MARCS Monday Meeting - 27 July 2020 - Talks by Professor Rochelle Wynne as she discusses pressure injuries, followed by Professor Roger Dean with his talk on computing, composing, improvising and perceiving music

Event Name MARCS Monday Meeting - 27 July 2020 - Talks by Professor Rochelle Wynne as she discusses pressure injuries, followed by Professor Roger Dean with his talk on computing, composing, improvising and perceiving music
Start Date 27 Jul 2020 11:00 am
End Date 27 Jul 2020 12:00 pm
Duration 1 hour
Description

Please join us for talks by Dr Caleb Ferguson on wearable cardiac technologies for older adults, followed by Dr Quang Vinh Ngyuen on genomic data anlaytics with virtual reality.

Zoom ID: 986 9057 6845

Topic: Pressure Injury: do devices cause, cure or prevent?
Speaker: Professor Rochelle Wynne, Director, Western Sydney Nursing & Midwifery Research Centre

Abstract: The estimated healthcare cost of pressure injuries (PI) in Australia is in excess of $983 million a year. Deemed avoidable, PI are a common hospital acquired adverse injury most frequently occurring in critically ill patients. Risk factors associated with PI development in the ICU context include immobility, limited communication, sedation, haemodynamic compromise medical devices. Patients in intensive care units (ICU) are 2.4 times more likely to develop a PI as a consequence of medical devices. Devices increase heat, humidity and pressure on patients’ skin. In addition to treatment devices, a number of devices are being developed for use to support early detection of tissue damage with a view to preventing PI. The efficacy and feasibility of these devices remains to be seen.

Topic: Computing, composing, improvising and perceiving music in a continuous tuning system
Speaker: Professor Roger Dean, Research Professor of Sonic Communication


Abstract: Most music uses a single, fixed tuning system. Unlike an analogue grand piano, a physical synthesis instrument, such as one of Pianoteq’s series of grand pianos, is not necessarily constrained at any moment to such a single tuning system.  I'll discuss why a system using discrete piano pitches (not sliding pitches) chosen freely amongst the audible pitch continuum presents interesting musical and expressive possibilities. Audio and video extracts of compositions and an improvisation exploiting the system demonstrate its potential and a performing interface for it. I’ll mention some of the interesting perceptual  issues that arise from such a system.

The zoom ID is: 986 9057 6845. Link to zoom https://uws.zoom.us/j/98690576845