Sydney University will be working as a partner to research the overall programme and individual projects.

All the research will be carried out under the title of '100 lives in Western Sydney', to emphasise the priority of ensuring that the initiatives have a real impact on people's lives. The research team will be using a realist methodology to research:

  • Service Delivery Reform: the process of the agencies working together;
  • Making a Safe Home (MaSH): agencies working together to allow children to stay at home rather than being taken into residential care;
  • Vulnerable Families: agencies working together to support identified families in need;
  • Niland School: inter-agency working to support the children in this school, all of whom have a dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and emotional disability.

The core team initially includes Associate Professor Brian Stout, Dr Susan Evans and Chris Krogh from Social Sciences and Dr Ann Dadich from the School of Business. Other Western Sydney researchers, including Dr Kerry Clamp, will also become involved as the programme progresses. The research programme will produce high quality research outputs and support important partners as they make a difference to the lives of people in Western Sydney.

Funding Success

Dr Tamara Watson ARC Discovery Projects grant

$335,500 'Flower Power: Natural Form, Aesthetics and the Human Brain'

Dr Jioji Ravulo – Co-funded HDR stipend

HopePlus is funding a joint stipend with Western Sydney University for a PhD Research Student to support its mission to challenge youth unemployment and disengagement in the City of Fairfield. HopePlus is a whole of community initiative that will use the Collective Impact framework. It will address youth unemployment, identify barriers and implement practical solutions to support young people into meaningful and sustainable work. In addition, the successful candidate will be a member of the HopePlus team within Woodville Alliance in Villawood.

Western THRI Translational Health Research Grant Scheme

Dr Evelyn Smith, Dr Jioji Ravulo and led by Dr Freya MacMillan, School of Science and Health.

Preventing Diabetes and its Complications in the Greater Western Sydney Samoan community.

This project aims to prevent diabetes and its complications in the Greater Western Sydney (GWS) Samoan community. It will increase knowledge and translational skills on effective diabetes prevention and management support programs in the Samoan community living in South Western Sydney (SWS); and strengthen relationships with the Samoan community, Local Health District (LHD) and Primary Heath Network (PHN) partners in SWS, Western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains (NBM).

External Income $144,000 and Western Sydney University $60,000

Dr Jenna Condie, Dr Phillip Wadds, Dr Cameron McAufliffe, Dr Andrew Gorman-Murray, School of Social Sciences Urban Research Program

Collaborative Research Project with Parramatta City Council $40,000 plus $40,000 matched funds from School of Social Sciences over 2 years.

This research partnership will provide empirical research and theoretical frameworks to enhance implementation of the Parramatta Safety Plan. The partnership will enable innovation in thinking and the capacity to convert new research findings specific to Parramatta Local Government Area into actions enriching the Parramatta Safety Plan.

Research Grant

Awarded to: Dr John Cass

Scheme: Pilot Competitive Evaluation Research Agreement (CERA) Program 2016

Amount: $34,500

Project Title and Summary: An investigation of whether sound can improve visual performance in radar tracking systems

Radar tracking systems require operators to simultaneously keep track of multiple visual objects. This is notoriously difficult. Recent studies show that presenting sounds in synchrony with visual events can profoundly improve visual search performance in relatively static displays. This project investigates whether adding synchronous audio-visual signals can improve motion tracking performance in these systems.

Higher Degree Research student, Amy McNair, has won a place in the Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge Australian Academy of Science

The Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge is a unique national competition for participants to design an innovative start-up business venture. Participants receive entrepreneurial training from business experts. They will then work, over a continuous 24 hour period, in cross-disciplinary teams to develop a novel business venture from their scientific expertise. Each team will pitch their start‑up concept to a jury of expert French and Australian businesses, competing for the opportunity to travel to France for a first-hand experience of the country's innovation system.

Amy McNair is supervised by Assoc Prof Emma Waterton.


Farewell Professor Natalie Bolzan

The School of Social Sciences celebrated the retirement of Professor Natalie Bolzan on 25 May, 2016 at the Female Orphan School, Parramatta Campus. Professor Bolzan was appointed as the University's Margaret Whitlam Chair in Social Work in 2010, which was established to recognise the energy and commitment Mrs Margaret Whitlam AO had demonstrated throughout her career to work for social justice.

Natalie, as the Inaugural Chair, acknowledged the privilege in having the professorial chair named for Margaret Whitlam. Her shared passion for social justice and egalitarian principles underpinned all her academic achievements over the last 20 years in teaching, research, leadership, curriculum development, advocacy and continuing commitment to producing exceptional graduates.

Please see some images of the evening which was attended by many of Professor Bolzan's close colleagues and friends, including a fitting key note from Professor Margaret Alston OAM from Monash and a musical tribute from two of our Social Work Academics, Dr Neil Hall and Dr Justine O'Sullivan. Thank you, as always to Olga Nebot and Designed Photography for the great images.

Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party
Professor Natalie Bolzan's retirement party