Expert opinion

Experts share insights during FIFA Women’s World Cup

As the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 gets underway in Australia and New Zealand, Western Sydney University experts have shared key insights.


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Opinion: Penalties, passes, and a touch of politics: the Women’s World Cup is about to kick off

The 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup kicks off this Thursday night, the first football world cup hosted by Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand.


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Opinion: Health research must be ethical - we can do more to make sure that's the case for young trans people and their families

The Four Corners program on gender affirming care highlighted concerns about research undertaken with 79 young trans people and their families who sought help at the Children’s Hospital.


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Opinion: Period shame stops countless girls from continuing sport. The Women’s World Cup can help break this stigma

In the lead up to the first FIFA Women’s World Cup hosted in the Southern Hemisphere, host nations Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand are forging other firsts.


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Opinion: Why is it so hard for Local Aboriginal Land Councils to develop land when the public needs are huge?

Some of the largest landowners across New South Wales are Local Aboriginal Land Councils. It’s time the state government enabled these land councils to play a greater role in development.


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Opinion: Why eating disorder treatments only work half the time, according to a psychologist

No single treatment will work for all people with eating disorders. Even the most highly researched evidence-based treatment may work for some people, but less so for others. When such treatments do not work, it can provoke anxiety.


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Opinion: Turtles on the tarmac could delay flights at Western Sydney airport

Amid the controversy surrounding preliminary flight paths for Western Sydney’s new airport, another potential challenge is looming: turtles on the tarmac.


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Opinion: Henry Lawson and Judith Wright were deaf – but they’re rarely acknowledged as disabled writers. Why does that matter?

Most of us know Henry Lawson and Judith Wright are icons of Australian literature. But it’s less well known that they were both disabled.



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