Print this page
Submit
Submit

Research within the School


Researchers in the School of Nursing and Midwifery aim to advance research in nursing and midwifery that impacts the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities in Western Sydney and beyond. Our research efforts are focused on high quality, high impact research achieved through productive, engaged research partnerships and the provision of high quality research training for Higher Degree Research students and early career researchers.

SONM researchers work in partnership with State and Federal government, Local Health Districts; private health services; non-government and community organisations and professional bodies, to pursue research activities that accord with local and national health priorities. Our three industry-based research centres work closely with service-users, service providers, managers and policy makers at the local level to transform practice and improve service users’ and staff experiences and outcomes.

Aged Care Research

The Aged Care and Palliation Group undertakes and promotes research for older people and those requiring palliative care.

Aims and Background

Aims:

  • To undertake and promote research for older people and those requiring palliative care
  • To foster positive and quality learning environments for our undergraduate and research staff and students
  • To strengthen our strategic collaboration with our local and international partnerships

Researchers

Collaborators, Affiliations and Partnerships

  • Dr Gisselle Gallego, School of Medicine, Auburn Clinical School, University of Notre Dame

Western Sydney Collaborators

  • Dr Rachel Morley, School of Humanities and Communication Arts
  • Professor Anthony Uhlmann, Writing and Society Research Centre
  • Professor Hazel Smith, Writing and Society Research Centre
  • Dr Melinda Jewell, Writing and Society Research Centre
  • Professor Chris Davis, MARCS Institute
  • Professor Caroline Smith, National Institute for Complementary Medicine
  • Professor Kate Stevens, MARC Institute
  • Professor Janette Perz, School of Medicine
  • Professor Paul Arthur, Digital Humanities Research Group
  • Professor Denis Burnham, MARCS Institute
  • Dr Jason Ensor, Digital Humanities Research Group
  • Dr Rachel Hendery, Digital Humanities Research Group
  • Dr Melinda Jewell, Writing & Society Research Centre

Higher Degree Research Students

  • Maricris Algoso: Exploring the Benefits of Undergraduate Assistant in Nursing (AIN) Employment in Preparing Nursing Students for the Clinical Work Environment.
  • Jasmine Mathew:  Insights into Elder Neglect along the abuse-neglect-exploitation continuum: A multidisciplinary approach to vulnerable and frail elderly.
  • Tiffany Northall:  Factors That Influence Health professional in the Residential Aged Care Placement Process from Hospital.
  • Shyama Ratnayake: Exploring the Experiences of Undergraduate Nursing Students and Curricular Practices on Nutrition with Older People: Mixed Method Study.
  • Beenaselin Michael Vimala:  Explore the knowledge, attitudes and practice of registered nurses regarding the use of physical restraints in hospitalised older people.

Research Projects

  • Ageing Creatively: Creating Writing as a Tool for Healthy Ageing (Pilot 1 - 2015) - to examine how creative writing can promote healthy ageing.
  • Ageing Creatively: Creating Writing as a Tool for Healthy Ageing (Pilot 2 - 2016) - to get a better understanding of the benefits from different types of tools used for creative writing from the participants’ point of view. Use of more tools for gaining participants’ thoughts on the intervention (one-on-one interviews).
  • An Educational Intervention to Improve Health Literacy and Decision making about Supporting Self-advice and Decision making Among Older Australians: A Randomized Controlled Trial’ - to support self-advice and good decision making among older Australians living in retirement village and other aged care facilities.
  • Views and attitudes of older Australians about Self-care complementary medicines - to get a better understanding of the benefits, strengths and limitations of various multi-media used.
  • The use of music in residential aged care facilities - to gain the input of consumers (aged care workers) about how music is being used, situations in which it is most effective or ineffective, and potential barriers to more extensive use of music in their facilities.
  • The implementation and dissemination of the Clinical Frailty Index into routine nursing admission assessment - to allow the early identification of the frail elderly, at the time of admission to hospital, to institute measures to reduce the risk of adverse events during a hospital stay and improve the quality of care.
  • Health professionals' transfer decisions with older people from hospital to residential aged care.
  • FRailty meAsureMEnt in Heart Failure Study (FRAME-HF)

Find out more about the Aged Care Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Recent Publications

Chang, E., Johnson, A. and Hancock, K. (2018), 'Principles for nursing practice: advanced dementia', Living with Chronic Illness and Disability: Principles for Nursing Practice, Elsevier 9780729542616.

Fung, E., Yang, X., Newton, P., Ferguson, C., Gastelurrutia, P., Lupon, J., Bayes-Genis, A., Jha, S., Macdonald, P., (2018), [Letter] by Fung et al regarding article, 'Frailty and clinical outcomes in heart failure : a systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol 19, no 12, pp 1143-1146.

Garrido, S., Dunne, L., Perz, J., Chang, E. and Stevens, C. (2018), '[In Press] The use of music in aged care facilities: a mixed-methods study', Journal of Health Psychology.

Garrido, S., Stevens, C., Chang, E., Dunne, L. and Perz, J. (2018), 'Music and dementia: individual differences in response to personalized playlists', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol 64, no 3 , pp 933 - 941.

Garrido, S., Stevens, C., Chang, E., Dunne, L. and Perz, J. (2018), '[In Press] Musical features and affective responses to personalized playlists in people with probable dementia', American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

Jha, S., Mcdonagh, J., Prichard, R., Newton, P., Hickman, L., Fung, E., Macdonald, P., Ferguson, C. (2018), #Frailty : a snapshot Twitter report on frailty knowledge translation, Australasian Journal on Ageing, vol 37, no 4, pp 309-312.

Johnson, A. and Chang, E. (2018), 'Chronic illness and disability: an overview', Living with Chronic Illness and Disability: Principles for Nursing Practice, Elsevier 9780729542616.

Karacsony, S., Chang, E., Johnson, A., Good, A. and Edenborough, M. (2018), 'Assessing nursing assistants' competency in palliative care: an evaluation tool', Nurse Education in Practice, vol 33 , pp 70 - 76.

Mcdonagh, J., Ferguson, C., Newton, P. (2018), Frailty assessment in heart failure: an overview of the multi-domain approach, Current Heart Failure Reports, vol 15, no 1, pp 17-23.

Rolley, J., Chang, E. and Johnson, A. (2018), 'Spirituality', Living with Chronic Illness and Disability: Principles for Nursing Practice, Elsevier 9780729542616.

Ferguson,  C., Inglis, S., Newton, P., Middleton, S., Macdonald, P., Davidson, P. (2017), 'Multi-morbidity, frailty and self-care: important considerations in treatment with anticoagulation drugs. Outcomes of the AFASTER study'.  European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, vol 16, no 2, pp 113-124.

Jha, S., Mcdonagh, J., Ferguson, C., Macdonald, P., Newton, P. (2017), [Commentary response] : frailty, not just about old people : Reply to Smith GD & Kydd A (2017) Getting care of older people right : the need for appropriate frailty assessment?, Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol 26, no 23, pp e4-e5.

Contact

Chronic Care Research


Together with leading National and International researchers and local industry partners, the School conducts research to address chronic conditions including diabetes, obesity and chronic respiratory disease.

Aims and Background

Aims:

  • To conduct research to address chronic conditions including diabetes, obesity and chronic respiratory disease

Researchers

  • Dr Evan Atlantis, School of Nursing and Midwifery
  • Dr Steve Frost, CANR, School of Nursing and Midwifery
  • Professor Sheree Smith, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University
  • Professor Philip Newton
  • Dr Caleb Ferguson

WSU researchers

  • Associate Professor Federico Girosi, Digital Health Cooperative Research Centre (DHCRC)
  • Associate Professor Kenny Lawson
  • Dr Ramy Bishay – Blacktown Hospital, Western Sydney University
  • Mr Paul Fahey
  • Dr Milan Piya
  • Dr Vincent Ho
  • James Rufus John, PhD

Collaborations

  • Associate Professor Anastasia Hutchinson, Deakin University
  • Dr Rebecca Disler, Centre for Rural Health, University of Melbourne
  • Professor Uma Srinivasan, Digital Health Cooperative Research Centre (DHCRC)
  • Dr Ehsan Zare-Borzeshi, Digital Health Cooperative Research Centre (DHCRC)
  • Dr Shima Ghassem Pour, The University of Sydney
  • Mr Ahmad Aly – Austin Hospital, University of Melbourne
  • Dr Amy Osborne – St. Vincent’s MelbourneProfessor
  • Brian Oldfield – Monash University
  • Professor Gary Wittert – The University of Adelaide
  • Professor Ian Caterson – The University of Sydney
  • Professor John Dixon – Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Swinburne University of Technology
  • Professor Katherine Samaras – St. Vincent’s Hospital Darlinghurst, Garvan Institute of Medical Research
  • Dr Kathryn Williams – Nepean Hospital, The University of Sydney
  • Ms Kellie Fusco – The University of AdelaideDr Lucy Ding – Royal North Shore Hospital
  • Dr Nic Kormas – Campbelltown & Camden Hospitals, Concord Repatriation General Hospital
  • Associate Professor Paul Dugdale – Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory Health Directorate
  • Dr Priya Sumithran – Austin Health Weight Control Clinic, University of Melbourne
  • Associate Professor Samantha Hocking –  Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, The University of Sydney

Program Area 1: Cardiac and vascular health projects

Program Area 2: Chronic conditions and integrated health care projects

  • Patient-centred medical homes model of primary care for improving patient outcomes and reducing the risk of hospitalisation in high risk patients
  • National Association of Clinical Obesity Services (NACOS) research group

Find out more about the Chronic Conditions and Mental Health Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Program Area 3: Lung, Sleep and Hearth Health (LUSH) Projects

  • Beyond forest plots: clinical gestalt and its influence on COPD telemonitoring studies and outcomes
  • Improving Patient Recall in COPD Improving Patient Recall in COPD
  • Pain measurement tools in COPD clinical practice - review of validity, reliability and responsiveness
  • Understanding Response Shift in COPD

Find out more about the Lung, Sleep and Heart Health Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Recent Publications

Alexandrou. E., Mifflin, N., McManus, C., Sou, V., & Frost, S.A. (2018).  Extended dwell peripheral catheters in patients with difficult venous access: Comparison of a peripheral intravenous catheter and midline catheter. Vascular Access, 4 (1), 1-5.

Atlantis E; Nic Kormas; Katherine Samaras; Paul Fahey; Priya Sumithran; Sarah Glastras; Gary Wittert; Kellie Fusco3 Ramy Bishay; Tania Markovic; Lucy Ding; Kathryn Williams; Ian Caterson; Viral Chikani; Paul Dugdale; John Dixon. Clinical Obesity Services in Public Hospitals (COSiPH) in Australia: a position statement based on expert consensus (2018). Clinical Obesity, 8 (3), 203-210.

Atlantis E, Nundlall  N, Fahey P, Kormas N. Efficacy of an intensive lifestyle and medical treatment for severe obesity in the public hospital setting: a case series. ANZOS-OSSANZ-AOCO Joint Annual Scientific Meeting 2017, Adelaide, Australia, 4th - 6th October 2017.

Cheema BS, Davies TB, Stewart M, Papalia S, Atlantis E. (2015) The feasibility and effectiveness of high-intensity boxing training versus moderate-intensity brisk walking in adults with abdominal obesity: A pilot study. BMC Sport Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 7 (1), 3.

Evan Atlantis Fang Lin, Sulak Anandabaskaran, Paul Fahey, Nic Kormas. Predictors of non-completion of an intensive specialist obesity service in a  public hospital: a case-control study, under review.

Gullick J and Smith SMS (2018) Editorial: A call for a stronger articulation of education and role delineation for nurse researchers, International Journal of Nursing Practice published: 03 June 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/ijn.12662

James Rufus John, Shima Ghassempour, Federico Girosi, Evan Atlantis. The effectiveness of patient-centred medical home model versus standard primary care for chronic disease management: a systematic review protocol, Systematic Reviews, in press.

Johnson, A, Smith, SM., (2017) A review of general pain measurement scales and instruments to consider for COPD research International Journal of COPD https://www.dovepress.com/article_31926.t67470324

Lih A, Pereira L, Bishay R, Zang J, Omari A, Atlantis E, Kormas N. (2015) A novel multi-disciplinary intervention for long-term weight loss and glycaemic control in obese patients with diabetes. Journal of Diabetes Research, Volume 2015, Article ID 729567, 7 pages.

Mifflin, N., Sou, V., Alexandrou, E., Stewart, A., & Catt, J. (2017). Paradoxical Electrocardiographic Rhythm During Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Insertion from Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access22(1), 15-18.

Ramachandran D, Atlantis E, Hocking S, Markovic T, Gill T. Standardised baseline data collections in obesity management services in Australia: Recommendations from an expert panel, under review.

Rickard, CM., Marsh, NM., Webster, J., Alexandrou, E., et al. (217). Peripherally InSertedCEntral catheter dressing and Securement: the PISCES Trial. Protocol for a 2x2 factorial, superiority randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open. 7(6),e015291.

Smith, SM., Gullick, J., Ballard, J., Perry, L. (2018) Proposed Clinical Research Support Career Pathway for Non-investigators, International Journal of Nursing Practice published: 08 March 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/ijn.12641

Smith, S.M., Gullick, J., Ballard, J., Perry L. (2018) Clinician Researcher Career Pathway for Registered Nurses and Midwives, International Journal of Nursing Practice published: 25 March 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/ijn.12640

Smith, SM., Chaudhary, K., Blackstock F. (2018) Concordant evidence-based interventions in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation guidelines, Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (Nov 16. doi: 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000359 Epub ahead of print).

Sou, V., McManus, C., Mifflin, N., Frost, S. A., Ale, J., & Alexandrou, E. (2017). A clinical pathway for the management of difficult venous access. BMC Nursing, 16(1), 64.

Contact

Cardiac and vascular health contacts

Chronic conditions and integrated health care contact

Lung, Sleep and Hearth Health (LUSH) contact

Critical Care Research


Critical care research within the School aims to improve the process and experience of Critical Care for patients and their families including translation of evidence to the bedside and patient centred care.

Aims and Background

Aims:

CCRiCeT has two main aims:

  1. Improve the process and experience of Critical Care for patients and their families 2.To build collaborations between researchers (academics) and clinicians and between institutions to facilitate the timely translation of research to the bedside
  2. CCRiCeT aims to improve the care to patients in critical care areas by translation of evidence to the bedside. A patient centred approach that encompasses the whole of critical care experience (admission until discharge) for patients and their families will be used

Background:

The CCRiCeT group came together in October 2015 with the primary aim of bringing together the wealth of experience in Critical Care within the School of Nursing and Midwifery (SONM) at Western Sydney University. The collaboration of academics with clinicians aims to facilitate the ongoing growth of research and ensure the translation of research to areas of clinical need.

Coordination of Critical Care research within the SONM will be based on a unique collaboration of academics and clinicians which traditionally have operated fairly independent of each other. Involving and collaborating with clinicians is a central strategy aimed at fostering the clinician’s ideas for research and identification of research areas of need and supporting them with the academics experience of research proposals, ethics submissions, data analysis and manuscript writing.

A central theorem of CCRiCeT is to build collaborations between clinicians and academics from many centres of care and Universities. It is hoped this collaboration will increase research activity by sharing the research expertise and knowledge of academics with the clinical expertise and knowledge of the clinicians.

The method for achieving high impact research that achieves best practice will include a number of steps:

Identification of areas of clinical need

  • Clinician’s and community representatives will identify areas that require practice improvement
  • Working parties established
  • Evaluation of current evidence undertaken
  • Establish need for further primary research or in case of adequate primary research development evidence based guideline with clinical pathway
  • Educate and implement evidence based practice guidelines

Sharing of ideas and resources between institutions and researchers

  • The pooling of intellectual resources will generate ingenuity for research
  • Collaboration between institutions will increase research outputs in part by providing a larger sample of research participants

Involving key stakeholders in patient care

  • Involving clinicians will directly transfer research findings and best-practice guidelines directly to the bedside

Researchers

  • Professor Martin Christensen, Director CANR
  • Joan Lynch
  • Dr Steve Frost
  • Dr Leanne Hunt,
  • Lauren Metcalfe
  • Dr Cris Algoso
  • Dr Evan Alexandrou
  • Professor Yenna Salamonson
  • Liz Flannery
  • Debra Raymond
  • Dr Paula Sanchez

Collaborators, Affiliations and Partnerships

  • South Western Sydney Local Health District
  • Centre for Applied Nursing Research (CANR)
  • K Brennan, Bankstown ICU
  • G Isdale
  • V Betihavas, The University of Sydney
  • D Sanchez, Campbelltown ICU

Research Projects

  • Pressure injuries amongst adults admitted into Intensive Care - Pressure injuries, represent a common but potentially preventable condition among patients admitted to hospital. Patients at the highest-risk are the elderly, those with physical impairments, and the critically ill. For this reason the prevention of pressure injuries has been identified as an important area of nursing care given to patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU).
  • The Deli Study: Delirium in ICU - Delirium independently contributes to mortality and morbidity of patients in Intensive care and increases hospital length of stay by 10 days. Management of patients with delirium is resource intensive as they often require one-to-one nursing due to restlessness and agitation. Good evidence exists supporting the prevention and early detection as the best way to manage delirium

Find out more about the Critical Care Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

The Collaborative for Innovation in Vascular Access (CIVA)

The Collaborative for Innovation in Vascular Access (CIVA) is a multidisciplinary cooperation of vascular access clinicians, researchers and educators from South Western Sydney Local Health District and beyond.

The group is involved in large international multicentre studies and local studies that include NHMRC funded clinical trials and collaborates with a number of vascular access groups such as The Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research Group (Griffith University), The Australian Vascular Access Society, The Association for Vascular Access (USA) and The World Congress on Vascular Access.

CIVA’s primary goal is to improve the outcomes related to vascular access devices through clinical innovation, education and research.

Some of CIVA’s current work include:

Clinical Innovation:

  • Development of a difficult venous access (DiVa) pathway that has been implemented at Liverpool Hospital and a number of hospitals locally and internationally
  • Use of electrocardiography to navigate and place central venous catheters to negate the need for chest  X ray
  • Development of a venous access pathway for the correct choice of vascular access device
  • Development of ultrasound insertion algorithm for the correct device choice for patients with difficult venous access
  • Use of standard and specialised peripheral catheters as extended dwell devices for patients requiring short to intermediate term intravenous therapy

Researchers:

Associate Professor Evan Alexandrou (Western Sydney University)

Professor Claire Rickard Griffith University

Collaborations:

  • South Western Sydney Local Health District
  • Centre for Applied Nursing Research (CANR)
  • Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research Group (Griffith University)
  • The Australian Vascular Access Society
  • The Association for Vascular Access (USA) and The World Congress on Vascular Access

For further information about CIVA, please contact Evan Alexandrou on 02 9685 9506 or email e.alexandrou@westernsydney.edu.au

Recent Publications

Frost, Steven. A; Hou, Yu Chin; Lombardo, L; Metcalfe, L; Lynch, J.M; Hunt, L; Alexandrou, E; Brennan, K; Sanchez, D; Aneman, A; Christensen, M. (2018). Evidence for the effectiveness of chlorhexidine bathing and health care-associated infections among adult intensive care patients: a trial sequential meta-analysis. BMC Infectious Diseases.

Iyer, Dushyant; Hunt, Leanne; Frost, Steven A; Aneman, Anders. (2018) Daily intra‐abdominal pressure, Sequential Organ Failure Score and fluid balance predict duration of mechanical ventilation. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. 62 (10): 1421–1427.

Alexandrou, Evan; Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Carr, Peter J; Frost, SA; Inwood, Sheila; Higgins, Niall; Lin, Frances; Alberto, Laura; Mermel, Leonard; Rickard, Claire M. (2018) Use of Short Peripheral Intravenous Catheters: Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes Worldwide. Journal of hospital medicine 13 (5).

Chan, B; Butler, E; Frost, SA; Chuan, A; Aneman, A. (2018) Cerebrovascular autoregulJournal of hospital medicineation monitoring and patient‐centred outcomes after cardiac surgery: a systematic review. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. 62 (5): 588-599.

Athari, Fakhri; Hillman, Ken M; Frost, Steven A. (2018) The changing nature of the population of intensive-care patients. Journal of Hospital Administration. 7 (2): 1.

Athari, Fakhri; Hillman, Ken M; Frost, Steven A. (2017) The concept of frailty in intensive care.Australian Critical Care, Elsevier.

Sou V, McManus C, Mifflin N, Frost SA, Ale J, et al. (2017) A clinical pathway for the management of difficult venous access. BMC nursing 16: 64, 1472-6955.

Hunt L, Frost SA, Newton PJ, Salamonson Y, Davidson PM (2017) A survey of critical care nurses’ knowledge of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. Australian Critical Care 30: 21-27 1036-7314.

Etaher A, Saad Y, Nguyen T, Frost S, Shugman I, et al. (2017) Late Mortality Rates of Patients with Type 2 MI Compared to Type 1 MI and Stable Troponin Elevation. Heart, Lung and Circulation 26: S84  1443-9506.

Etaher A, Nguyen T, Saad Y, Frost S, Mussap C, et al. (2017) Late Survival Among Patients≥ 80 Years with Suspected ACS According to High Sensitivity Troponin T Levels. Heart, Lung and Circulation 26: S85 1443-950.

Athari F, Hillman KM, Frost SA (2017) The concept of frailty in intensive care. Australian Critical Care 1036-7314.

Contact

Leanne Hunt

Phone: +61 2 4570 1676

Email: l.hunt@westernsydney.edu.au

Disability: Participation and Social Inclusion Research


Advancing our knowledge, theory and practice to enhance the social inclusion, economic participation and well-being of people living with a disability.

Aims and Background

To advance our knowledge, theory and practice to enhance the social inclusion, economic participation and well-being of people living with a disability. This research group is committed to creating and sustaining ethical and meaningful partnerships between researchers, nurses, individuals and communities to make a positive difference to the lives of people living with a disability.

Vision:

  • Promote an active, collegial research culture in the area of disability
  • Create a scholarly research culture within the School
  • Enable the development of ideas and partnerships
  • Facilitate collaborations between researchers, industry, individuals and communities
  • Develop and expand the evidence base
  • Foster a focussed and sustained research community based on common interests
  • Secure and build on research strengths

Researchers

  • Dr Nathan J Wilson, Senior Lecturer: Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Men's Health, Masculinity Theory, Men's Sheds
  • Dr Peter Lewis, Senior Lecturer: Young people with Chronic Illness, transition to adulthood, effects of chronic illness on life course transitions, experiences of cancer survivorship
  • Ms Kate O'Reilly, TFA: Acquired Brain Injury, Rehabilitation
  • Ms Anne Marks, Lecturer: Type 1 Diabetes, Young People, Transition to Adulthood

Collaborators, Affiliations and Partnerships

Research Projects

  • Assessing the feasibility of a mentoring program for young adults with intellectual disability at a community Men’s Shed (2015-2018) - to see whether a work-skills intergenerational mentoring project at Men’s Sheds for young adults with intellectual disability is feasible and appropriate.
  • Underpinning the development of future disability nursing standards (2017-2018) - to conduct a literature review and exploratory research to underpin the future redevelopment of the PANDDA Standards.
  • Analysis of NSW Family and Community Services client death notification (CDN) database (2017-2018) - to identify where people with intellectual disability die and the relationships between health and service variables at the time of death assists us to determine whether this trend is also common for one of society’s most vulnerable and socially marginalised groups.

Find out more about the Disability: Participation and Social Inclusion Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Recent Publications

How, B., Smidt, A., Wilson, N.J., Barton, R. & Valentin, C. (2018). We would have missed out so much had we terminated: What fathers of a child with Down syndrome think about current non-invasive prenatal testing for Down syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities. DOI: 10.1177/1744629518787606.

Jaques, H., Lewis, P., Wiese, M., O’Reilly, K. & Wilson, N.J. (2018). Understanding the contemporary role of the intellectual disability nurse: A review of the literature. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(21-22), 3858-3871. Doi: 10.1111/jocn.14555.

Lewis, P., Gaffney, R. J. & Wilson, N. J. (2017). A narrative review of acute care nurses’ experiences nursing patients with intellectual disability: Underprepared, communication barriers and ambiguity about the role of caregivers. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(11-12), 1473-1484. doi: 10.1111/jocn.13512.

Wilson, N. J., Jaques, H., Johnson, A. & Brotherton, M. L. (2017). From social exclusion to supported inclusion: Adults with intellectual disability discuss their lived experiences of a structured social group. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 30(5), 847-858. doi: 10.1111/jar.12275.

O’Reilly, K., Lewis, P., Wiese, M., Goddard, L., Trip, H., Conder, J., Charnock, D., Lin, Z., Jaques, H. & Wilson, N.J. (2018). An exploration of the practice, policy and legislative issues of the specialist area of nursing people with intellectual disability: A scoping review. Nursing Inquiry, 25(4). e12258. doi: 10.1111/nin.12258.

Wilson, N.J., Lewis, P., O’Reilly, K., Wiese, M., Lin, Z., Devine, L., Booley, R., Jaques, H. & Goddard, L. (2018).  Reframing the role, identity and standards for practice for registered nurses working in the specialty area of intellectual and developmental disability in Australia: The NDIS and beyond. Collegian. Doi: 10.1016/j.colegn.2018.06.002.

Wilson, N. J., Lin, Z., Villarosa, A. & George, A. (2018).  The oral health status and reported oral health problems in people with intellectual disability: A literature review. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability. doi:  10.3109/13668250.2017.1409596.

Wilson, N. J., Macdonald, J., Hayman, B., Bright, A. M., Frawley, P. & Gallego, G. (2018). A narrative review of the literature about people with intellectual disability who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 22(2), 171-196. doi: 10.1177/1744629516682681.

Wilson, N. J., Smidt, A., & Tehan, M. (2018). Health and social policies for Australian men and boys with intellectual and developmental disability: A health and wellbeing double jeopardy? International Journal of Social and Community Men’s Health, 1(Special Issue 1), e6-e13.

Wilson, N.J., Wiese, M., Lewis, P., Jaques, H, & O’Reilly, K. (Accepted 10th October 2018). Nurses working in intellectual disability-specific settings talk about the uniqueness of their role: A qualitative study. Journal of Advanced Nursing. DOI:10.1111/jan.13898.

Contact

Education and Workforce Research


The Education and Workforce Research (EWER) Group conduct collaborative educational and workplace research projects, including those focussing on academic literacy, student retention, preparedness for the workforce, optimising clinical placement and student engagement.

Aims and Background

Aims:

The EWER network, led by Professor Yenna Salamonson and A/Professor Lucie Ramjan, focuses on health workforce and educational research. Members of this group include academics, students and industry partners with ongoing research collaborations over the years among School academics and students, industry partners, as well as national and international collaborations. In the School of Nursing and Midwifery alone, over 50 academics and research students are undertaking EWER-related research.

It is becoming increasingly crucial for health workforce planning, given the complexity, diversity and impact of maintaining sustainable health workforce for optimal health outcomes. Several collaborative educational research projects are being undertaken, including those focussing on academic literacy, student retention and progression, preparedness for the health workforce, optimising clinical placement and blending learning and students’ academic engagement. Over 50 peer-reviewed publications have been generated by academics and students in the School of Nursing & Midwifery in the area of workforce and educational research in health, in the last 5 years.

The EWER research program area are:

  • Innovation and assessments
  • Clinical experience of nursing students
  • Health workforce
  • Retention and academic success

Researchers

  • Professor Yenna Salamonson
  • Associate Professor Lucie Ramjan

Research Projects

  • Examining Resilience and Grit among Students in Midwifery and Nursing Programs: The ERGATE Project
  • Evaluating the impact of academic support: The Drop-In Support Centre
  • Student Engagement Using Multiple Attempt ‘Weekly Participation Task’ Quizzes (SMAQ)

Find out more about the Education and Workplace Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Recent Publications

Papers:

Martin, M., Ramjan, L. M. Everett, B., Glew, P., Lynch, J., & Salamonson, Y. (2018). Exploring nursing students' experiences of a drop-in support centre: A mixed-methods study. Nurse Education Today, 69: 1-7 DOI:10.1016/j.nedt.2018.06.026.

Salamonson, Y., Priddis, H., Woodmass, J. M., Everett, B., Lynch, J., Curtis, E., & Ramjan, L. M. (Accepted 16 June 2018). The price of journeying towards the prize - Commencing nursing students’ experiences of working and studying: A qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14583.

Conferences:

Hughes, M., Salamonson, Y. & Metcalfe, L. (Under review, Submitted 03 November 2018, Manuscript ID: 2018_734). Student engagement using multiple-attempt ‘Weekly Participation Task’ quizzes with undergraduate nursing students. Nurse Education in Practice.

Martin, M., Salamonson, Y., Ramjan, L., Glew, P., Lynch, J., & Everett, B.. “The Drop-in-Support-Centre: Connecting with academic support, study buddies, and more...” Poster presentation at 2017 ‘Make Change Happen’: The Australian College of Nursing 2017 National Nursing Forum Conference, 21-23 August 2017 | The Star, Sydney, Australia.

Martin, M., Salamonson, Y., Ramjan, L., Glew, P., Lynch, J., & Everett, B.. “The Drop-in-Support-Centre: Connecting with academic support, study buddies, and more...” Poster presentation at 2017 (Reference No: 17566) Students Transitions Achievement Retention & Success (STARS) Conference, 2-5 July 2017 | Stamford Grand Adelaide, Australia.

Metcalfe, L., Salamonson, Y., & Hughes, M. | Using multiple-attempt ‘weekly participation task’quizzes with undergraduate nursing students.| Poster presentation, NNEC 2018: 17th National Nurse Education Conference held 1-4 May 2018 at Melbourne, Victoria, Crown Promenade, Melbourne, Australia.

Metcalfe, L., Salamonson, Y., & Hughes, M. | Student engagement using multiple-attempt ‘weekly participation task’quizzes.| Oral presentation, NNEC 2018: 17th National Nurse Education Conference held 1-4 May 2018 at Melbourne, Victoria, Crown Promenade, Melbourne, Australia.

Priddis, H., Sheehan, A., Koch, J., Lynch, J., Curtis, E., Gregory-Wilson, R., & Salamonson, Y. “Examining Resilience and Grit among Students in Midwifery & Nursing Programs: The ERGATE Project?” Poster-Oral presentation at 2016 Students Transitions Achievement Retention & Success (STARS) Conference, 29 June - 2 July 2016 | Pan Pacific Perth, Australia.

Contact

Mental Health Research


Research into mental health is a priority in the School and is evidenced through projects that  address mental health across the lifespan and within the community and mental health facilities.

Aims and Background

Aims:

  • To address mental health across the lifespan within the community and mental health facilities.

Researchers

Higher Degree Research Students

  • Leone Pike:  Suicide risk assessment and follow up care: experiences of Mental Health Nurses.
  • Bridgit Philip: Understanding perinatal mental health in Indian-born immigrant women and men: A mixed methods study.
  • Jaskaran Singh: What impact does inpatient aggression/violence have on physical and psychological wellbeing of mental health clients who experience this aggression while staying in-patient mental health settings?
  • Mark Wilburn:  Intention to Pursue a Career in Mental Health Nursing Among Undergraduate Students (Intent) Project.

Research Projects

  • Community Attitudes toward the Mentally Ill (CAMI) among culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community attitudes towards people with mental illness.
  • Validating the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale to measure Arabic community attitudes towards people with mental illness.
  • Validating the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale to measure Arabic community attitudes towards people with mental illness.
  • Narratives of Family Members of People Who Die as a Result of Suicide.
  • Mentoring - A Novel Approach to Support Hope for Recovery in People with Eating Disorders.
  • Effectiveness of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Bibliotherapy among Young PeoplE with CanceR: The EMBER Project
  • Perinatal mental health projects

Find out more about the Mental Health Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Contact

Mother, Infant & Family (MIFam) Research

MIFam works with women, families and health and community groups to research and facilitate positive health outcomes for women in pregnancy, birth, the postnatal and early parenting.

Aims and Background

Aims:

The Mother Infant and Family Health Research Network (The MIFam Network) works collaboratively with women, families and health and community groups to research and facilitate positive health outcomes for women in pregnancy, birth, the postnatal and early parenting.

MIFam is led by Professor Virginia Schmied and Professor Hannah Dahlen and has a strong presence in Sydney's west, working with women, families, health and community groups as well as with national and international researchers. Our research embraces the diversity of cultures and their experiences.

MIFam research program areas:

  1. Improving pregnancy birth experiences and outcomes
  2. Social and emotional health in the perinatal period
  3. Promoting healthy parenting and infant feeding practices
  4. Improving care and outcomes for premature or sick infants and their families
  5. Investigating service system design, models of care and professional education

Researchers

Co-leaders

Members

NamePosition
Professor Lyn Kemp Leader - TReSI group
Associate Professor Athena Sheehan Director of Academic Program Midwifery
Associate Professor Karleen Gribble Honorary associate
Dr Elaine Burns Senior Lecturer (Midwifery)
Dr Holly Priddis Lecturer (Midwifery
Fiona Arundell DAP Midwifery, Lecturer & PhD Candidate
Hazel Keedle Lecturer and PhD Candidate
Dr Margie Duff Honorary Research Associate
Dr Rebecca O'Reilly Senior Lecturer
Dr Suza Trajkovski Lecturer
Dr Ajesh George Associate Professor and Director COHORT
Dr Jann Foster Senior Lecturer
Dr Christine Taylor Senior Lecturer
Dr Rakime Elmir Lecturer
Dr Kim Psaila Lecturer
Dr Olayide Ogunsiji Senior Lecturer
Dr Diana Jefferies Senior Lecturer
Dr Stacy Blythe Senior Lecturer
Dr Charlene Thornton Senior Research Associate

Western Sydney Collaborators

  • Professor Pranee Liamputtong
  • Associate Professor Alphia Possamai-Inesedy
  • Professor Caroline Smith
  • Prof Phillipa Hay
  • Dr Kate Huppatz
  • Prof Andrew Gorman-Murray
  • Prof Amanda Third
  • Dr Ann Dadich
  • Prof Janette Perz
  • Prof Jane Ussher
  • A/Prof Kenny Lawson
  • Nicole Bridges

Higher Degree Research Students

  • Alison Teate
  • Elizabeth Rigg
  • Hilary Gatward
  • Hazel Keedle
  • Shu-Fei Yang
  • Sahar Sobhgol
  • Jeni Stevens
  • Maddy Simpson
  • Titare Phanwichatkul
  • Phillipa Conroy (Mann)
  • Bridgit Philip
  • Suha Hussein
  • Leonie Hewett

Masters Research Students

  • Jenni Doust

Collaborators, Affiliations and Partnerships

International Collaborators, Affiliations and Partnerships

  • Professor Fiona Dykes (UClan)
  • Associate Professor Gill Thomson (UClan)
  • Professor Soo Downe (UClan)
  • Professor Holly Powell Kennedy, Yale University, USA
  • Professor Debra Bick (Kings College London)
  • Associate Professor Ank de Jong
  • Dr Lillian Peters (Netherlands)
  • Professor Christine Rubertsson
  • Professor Wendy Boucher
  • Dr Patricia Leahy-Warren
  • Associate Professor Renee Flacking, Dalana University, Sweden
  • Joanna Briggs Institute

Industry Partners

  • Karitane
  • NSW Ministry of Health
  • Liverpool Hospital Women's and Children's Health South West Sydney LHD
  • Children's Hospital, Westmead
  • South West Sydney LHD Community Health
  • Western Sydney LHD Community Health
  • Western Sydney Local Health District
    • Blacktown Hospital
    • Westmead Hospital
    • WSLHD Community Health
  • Nepean Hospital NBLHD
  • Life's Little Treasures Foundation, Melbourne
  • Newborn and paediatric Emergency Transport Service (NETS)
  • Community Migrant Resource Centre
  • NSW Refugee Health
  • Parramatta City Council
  • St John of God Raphael Centre
  • Cumberland Hospital
  • NSW Pregnancy & Newborn Services Network
  • The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne
  • Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
  • Wollongong Hospital
  • Blacktown Migrant Resource Centre
  • John Hunter Hospital
  • Westmead Children's Hospital
  • Australian College of Midwives
  • Ingham Institute
  • Holroyd Council

Research Projects

Program Area 1: Improving pregnancy birth experiences and outcomes

'Keeping birth normal’ is a key policy platform within NSW Ministry of Health. Our research focuses on the facilitators and inhibitors of normal birth and on reducing unnecessary interventions and health complications in birth. This work also includes women who have poor health or medical complications in pregnancy such as gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders, or health problems after birth such as severe perineal trauma.

Current and recent completed studies includes:

  • Analysis of linked data to determine the rate of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with commonly performed pregnancy and birth interventions
  • Characteristics, trends, co-admissions and service needs of women admitted to residential parenting services in the year following giving birth in NSW
  • Epigenetic Influence and impact on childbirth (EPIIC) – a new international collaboration (Australia, UK and USA) dedicated to studying how common interventions and environmental factors around the time of birth may have an epigenetic impact on the mother and child
  • Does using a peanut ball during labour with an epidural affect birth outcomes? A pilot study
  • Sterile water injections for relief of back pain in labour – a qualitative study
  • Midwives’ perspectives and experiences of obstetric emergencies
  • Midwifery Initiated Oral Health NHMRC funded - TRESI

Higher Degree Research Student Projects (Current and Recently completed)

  • Interactions between midwives and women during antenatal consultations in different midwifery models of care (NSW Health and WSU RGS grant) (Ali Teate doctoral student)
  • Women’s reasons for and experiences of choosing a homebirth following a caesarean section  (Hazel Keedle doctoral student)
  • The role of Unregulated Birthworker in Australia from the perspective of workers and women (Elizabeth Rigg doctoral student)
  • Jordanian women’s experiences of episiotomy and related birth interventions – an intergenerational and inter-country study (Suha Hussein doctoral student)
  • The effect of pelvic floor muscle exercise on female sexual function in pregnancy and postpartum (PhD) Sahar Sobhgol
  • Understanding the development of postnatal posttraumatic stress disorder following childbirth and its impact on women who access residential parenting services in NSW (Maddie Simpson)
  • Managing midwifery group practices (Leonie Hewitt)

Collaborative research:

  • The Place of Birth led by University of Technology, Sydney (NHMRC funded)

Maridulu Budyari Gumal - The Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise (SPHERE) New South Wales. MIFam members are part of teams on several projects related to Program 5 that MIFam including:

  • SPERE CAG stream:  Maternal, Newborn and Women’s Health
  • Timing of birth: Right time, right place, right choice
  • SPHERE CAG stream: DOMS: Stemming the Tide: Better Health Outcomes in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease
  • Pre-pregnancy planning and contraception in women aged ≤25 years with pre-existing diabetes

Find out more about the research projects within the improving pregnancy birth experiences and outcomes program area.

Program Area 2: Social and emotional health in the perinatal period

Early identification and assessment of women and families with complex needs including mental health problems, domestic violence and drug and alcohol issues is becoming increasingly important. Our work in this area is examining how midwives and child and family health nurses identify and respond to women and families with complex social and emotional needs, examining effective service pathways and outcomes for women, infants and families. We have a specific interest in understanding how culture influences understandings of mental health issues in the perinatal period.

Current and recently completed studies include:

  • Characteristics, trends, co-admissions and service needs of women admitted to residential parenting services in the year following giving birth in NSW
  • The Perinatal Journey: The process and impact of psychosocial assessment
  • Opportunistic screening for domestic violence by community health care providers for peri-natal women
  • Tackling maternal anxiety: reconceptualising the mothering narrative
  • Fathers’ experiences of traumatic birth
  • Women's experience of pregnancy, birth and the perinatal period following an eating disorder

Student Projects (recent completed and current):

  • Understanding perinatal mental health in Indian-born immigrant women and men: A mixed methods study - Bridgit Philip
  • Understanding the development of postnatal posttraumatic stress disorder following childbirth and its impact on women who access residential parenting services in NSW - Maddie Simpson
  • Refugee women’s experiences of  becoming a parent in a new country: a meta-ethnographic study - Jackie Pangas

Collaborative research:

  • A comparative effectiveness trial of integrated psychosocial assessment in the perinatal period led by the UNSW and St John of God Health Care

Find out more about the research projects within the social and emotional health in the perinatal period.

Program Area 3: Promoting healthy infant feeding and parenting practices

For over a decade our team and collaborators have studied the the transition to parenthood and the social and cultural context of infant feeding decisions in Australia and the impact of professional practice (including midwives, child and family health nurses, and lactation consultants), organisational culture and policies on breastfeeding decisions. Studies have included: interactions between midwives and lactation consultants around breastfeeding with women in postnatal units; implementation of the Baby Friendly Health Initiative, and breastfeeding support.

Current and recently completed studies include:

  • Mother-Infant Caring Communities: designing strategies to improve community support for breastfeeding.
  • A ‘known’ midwife or another mother: a study of professional and peer support provided to breastfeeding women during the first month after birth
  • Best Beginnings Mother to mother breastfeeding support: designing a professional and peer partnership model
  • Breastfeeding Friendly Communities at WSU
  • Infant feeding in foster care
  • Volunteering in infant and young child feeding in emergencies (IYCF-E) in the European Refugee Crisis Audit of Australian Federal, State/Territory and Local Government Area plans and guidance for content related to infant and young child feeding in emergencies (IYCF-E) es
  • Parenting experiences of refugee mothers and fathers in New South Wales, Australia.
  • Belonging in two families: exploring permanence options for children in   out-of-home care
  • Content analysis of foster carer recruitment materials in NSW
  • WECDI project: A collaborative approach to optimise child development in western Sydney: a study of community perspectives and needs

Student Projects (recently completed and current)

  • Facilitators and barriers to skin to skin contact following elective caesarean section (Jeni Stevens – doctoral student - completed)
  • Health promoting practices of Burmese migrant women living in Thailand (Titaree Phanwichatkul - doctoral student - completed)
  • Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students in Taiwan: The BONUS Project (Shu Fei Yang - doctoral student.
  • The role and practice of lactation consultants in Australia  (Jen Hocking – doctoral student)

Collaborative projects

Maridulu Budyari Gumal - The Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise (SPHERE) - is an integrated health science network of global significance in New South Wales. MIFam members are part of teams on several projects related to Program 5 that MIFam including:

SPERE Early Life Determinants of Health (CAG stream)

  • Supporting Children with Complex fEEding Difficulties (SuCCEED) Study
  • Understanding the Determinants of Refugee Emotional Health; a Comprehensive School and Preschool-Based Study

Find out about the promoting healthy infant feeding and parenting practices projects

Program Area 4: Improving care and outcomes for premature or sick infants and their families

Projects within the program area include:

  • Continuity of care(CoC) for parents whose infants required admission to neonatal intensive care (NICU) for a congenital anomaly: perceptions of families and health professionals.
  • Feeding transition in preterm infantS: unravelling the mystery (The travel study)
    • Tube feeding and feed transition practice in special care nurseries
    • Experiences of parents of infants in the NICU, SCN and following hospital discharge: An online survey
    • A qualitative exploration of the experiences of parents of infants in the NICU, SCN and following hospital discharge
  • An exploration of caregivers' feeding experiences of children with Cerebral Palsy (The CareFed-CP Study)
  • The experiences of migrant/refugee families experiencing NICU services

Student projects

  • Neonatal nurses perceptions of facilitating closeness between parents and infants with a congenital abnormality  Hannah Olley
  • Co-bedding of twins in the neonatal period – Philippa Mann

Collaborative research:

  • Feeding, growth, and developmental outcomes in Infants with congenital heart disease
  • Care of the late preterm infant in the postnatal setting

Find out more about the improving care and outcomes for premature or sick infants and their families program area.

Program Area 5: Investigating service system design, models of care and professional education

A key aim of the work conducted with in MIFam is to improve service design, delivery and professional practice. In particular, our research addresses how service design and organisational culture impact on evidence-based practice, service quality and on professional-client interactions and relationships and in turn, how these shape the experiences and decisions of women and their families. This program of work also focuses on improving teaching and learning experiences of midwifery and nursing students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Current and recently completed studies:

  • Mothers and Postnatal Care @ Blacktown (MAPcare)
  • Child Health: Researching Universal Services (CHoRUS): A study to investigate the feasibility of implementing a national approach to child and family health services (ARC linkage)
  • Improving postnatal processes, & pathways (POPPY) (WSU partnership grant)
  • WECDI project: A collaborative approach to optimise child development in western Sydney: a study of community perspectives and needs
  • Implementation of sustained nurse home visiting

Improving education for undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery and nursing students

Find out about the investigating service system design, models of care and professional education research projects

Publications

Edited Text book

  • Pairman, S., Tracy, S., Dahlen, H.G., Dixon, L. (2018). Midwifery Preparation for Practice (4e) Elsevier

Refereed articles 2017-2018

2019

  • Smith, C., Sabe, Z., Galbally, M., Schmied, V. and Dahlen, H. (2019), 'The effect of complementary medicines and therapies on maternal anxiety and depression in pregnancy : a systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol 245 , pp 428 - 439.

2018

  • Rigg, E.C., Schmied, S., Peters, K., Dahlen, H.G. (2018). A survey of women in Australia who choose the care of unregulated birthworkers for a birth at home. Women and Birth. In press.
  • Pangas, J., Ogunsiji, O., Elmir, R., Raman, S., Liamputtong, P., Burns, E., Dahlen., H.G., Schmied, V. (2018). Refugee women’s experiences negotiating motherhood and maternity care in a new country: A meta-ethnographic review. International Journal Nursing Studies. In press.
  • Ajwani, S., Sousa, M.S., Villarosa, A.C., Bhole, S., Johnson, M., Dahlen, H.G., Hoolsema, J., Blinkhorn, A., Srinivas, R., Yaacoub, A., Milat, A., Skinner, J., George., A. (2018). Process Evaluation of the Midwifery Initiated Oral Health‐Dental Service Program: Perceptions of dental professionals. Health Promotion Journal of Australia. In press.
  • Keedle, H., Schmied, V., Burns, E. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'The journey from pain to power : a meta-ethnography on women's experiences of vaginal birth after caesarean', Women and Birth, vol 31, no 1 , pp 69 - 79.
  • Keedle, H., Schmied, V., Burns, E. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'The design, development, and evaluation of a qualitative data collection application for pregnant women', Journal of Nursing Scholarship, vol 50, no 1 , pp 47 - 55.
  • Ormsby, S., Dahlen, H., Ee, C., Keedle, H. and Smith, C. (2018), ''Acupuncture for antenatal depression : it's worth giving it a go' : a qualitative study', Women and Birth, vol 31, no 3 , pp 166 - 176.
  • Rossiter, C., Fowler, C., Hesson, A., Kruske, S., Homer, C. S. E., Kemp, L., & Schmied, V. (2018). Australian parents’ experiences with universal child and family health services. Collegian. doi:10.1016/j.Collegian.2018.09.002
  • Rossiter, C., Fowler, C., Hesson, A., Kruske, S., Homer, C. S. E., & Schmied, V. Australian parents’ use of universal child and family health services: A consumer survey. Health & Social Care in the Community, 0(0). doi:doi:10.1111/hsc.1266
  • Bridges, N., Howell, G., & Schmied, V. (2018a). Breastfeeding peer support on social Networking sites. Breastfeeding Review, 26(2), 17-27.
  • Bridges, N., Howell, G., & Schmied, V. (2018b). Exploring breastfeeding support on social media. International Breastfeeding Journal, 13(1). doi:10.1186/s13006-018-0166-9
  • Fogarty, S., Elmir, R., Hay, P., & Schmied, V. (2018). The experience of women with an eating disorder in the perinatal period: A meta-ethnographic study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 18(1). doi:10.1186/s12884-018-1762-9
  • Priddis, H., Keedle, H. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'The perfect storm of trauma : the experiences of women who have experienced birth trauma and subsequently accessed residential parenting services in Australia', Women and Birth, vol 31, no 1 , pp 17 - 24.
  • Hussein, S., Dahlen, H., Ogunsiji, O. and Schmied, V. (2018), 'Women's experiences of childbirth in Middle Eastern countries : a narrative review', Midwifery, vol 59 , pp 100 - 111.
  • Ormsby, S., Dahlen, H. and Smith, C. (2018), 'Women's experiences of having depression during pregnancy and receiving acupuncture treatment: a qualitative study', Women and Birth, vol 31, no 6 , pp 469 - 478.
  • Levett, K., Dahlen, H., Smith, C., Finlayson, K., Downe, S. and Girosi, F. (2018), 'Cost analysis of the CTLB Study, a multitherapy antenatal education programme to reduce routine interventions in labour', BMJ Open, vol 8, no 2 .
  • Simpson, M., Schmied, V., Dickson, C. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'Postnatal post-traumatic stress : an integrative review', Women and Birth, vol 31, no 5 , pp 367 - 379.
  • Thornton, C., Dahlen, H. and Hennessy, A. (2018), 'Does induction of labour in nulliparous hypertensive women result in vaginal birth? : a descriptive study utilising birth registry data', Pregnancy Hypertension, vol 12 , pp 16 - 22.
  • George, A., Dahlen, H., Blinkhorn, A., Ajwani, S., Bhole, S., Ellis, S., Yeo, A., Elcombe, E. and Johnson, M. (2018), 'Evaluation of a midwifery initiated oral health-dental service program to improve oral health and birth outcomes for pregnant women : a multi centre randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol 82 , pp 49 - 57.
  • Smith, C., Levett, K., Collins, C., Armour, M., Dahlen, H. and Suganuma, M. (2018), 'Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour [Intervention review]', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol 3 .
  • Smith, C., Levett, K., Collins, C., Dahlen, H., Ee, C. and Suganuma, M. (2018), 'Massage, reflexology and other manual methods for pain management in labour [Intervention Review]', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol 2018, no 3 .
  • Scarf, V., Rossiter, C., Vedam, S., Dahlen, H., Ellwood, D., Forster, D., Foureur, M., McLachlan, H., Oats, J., Sibbritt, D., Thornton, C. and Homer, C. (2018), 'Maternal and perinatal outcomes by planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies in high-income countries : a systematic review and meta-analysis', Midwifery, vol 62 , pp 240 - 255.
  • Peters, L., Thornton, C., De Jonge, A., Khashan, A., Tracy, M., Downe, S., Feijen-de Jong, E. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'The effect of medical and operative birth interventions on child health outcomes in the first 28 days and up to 5 years of age : a linked data population-based cohort study', Birth, vol 45, no 4 , pp 347 - 357.
  • Dahlen, H., Munoz, A., Schmied, V. and Thornton, C. (2018), 'The relationship between intimate partner violence reported at the first antenatal booking visit and obstetric and perinatal outcomes in an ethnically diverse group of Australian pregnant women : a population-based study over 10 years', BMJ Open, vol 8, no 4 .
  • Myors, K. A., Cleary, M., Johnson, M., & Schmied, V. (2018). ‘Modelling a Secure-Base’ for Women with Complex Needs: Attachment-Based Interventions Used by Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Clinicians. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 39(3), 226-232. doi:10.1080/01612840.2017.1378784
  • Phanwichatkul, T., Burns, E., Liamputtong, P., & Schmied, V. (2018). The experiences of Burmese healthcare interpreters (Iam) in maternity services in Thailand. Women and Birth, 31(3), e152-e161. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2017.09.011
  • Yang, S. F., Salamonson, Y., Burns, E., & Schmied, V. (2018). Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of health professional students: A systematic review. International Breastfeeding Journal, 13(1). doi:10.1186/s13006-018-0153-1
  • Yang, S. F., Schmied, V., Burns, E., Brodribb, W., & Salamonson, Y. (2018). Validation of the Chinese Version of the Australian Breastfeeding Attitude Questionnaire. Journal of Human Lactation. doi:10.1177/0890334418761567
  • Yang, S. F., Schmied, V., Burns, E., & Salamonson, Y. (2018). Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students in Taiwan: A cohort study. Women and Birth. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.167
  • Priddis, H., Thornton, C., Fowler, C., Schmied, V., Tooher, J., Dickinson, M. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'Characteristics and service needs of women and babies admitted to residential parenting units in New South Wales : a mixed methods study', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol 27, no 15-16 , pp 2963 - 2973.
  • Thornton, C. and Dahlen, H. (2018), 'Born before arrival in NSW, Australia (2000-2011) : a linked population data study of incidence, location, associated factors and maternal and neonatal outcomes', BMJ Open, vol 8, no 3 .
  • Dahlen, H., Foster, J., Psaila, K., Spence, K., Badawi, N., Fowler, C., Schmied, V. and Thornton, C. (2018), 'Gastro-oesophageal reflux : a mixed methods study of infants admitted to hospital in the first 12 months following birth in NSW (2000-2011)', BMC Pediatrics, vol 18 .
  • Dahlen, H., Johnson, M., Hoolsema, J., Patterson Norrie, T., Ajwani, S., Blinkhorn, A., Bhole, S., Ellis, S., Srinivas, R., Yaacoub, A., Milat, A., Skinner, J. and George, A. (2018), '[In Press] Process evaluation of the midwifery initiated oral health-dental service program : perceptions of midwives in Greater Western Sydney, Australia', Women and Birth.
  • Hewitt, L., Priddis, H. and Dahlen, H. (2018), '[In Press] What attributes do Australian midwifery leaders identify as essential to effectively manage a Midwifery Group Practice?', Women and Birth.
  • Cole, L., LeCouteur, A., Feo, R. and Dahlen, H. (2018), '[In Press] "Trying to give birth naturally was out of the question" : accounting for intervention in childbirth', Women and Birth, In Press. .
  • Rigg, E., Schmied, V., Peters, K. and Dahlen, H. (2018), '[In Press] The role, practice and training of unregulated birth workers in Australia : a mixed methods study', Women and Birth. In Press.
  • Fox D, Sheehan A, Homer C, 2018, Birthplace in Australia : processes and interactions during the intrapartum transfer of women from planned homebirth to hospital, Midwifery, vol 57, pp 18-25, [REDI ID: 250740]
  • Arundell F, Mannix J, Sheehan A, Peters K, 2018, Workplace culture and the practice experience of midwifery students : a meta-synthesis, Journal of Nursing Management, vol 26, no 3, pp 302-313, [REDI ID: 250141]

Conversation articles 2018

  • Contributor to: We asked five experts: should all women do pelvic floor exercises? https://theconversation.com/we-asked-five-experts-should-all-women-do-pelvic-floor-exercises-95444
  • Dahlen, H., Schmied, V. (April 26th 2018) Pregnant women are at increased risk of domestic violence in all cultural groups https://theconversation.com/pregnant-women-are-at-increased-risk-of-domestic-violence-in-all-cultural-groups-95048
  • Dahlen, H. (April 12th 2018). So your birth didn’t go to plan? Don’t blame yourself. https://theconversation.com/so-your-birth-didnt-go-according-to-plan-dont-blame-yourself-89155
  • Dahlen, H. Peters, L. (March 26th 2018). How birth interventions affect babies’ health in the short and long term. https://theconversation.com/how-birth-interventions-affect-babies-health-in-the-short-and-long-term-93426
  • Dahlen, H. Thornton, C. (March 15th 2018). What to do when the baby is born before you get to hospital. https://theconversation.com/what-to-do-when-the-baby-is-born-before-you-get-to-hospital-84281
  • Barclay, L., Dahlen, H., Lee, N. (August 15th 2018). Australian is breaking records for intervention in childbirth, and the costs are many. https://croakey.org/australia-is-breaking-records-for-intervention-in-childbirth-and-the-costs-are-many/

Contact

Oral Health Outcomes & Research Translation


The Centre for Oral Health Outcomes and Research Translation (COHORT) is the first research centre of its kind in Australia and focuses on interdisciplinary oral health and capacity building and training non-oral health professionals and undergraduate students in providing oral health education, screening and referrals to their patients.

Aims and Background

Poor oral health can have a negative impact on various systematic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Unfortunately the majority of the population are unaware of the impact of poor oral health on systemic health and seldom seek dental care. Oral health is also often neglected in general clinical practice and patient care in Australia.

To address this it is now recommended that non-oral health professionals such as nurses, midwives and doctors play a more active role in promoting oral health among their patients. To facilitate this, South Western Sydney Local Health District Oral Health Service and the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Western Sydney University have formed the Centre for Oral Health Outcomes & Research Translation (COHORT); a new and innovative research centre affiliated with, and located within, the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research.

Researchers and Support Staff

  • Associate Professor Ajesh George, Co-Founder and Research Director of COHORT
  • Ravi Srinivas, Co-Founder and Director of Oral Health Services, SWSLHD
  • Dr Martina Sousa, Senior Research Officer
  • Amy Villarosa, Research Officer
  • Ariana Villarosa, Research Assistant and PhD Student
  • Rinu Mathew, Research Administrative Assistant
  • Paula Sanchez, PhD Student
  • Prakesh Poudel, PhD Student
  • Tiffany Patterson Norrie, PhD Student
  • Nidhi Saraswat, PhD Student
  • Fakhra Maan, MRes Student

Collaborators, Affiliates and Partners

  • Nathan Wilson, Senior Lecturer, Western Sydney University
  • Kylie Smidt, Quality and Patient Officer, Oral Health Services, SWSLHD
  • Cynthia Valderrama, Senior Oral Health Therapist, SWSLHD
  • Caleb Ferguson, Senior Research Fellow, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University
  • Lien Lombardo, Clinical Nurse Consultant - Research Coordinator, SWSLHD
  • Della Maneze, Multicultural Health Promotion Officer, SWSLHD
  • Angela Masoe, Adjunct Fellow, Western Sydney University

Research Projects

The COHORT research streams current projects are:

Oral health in pregnancy

  • The Midwifery-Initiated Oral Health (MIOH) Program
  • Implementing and evaluating an oral health module for the WSU Bachelor of Midwifery program (BMIOH)
  • Developing perinatal oral health guidelines for Dentists and prenatal care providers (PERIOH)

Paediatric oral health

  • Reducing dental decay in young children through an antenatal intervention: A longitudinal cohort study of MIOH kids (MIOH kids)
  • Designing, implementing and evaluating an online early childhood oral health module (ECOH-M) for the Masters of Family Health at Western Sydney University
  • Developing a Dietitian Initiated program for oral health and eating disorders

Oral health of Aboriginal people

  • The Gudaga and Bulundidi Gudaga Projects
  • Capacity building Aboriginal health workers in oral health promotion: A new model of care for Indigenous pregnant women

Oral health and cardiovascular health and stroke

  • Developing a cardiovascular oral health program: a mixed methods study (CARDIOH)
  • Integrated dental care after stroke (IDeaS)

Oral health and cancer

  • Assessing the oral cancer risk behaviours of Indian immigrants in Australia

Oral health and diabetes

  • Developing a diabetes oral health program: A mixed methods study (DIOH)

Oral health, ageing and palliative care

  • Developing, implementing and evaluating a palliative oral health program for patients in South Western Sydney (PALLIOH)
  • Improving oral health outcomes for people living with disability and in residential care facilities (ACOH)

Oral health and disability

  • Improving oral health outcomes of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Find out more about the Oral Health Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Recent Publications

Ajwani, S., Jayanti, S., Burkolter, N., Anderson, C., Bhole, S., Itaoui, R. and George, A. (2017), ‘Integrated oral health care for stroke patients : a scoping review’, Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 26, pp. 891-901.

Duff, M., Dahlen, H., Burns, E., Priddis, H., Schmied, V. and George, A. (2017), ‘Designing an oral health module for the Bachelor of Midwifery program at an Australian university’, Nurse Education in Practice, vol. 23, pp. 76 – 81.

George, A., Dahlen, H., Blinkhorn, A., Ajwani, S., Bhole, S., Ellis E., Yeo, A., Elcome, E., Johnson, M. (2018), ‘Evaluation of a midwifery initiated oral health-dental service program to improve oral health and birth outcomes for pregnant women: A Multi Centre Randomised Controlled Trial’, International Journal of Nursing Studies, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.03.006.

George, A., Ajwani, S., Bhole, S., Dahlen, H., Reath, J., Korda, A., Ng Chok, H., Miranda, C., Villarosa, A. and Johnson, M. (2017), ‘Knowledge, attitude and practices of dentists towards oral health care during pregnancy : a cross-sectional survey in New South Wales, Australia’, Australian Dental Journal, vol. 62, pp. 301-310.

Sanchez, P., Everett, B., Salamonson, Y., Ajwani, S. and George, A. (2017), ‘Oral healthcare and cardiovascular disease : a scoping review of current strategies and implications for nurses’, Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, vol. 32, no. 3, E10-E20.

Villarosa, AC., Villarosa, AR., Salamonson, Y., Ramjan, LM., Sousa, MS., Srinivas, R., Jones, N., George, A., (2018) The role of Indigenous health workers in promoting oral health during pregnancy: A scoping review. BMC Public Health 18:381.

Contact

Translational Research and Social Innovation (TReSI)


TReSI conducts translational research that develops and supports implementation of social and system innovations.

Aims and Background

Aims:

TReSI undertakes research on understanding the processes for community-based delivery to whole populations at scale. Currently TReSI's work is focused on early childhood services, and developing research methods and frameworks for translational research. These methods have wide application and are being explored for issues ranging from nurse home visiting, volunteering, cancer treatments, to health policy implementation. TReSI was established in 2015 and is based at the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research in Liverpool.

TReSI aims to conduct translational research that develops and supports the implementation of social and system innovations that ensure evidence-based interventions reach the people who need them, and are implemented with quality.

Researchers and Collaborations

  • Professor Lynn Kemp - Director
  • Dr Rebekah Grace - Deputy Director
  • Cheryl Anderson - Research Officer
  • Dr Kelly Baird - Associate Research Fellow
  • Tracey Bruce - MECSH Implementation Nurse Consultant
  • Natasha Bucknall - Research Officer
  • Fiona Byrne - Research Officer
  • Kathy Donohoe - Research Assistant
  • Emma Elcombe - Senior Research Officer, Statistical Analyst
  • Janice Hopkins - MECSH Implementation Nurse Specialist
  • Dr Cathy Kaplun - Research Fellow
  • Fakhra Maan - EA to Director
  • Sheryl Scharkie - Research Officer
HDR Students
  • Phillip Good – Children as health ambassadors: An approach to improving health, wellbeing and learning outcomes for Australian Indigenous children and communities -PhD
  • Kate Jones - Measuring multilingual children’s early vocabulary using the OZI SF - M Phil
  • Samia Michail - Child voice mechanisms for children at risk in NSW – PhD
  • Karen Menzies – Understanding the frameworks of welfare practitioners working with Aboriginal families in the NSW child protection sector - PhD
  • Bridgit Phillip - Constructions of perinatal mental health amongst recent Indian immigrants to Australia: a mixed method study - PhD
  • Kate Short - The variability in vulnerable children’s communication development over time and the impact of treatment - PhD

Collaborations

  • The Benevolent Society
  • Carers NSW
  • COHORTE, Western Sydney University
  • Curran Public School
  • The Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research
  • Karitane
  • malpa
  • Save the Children Australia
  • South Western Sydney Local Health District
  • Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation
  • Their Futures Matter, NSW Government
  • Uniting
  • Winangay

Research Projects

  • Sustained nurse home visiting for culturally and linguistically diverse families with limited English language proficiency.
  • Reconceptualising the Service System from the Perspectives of Experienced Children and Teens (ReSPECT)
  • Working with Curran Public School in Macquarie Fields for the past year, to support their student-developed and student-led transition to school program
  • Volunteer Family Connect (VFC) Program
  • Bulundidi Gadaga
  • Maternal Early Childhood Sustained Home-visiting (MESCH) Program.

Find out more about the Translational Research and Social Innovation Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Contact

Phone: +61 2 8738 9387

Women's Health Research


Promoting screening in Women's Health is a research program within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Aims and Background

Aims:

  • To undertake and promote research into the promotion of screening for women

Researchers

  • Cannas Kwok, Western Sydney University

Research Projects

  • Understanding factors associated with breast cancer screening bahaviours among Vietnamese women in Australia.
  • Breast cancer screening behaviours among women from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds.
  • Barriers and facilitators to breast and cervical cancer screening for women with physical disabilities.
  • Routine health screening: Attitudes and practices of women in South West Sydney.

Find out more about the Women's Health Screening Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Contact

Cannas Kwok

Phone: +61 2 9685 9531

Email: c.kowk@westernsydney.edu.au

Our School of Nursing and Midwifery Research Collaborations are:

Centre for Applied Nursing (CANR)


The Centre for Applied Nursing Research (CANR) is a joint venture between the School of Nursing and MidwiferyWestern Sydney University and the South Western Sydney Local Health District (SWSLHD).

CANR's purpose is to undertake research, and to facilitate and support collaborations between nurses and nurse academics that will generate research relevant to the clinical, health promotion and health education role of nurses, and provides a basis for evidence based practice within this context, CANR conducts research in:

Find out more about the Centre for Applied Nursing Research (CANR).

Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research (CNMR)


The Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research (CNMR) collaborates with the health sector (NBMLHD; NSW Health; ATSI Health organisations), relevant industry, and the University’s Research Institutes (e.g. THRI), Centres and Groups; and seeks opportunities for Research Fellowships.

The Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research (CNMR) collaborates with the health sector (NBMLHD; NSW Health; ATSI Health organisations), relevant industry, and the University’s Research Institutes (e.g. THRI), Centres and Groups; and seeks opportunities for Research Fellowships.

The Centre aims to:

  • Build research capacity in the NBMLHD and at Western Sydney University through nursing and midwifery research in NBMLHD
  • Affect practice change in nursing and midwifery through translational research strategies
  • Diversify research income through collaborative partnerships
  • Improve ERA performance and quality
  • Develop engagement and impact strategies
  • Develop theme areas in research

In addition, the Centre aims to develop a strong narrative that promotes CNMR's capabilities and articulates their niche in the regional, national and international research landscape.

Find out more about the Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research (CNMR).

Centre for Oral Health Outcomes and Research Translation (COHORT)


COHORT is the first research centre of its kind in Australia and focuses on interdisciplinary oral health and capacity building and training non-oral health professionals and undergraduate students in providing oral health education, screening and referrals to their patients.

It is recommended that non-oral health professionals such as nurses, midwives and doctors play a more active role in promoting oral health among their patients. To facilitate this, South Western Sydney Local Health District Oral Health Service and the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Western Sydney University have formed the Centre for Oral Health Outcomes & Research Translation (COHORT); a new and innovative research centre affiliated with, and located within, the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research.

The COHORT research programs include oral health in pregnancy; paediatric oral health; oral health of Aboriginal people; oral health and cardiovascular health and stroke; oral health and cancer; oral health and diabetes; oral health, ageing and palliative care; oral health and disability.

Find out about the COHORT Research Projects within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

The New South Wales Centre for Evidence Health Care (NSWCEBHC)


Generating systematic review evidence and training to improve healthcare outcomes globally.

The New South Wales Centre for Evidence Based Health Care: A Joanna Briggs Institute Centre of Excellence, located at Western Sydney University  is a collaborating centre of the Joanne Briggs (opens in a new window). The NSWCEBHC was established in 2001 within the School of Nursing and Midwifery - Western Sydney University. The NSWCEBHC is a multidisciplinary centre that promotes and generates high quality systematic reviews to inform practice-decision making to improve health outcomes in specific populations, cultures and settings.

Our objectives are to:

  • Generate systematic review evidence
  • Provide systematic review mentoring
  • Promote systematic review evidence to community and industry partners
  • To mentor health student and professionals skills in systematic reviews

The NSWCEBHC provides leadership and collaborative opportunities in systematic review evidence generation and mentor ship for health students and professionals.

For more information about The New South Wales Centre for Evidence Based Health Care please contact Dr Jann Foster or Dr Christine Taylor.

Western Sydney Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre (WSNMRC)


To lead, empower and support nurses and midwives to conduct high-quality research to improve the health outcomes for individuals and the Greater Western Sydney region.

Established in 2017, the WSNMRC is a collaboration between Western Sydney Local Health District and Western Sydney University to lead, empower and support nurses and midwives to conduct high-quality research to improve the health outcomes for individuals and the Greater Western Sydney region.

The centre provides unique opportunities for clinical staff from Western Sydney Local Health District and Bachelor of Nursing or Midwifery (Honours), Masters and PhD students, as well as more established researchers to collaborate with our experienced academic clinical researchers to design, conduct, implement and disseminate research. This is achieved by developing a culture that promotes innovation and collaboration, both within the professions but also encouraging the development of transdisciplinary research with key stakeholders and industry.

Find out more about the Western Sydney Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre (WSNMRC).

QS top 100 subject rating

Western Sydney University has been ranked in the Top 100 Universities for Nursing, in this year's QS World University Rankings by Subject.

ARWU subject rating

SoNM ranked 5th in Australia and 22nd in the world in the 2017 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) by academic subjects.

CWUR subject rating

Western Sydney University has been ranked Australia's highest ranked Nursing School, in this year's CWUR Rankings by Subject.