MRM & MAC - 1 February 2022

Event Name MRM & MAC - 1 February 2022
Start Date 1st Feb 2022 11:00 am
End Date 1st Feb 2022 1:00 pm
Duration 2 hours
Description

11am - 1:00pm - MARCS Research Meeting and MARCS Afternoon Colloquium

PROGRAM

Zoom ID: 839 6390 0819
Password: marcs

NOTES:

  • We are hosting this meeting as a hybrid (zoom + in-person).You can attend MRMs in person either via Bankstown Campus or Werrington South Campus.
  • Join us for Thai Lunch after the MRM/MAC. Kindly register on the Eventbrite link sent across this week, for your respective campus.

Join us at the next MARCS Meeting as we host an eventful MRM and MAC program with talks from Professor Kate Stevens & Dr Jessica Taubert.

11am-12pm - MARCS Research Meeting

Topic: MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour & Development - Welcome back to 2022

Speaker: Professor Kate Stevens

Professor Kate Stevens welcomes back all staff and students. In this talk, we will reflect on 2021, and look forward to 2022.

Members from the MARCS Leadership Team will have the chance to introduce themselves to ensure all new students and staff in the MARCS Institute are able to understand some of the structures within MARCS, allowing them a smooth transition into a new year.

Members from the MARCS Leadership Team will also have a chance to highlight any successes and points of interest for the coming year.

12pm-1pm – MARCS Afternoon Colloquium


Topic: Neural mechanisms underlying the recognition of social signals

Speaker: Dr Jessica Taubert, The University of Queensland, UQ

The overarching goal of my research is to understand how we recognize different visual objects in the environment, with a specific focus on the recognition of social signals. Our remarkable ability to “read the room” is a form of social intelligence that emerges during infancy and contributes to our social wellbeing, yet its neural basis is only partially understood. How do we detect and locate other social agents while we are walking around? How do we seem to know when a stranger standing at a distance is looking directly at us? How do we track changes in someone’s mood during a conversation (and can we do this efficiently via zoom)? To address these questions and others, I combine psychophysics with state-of-the-art neuroscientific methods (including whole brain functional imaging, single-cell recordings and inactivation techniques) and I test multiple primate species, including rhesus macaques.

In this talk, I will describe some of my recent discoveries including (1) the causal role of the amygdala in face detection and (2) the neural correlates of emotional body language in the macaque brain. These experiments set the stage for future studies that will identify the neural circuits responsible for interpreting social signals and guiding social behaviour in both human and nonhuman primates. Summarised abstract/overview of presentation (Email) 100 words maximum In this talk I will describe some of my recent discoveries including (1) the causal role of the amygdala in face detection and (2) the neural correlates of emotional body language in the macaque brain. These experiments set the stage for future studies that will identify the neural circuits responsible for interpreting social signals and guiding social behaviour in both human and nonhuman primates.


MARCS staff and students are reminded that all meetings and workshops have an important role in building and maintaining the sense of community which is central to the success of MARCS as a cooperative and energetic research institute.  

Disclaimer: MRM meetings may be recorded on Zoom for future access to MARCS members
and subject to speaker's approval.

Link to zoom https://uws.zoom.us/j/83963900819?pwd=bDl5cVVkQWV2d1g4R2xaRFBtYTJiQT09