Past Projects

2018

Advancing the news media literacy of young Australians

This project responds to changes in the production, experience and consumption of news media by young Australians. In our recent research, we have identified several barriers that prevent news media literacy from being developed in the home and in schools in a meaningful and effective way. This project will document, analyse and address some of these barriers. In this way it will respond to emerging questions regarding the changing role of news in relation to active citizenship and democracy, and the challenge of ‘fake news’ or disinformation. It will achieve this by:

  • contributing to the design, implementation and evaluation of a new major semi-permanent exhibition at the Museum of Australian Democracy in Canberra, to be launched in 2019
  • developing a media literacy framework for the digital age to support the design of news engagement and learning materials
    engaging young Australians and school teachers as co-designers of the Museum’s news exhibition content and news literacy learning resources and activities.

Researchers: Dr Tanya Notley (ICS), Associate Professor Michael Dezuanni (Queensland University of Technology), Ms Edwina Jans (Museum of Australian Democracy), Mr Michael Evans (Museum of Australian Democracy)
Funding: Western Sydney University Research Partnerships Program: Museum of Australian Democracy; Google Australia
Period: 2018- 2020.
Our recent research: News and Australian Children, How Young People Access, Perceive and are Affected by the News (opens in a new window)
Project Website: Advancing the news media literacy of young Australians


An investigation of stories, narratives and alternatives to plastic in Cambodia

This postdoctoral fellowship investigates the potential of a group of traders and producers of processed food goods to act as drivers of plastic-free asset-based community development in Hanchey, Cambodia. The research examines local modes of valuation and the ways that productivity and efficiency are embodied. Grand narratives of modernity, including the embodiment of plastic in everyday life, will be set against and elicit small narratives, such as those embodied in attachments to traditional modes of production and packaging which have been significantly displaced. These may be contrasted to narratives embodied by “scalable solutions” to plastic, such as reusable aluminium water bottles and biodegradable polymer bags made with cassava starch.

Researchers: Dr Isaac Lyne (ICS), with advice by Professor Gay Hawkins (ICS) and Dr Denis Byrne (ICS)
Funding: The Seed Box, A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory
Period: 2018-2019


Assembling and Governing of Habits

This project aims to examine how modern Western disciplines conceived of habits, and how these conceptions informed the techniques of mundane governance which managed habits. As cities face increasing pressures, the challenges of governing everyday habits prompt urgent questions about how habits are understood and managed. This project will study the governance of 'city habits' from the late 19th century to the present. The project will apply and deepen its description of habit through case studies focused on contemporary Sydney. Its findings are expected to benefit city planners and policy makers by informing the organisation and regulation of habits.

Researchers: Professor Tony Bennett, Professor Gay Hawkins, Professor Gregory Noble, Professor Nikolas Rose
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019


Co-operative Housing Research

Housing affordability continues to be an issue in major cities and regional centres and there is a pressing need for affordable housing to be included in new housing development. The community housing sector has been charged as a primary growth provider and has demonstrated capacity in delivering affordable rental housing at a range of price points for very low, low, and moderate income households. However, providers are becoming aware that there are often no exit strategies for residents looking to transition to the open market – market-rate home ownership is frequently beyond the reach of households and consequently households may end up in insecure private rental housing, committing to an unmanageable mortgage, and/or back on the provider’s waitlist. Further, when exit strategies do not exist, pressure builds throughout the housing system, impacting service provision, housing prices, and waitlists. Therefore, there is need within overheated markets to provide a diverse range of affordable housing options, including permanently affordable ownership options. The project looks at the social value and economic viability of cooperative housing; the operational costs of cooperatives when carrying out their obligations of regular repairs and maintenance and the possibilities of diversification.

Researchers: Dr Louise Crabtree (WSU), Dr Emma Power (ICS), Dr Neil Perry (WSU), Dr Sidsel Grimstad (University of Newcastle)
Funding: Common Equity NSW
Period: 2018-2019


Cooling Common Spaces in Densifying Urban Environments

Current heat mapping has revealed hot spots in Western Sydney with ambient temperatures reaching 50 degrees in summer, while forecast modelling predicts 50-degree summer days potentially becoming a norm by mid-century. There is a pressing need to provide respite during heat waves both in and around the house and in the wider public domain, particularly in common spaces of rest, gathering and transit that span the public and private. This project will review current world best practice on cooling commons spaces. On the basis of this review it will propose design strategies to increase cool comfort and identify implications for urban design and governance. It will produce a pattern book containing visual, narrative and technical examples of cool space in collaboration with Landcom building design professionals and planners involved in the redevelopments in Airds, Claymore, Bonnyrigg, and Macarthur Park. A series of field visits will inventory potential sites where new ways of cooling common spaces might be trailed or introduced.

Researchers: Katherine Gibson(WSU), Emma Power (WSU), Cameron Tonkinwise (UNSW), Abby Mellick Lopes (WSU), Stephen Healy (WSU), Louise Crabtree (WSU).
Funding: Landcom
Period: March 2018 – March 2019


Marina de Valencia Living Lab: An Activation Project

In 2017 the Concorsio Valencia 2007 entered the second decade of transformation of the Marina de Valencia. The strategic plan 2017–2022 outlines a vision for the Marina as a place of experimentation and innovation, enabling both tradition and invention to drive the transformation of the economy, urban environment and civic culture of Valencia. In this project, the Intergener8 Living Lab is supporting the Marina de Valencia to create an experimental research and development ecosystem in which systematic practices of participatory design are applied to reimagine inclusive and innovative public spaces.

Researchers: Dr Philippa Collin (ICS), Associate Professor Amanda Third (ICS), Ramon Marrades Sempere (Marina de Valencia), Dr Michelle Catanzaro (School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University)
Funding: Marina de Valencia
Period: 2018


New public management, Aboriginal organisations, and Indigenous rights

This project aims to understand links between recent new public management reforms, particularly in New South Wales, and the operation and capacity of successful urban Aboriginal organisations. The project will include an analysis of case studies from other international jurisdictions (such as New Zealand and Canada). Urban Aboriginal organisations have a distinctive role in society about urban Aboriginal peoples and their rights to self-determination and community development. The outcomes from this project will provide evidence-based research to improve public policy understandings of the distinct role Urban Aboriginal organisations play in society, as well as insights from international comparative research.

Researchers: Dr Karen Soldatic (ICS), Dr Deirdre Howard-Wagner (Australian National University), Associate Professor Janet Hunt (Australian National University)
Funding: Australian Research Council, Discovery Project (via Australian National University)
Period: 2018–2020


Reviewing Cultural Diversity

The project aims to create a digital knowledge exchange portal to foster collaboration and networks, encouraging arts and culture leaders and academics in Australia and the UK to work together on solutions to shared challenges of cultural diversity within the Arts. Western Sydney University will deliver a written report at the end of the project.

Researchers: Professor James Arvanitakis
Funding: The British Council
Period: February 2018


Social Impact Analysis of NSW Arts, Screen and Culture

This project investigating the social impact of arts, screen and culture, was commissioned by Create NSW to provide insights into the role their arts and cultural initiatives play in delivering positive benefits to communities across the state. The project also aims to highlight the broad range of programs supported by Create NSW and their associated agencies, and to provide a framework for understanding social impact in terms of Social Inclusion, Health and Wellbeing, Community Resilience, and Cultural Identity.

Researchers: Professor Deborah Stevenson, Dr Sarah Barns, Ms Jacqueline Clements
Funding: NSW Department of Planning and Environment
Period: May – August 2018


Sustainable Cities Collaboratory

The Sustainable Cities Collaboratory comprises a group of Metropolis cities, together with a small number of global advisors and a selection of relevant research centres from around the world who pursuits common goals towards developments in urban sustainability, both at a city-level and globally, taking the lead in the agenda-setting for positive social change. The project has several purposes. Firstly, it aims to develop a set of principles, policies, and guidelines for sustainable urban development – building upon Metropolis’s ‘Principles for Better Cities’, in line with the Development Goals and the New Urban Agenda, sharing knowledge, experiences and ideas among the cities involved. Secondly, it aims to create a powerful voice for successful practical implementation of principles of sustainable urban development and - most importantly -  to develop and support the use of a set of coherent urban sustainability tools — finally, it pursuits to maintain a database of exemplary sustainability projects.

Researchers: Professor Paul James, Dr Liam Magee
Funding: The Federate State of Berlin, Senate Department for the Environment, Transport and Climate Protection
Period: May 2018 – December 2020


The China-Australia Heritage Corridor

Thumbnail image of heritage building in China.This project aims to show how buildings and places created by Chinese migrants in Australia and home places in China testify, beyond the narrative of arrival and settlement, to Australian connections with China and the Chinese diaspora. Using the 'heritage corridor' concept, it aims to develop a transnational approach to migration heritage and will provide tools and concepts for broadly documenting, analysing and interpreting Australia's migration heritage. The project aims to help a more cosmopolitan 21st century Australia capitalise on its legacy of regional linkages through Chinese migration.

Researchers: Dr Denis Byrne, Professor Ien AngDr Michael Williams, Dr Alexandra Wong
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019
Project webpage: The China-Australia Heritage Corridor


Volumetric Urbanism

Thumbnail image of city at night with streaming lights of a bus in movement.This project aims to explain how global built environment and development firms 'push the envelope' of urban space. In cities worldwide, governments are faced with the problem and possibilities of 'volume': stacking and moving people within booming central business districts, especially around mass public transport nodes. This project will examine the prototypes, calculative devices and mediating technologies that are used to redefine cities and maximise development values. It will analyse the justifications for high volume urban development projects, and assess how transnational business and design models shape city redevelopment. This project expects to provide insights into interpreting complex urban megaprojects in Australia and internationally.

Researchers: Professor Donald McNeill, Professor Simon Marvin
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019

Photograph: Robert Montgomery (opens in a new window)


You can't ask that: Mythbusting community-based palliative care

This study will promote awareness of community-based palliative care among consumers and their carers. It involves: identifying the questions, concerns, illusions, misrepresentations, and falsehoods that consumers and carers have about community-based palliative care; addressing these via an audio-video resource; and determining the perceived impact of this resource. Pending the findings, the audio-video resource will then be shared across and beyond the South Western Sydney Local Health District to promote awareness of community-based palliative care, and relatedly, death literacy.

Researchers: Associate Professor Ann Dadich
Funding: South Western Sydney Local Health District
Period: March 2018 – December 2019


2017

A Centre for Research Excellence in Adolescent Heatlh: Making Health Services Work for Adolescents in a Digital Age

Participation is one of eight standards listed by the World Health Organisation for quality healthcare service for adolescents. Despite these global guidelines and decades of evidence, youth participation in health research is not the standard approach. Moreover, while technology has become increasingly central to how young people search for information on, communicate with and access mental health services, other health services have yet to embrace the full potential of digital communications technology. Through active creation and promotion of innovative practices, Stream 1 of this CRE (led by Dr Philippa Collin and Professor Angus Dawson, University of Sydney) will develop a new ethics of engagement for adolescent health research in a digital age. In collaboration with the Intergener8 Living Lab, this research brings together diverse young people, families, health consumers, researchers, policy makers and other community members to investigate the conditions, ethics and modalities of youth-engaged health research. Our aim is to directly inform priorities and practices in health research and address the challenges of embedding young people’s experiences in health research, policy and service design in the digital society.

Researchers: Dr Philippa Collin (ICS), Dr Teresa Swist (ICS), Associate Professor Amanda Third (ICS), Professor Katharine Steinbeck (University of Sydney), Professor Rachel Skinner (University of Sydney), Professor Lena Sanci (University of Melbourne), Professor Deborah Schofield (University of Sydney), Professor Fiona Brooks (University of Technology Sydney), Professor Angus Dawson (University of Sydney), Professor Rebecca Ivers (University of Sydney), Professor Lin Perry (University of Technology Sydney), Associate Professor Bette Liu (University of New South Wales), Associate Professor Melissa Kang (University of Technology Sydney), Dr Julie Mooney-Somers (University of Sydney), Professor Leon Straker (University of Sydney), Dr Sally Gibson (Youth Health and Wellbeing, NSW Health), Professor Phillip Hazell (University of Sydney), Professor Louise Baur (University of Sydney), Professor Sandra Eades (Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute), Professor Susan Sawyer (University of Melbourne)
Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council (via University of Sydney)
Period: 2017-2022


Assembling and Governing of Habits

This project aims to examine how modern Western disciplines conceived of habits, and how these conceptions informed the techniques of mundane governance which managed habits. As cities face increasing pressures, the challenges of governing everyday habits prompt urgent questions about how habits are understood and managed. This project will study the governance of 'city habits' from the late 19th century to the present. The project will apply and deepen its description of habit through case studies focused on contemporary Sydney. Its findings are expected to benefit city planners and policy makers by informing the organisation and regulation of habits.

Researchers: Professor Tony Bennett, Professor Gay Hawkins, Professor Gregory Noble, Professor Nikolas Rose
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019


Between logistics and migration: Duisburg and the new Silk Road

China is building a new Silk Road. One of its arteries is the Yuxinou freight railway which runs between Chongqing and the German city of Duisburg. Opened in 2011, this railway has driven growth in Duisburg’s logistical sector. But Duisburg is not only a logistical city. It is also a magnet for migration with foreign-born inhabitants averaging approximately twice the rate for Germany as a whole. This project investigates relations between transport logistics and the logistics of migration in Duisburg. Its methods combine digital research with ethnographic fieldwork (interviews, observation, visual documentation) at workplaces surrounding Duisport (the city’s logistical hub) and in the adjacent migrant neighbourhood of Marxloh. The aim is to analyse how logistics produces and connects heterogeneous urban spaces and populations. This allows critical interrogation of traditional approaches to migration (push-pull factors, labour reserve, etc.). It also permits assessment of how logistics industries affect populations beyond their workforces. The project thus explores how the digital generation of data and software orientations in industry alter the material and symbolic coordinates of the city, generating a ‘long tail’ of informal labour and mediating social reproduction as well as practices of daily life.

Researchers: Professor Brett Neilson (ICS), Professor Ned Rossiter (ICS), Tsvetelina Hristova (ICS), Professor Manuela Bojadzijev (Leuphana University Luneburg), Dr Armin Beverungen (Leuphana University Luneburg), Moritz Altenried (Leuphana University Luneburg), Mira Wallis (Leuphana University Luneburg)
Funding: Western Sydney University, as part of an external scheme by Universities Australia and German Academic Exchange Service
Period: 2017–2018


Delivering urban wellbeing through transformative community enterprise

This project used qualitative methods to investigate the social, economic and material impacts of a community enterprise in Christchurch, focusing attention on Cultivate, a community enterprise that uses the common spaces of two urban farms transform green waste from restaurants into rich soil and high-quality fresh produce. The produce is then sold back to local restaurants, supported by the labour of at-risk youth interns. A main goal of the project was to be able to represent the impact that this organisation had on the wellbeing of young people, project staff, volunteers, and the broader community of Christchurch including other area enterprises and the municipal government. In-depth interviews with project participants were an entry point into a focused group process to explore both the inputs into Cultivate that serve as its conditions of possibility as well as a way of getting at the multidimensional returns on investment. The project provided an opportunity to further elaborate a previously developed assessment tool: Community Economy Return on Investment (CEROI). Project outputs will include a visual representation of CEROI assessment along with a video for popular audiences that will talk about the role of social enterprise in post-quake reconstruction.

Researchers: Dr Stephen Healy (ICS), Dr Kelly Dombroski (University of Canterbury), Dr Gradon Diprose (Massey University), Associate Professor David Conradson (University of Canterbury)
Funding: National Science Challenge 11: Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities NZ
Period: 2017–2018


Mapping the educational experiences of refugee students (MEERS)

Various community, government and non-government organisations have provided considerable assistance to schools with enrolments of refugee students. Recent studies, however, suggest that not only far more is needed, but that further research is required to gauge refugee students’ experiences of schooling and whether current practice is addressing their needs and those of teachers. This is the aim of the proposed project. Through a detailed qualitative enquiry, it will provide a comprehensive snapshot of the experiences of refugee students in NSW schools together with accumulating accounts of good practice in the area regarding curriculum, pedagogy and wider school programs. This research will be used to inform professional learning materials for NSW teachers building their capacity to support refugee students and their families.

Researchers: Associate Professor Megan Watkins (ICS), Professor Greg Noble (ICS), Dr Alex Wong (ICS)
Funding: New South Wales Teachers’ Federation
Period: 2017–2019


News and young Australians

Researchers: Dr Tanya Notley (ICS), Dr Flora Hua Zhong (ICS), Associate Professor Michael Dezuanni (Queensland University of Technology)
Funding: Crinkling News
Period: 2017

This project was motivated by public concern regarding the circulation and potential impact of fake news or ‘disinformation’. The project responded to these concerns by designing and implementing the first nationally representative survey to examine young Australians news practices and experiences. The survey analysis finds that young Australians aged 8-16 years consume a lot of news both directly and through their social relations (family, friends and teachers). While social media sites are often used for news consumption, young people are not confident about spotting fake news online and many rarely or never check the source of online news stories. Despite this, only one in five young Australians reported receiving any lessons to support their ability to critique news in the 12 months before the survey. The findings raise important questions about the need for news media literacy education – both in schools and in the home. The project report was launched at a major event, MediaMe, at The Museum of Contemporary Art. This event brought together 40 young Australians with news media organisations, social media platform companies and educators to develop proposals and recommendations that can advance young people’s news media literacy.


Photos of the Past: The Negotiation of Identity and Belonging at Australian Tourism Sites

Afternoon shot of the famous Uluru rock in Northern Territory, Australia.This project aims to provide a comparative analysis of the way Australia's past is constructed and remembered at heritage tourism sites. Over the course of three years, the project will examine how messages presented at six different heritage tourism sites are used to underpin present day constructions of national belonging. For this, the researcher, Associate Professor Emma Waterton, will focus upon understanding how such messages affect memory and notions of identity by focusing upon visitor responses to atmosphere, mood and meaning. Methodologically, the project will involve the ubiquitous touristic practice of photography, which will allow the research to move beyond notions of representation and consider how processes of 'taking photos' can be used to access sensory experiences, recover memories and imbue touristic sites with meaning.

Researcher: Associate Professor Emma Waterton
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period: 2012-2016
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 183KB)


Planning Cultural Creation and Production in Sydney

Thumbnail image of a photographer's studioBuilding on the findings of the Mapping Culture report, the second phase of the study, Planning Cultural Creation and Production in Sydney: A Venues and Infrastructure Needs Analysis, will examine the nature and extent of future needs for cultural space in the City, especially spaces for cultural creation and production. The research involves a combination of quantitative and qualitative method, and focuses on the people, activities and spaces with the potential for developing Sydney's cultural capacity. It is envisaged that the research report produced by this project will make a timely contribution to the development of the planning framework of metropolitan Sydney for the coming decades.

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Professor David Rowe, Professor Deborah Stevenson, Dr Liam Magee, Dr Alexandra Wong, Dr Teresa Swist, Mr Andrea Pollio
Funding: City of Sydney
Period: 2017 
Project webpage: Planning Cultural Creation and Production in Sydney

Photograph: City of Sydney


Smart, Skilled, Hired and Diverse: Co-Designing Youth Employment Programs to Work for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Young People

In partnership with Navitas English and migrant, recently arrived and refugee young people in Greater Western Sydney, this project will research and co-design the Smart, Skilled, Hired Youth Employment program so as to maximize the engagement of diverse young people and dramatically improve their employment outcomes. The project adopts an engaged research, co-design and strengths-based approach which builds on the knowledge and expertise that already exists within the young people, organisations and communities who benefit from this program. The project will roll-out over three distinct phases involving co-design, pilot, delivery and evaluation of the engagement model for the program.

Researchers: Dr Philippa Collin (ICS), Dr Teresa Swist (ICS), Dr Michelle Catanzaro (School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University)
Funding: Navitas English
Period: 2017-2020


The China-Australia Heritage Corridor

Thumbnail image of heritage building in China.This project aims to show how buildings and places created by Chinese migrants in Australia and home places in China testify, beyond the narrative of arrival and settlement, to Australian connections with China and the Chinese diaspora. Using the 'heritage corridor' concept, it aims to develop a transnational approach to migration heritage and will provide tools and concepts for broadly documenting, analysing and interpreting Australia's migration heritage. The project aims to help a more cosmopolitan 21st century Australia capitalise on its legacy of regional linkages through Chinese migration.

Researchers: Dr Denis Byrne, Professor Ien AngDr Michael Williams, Dr Alexandra Wong
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019
Project webpage: The China-Australia Heritage Corridor


Urban food economies - rethinking value for 'More-Than-Capitalist' futures

Researchers: Professor Katherine Gibson (ICS), Associate Professor Karin Bradley (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
Funding: Seed funding for the Environmental Humanities, A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory
Period: 2017–2018

At present, no model of urban development recognizes the value (both non-monetised and monetarised) circulating in and around urban food production sites that have been created by community action. Citizens thus have few means to push back against mainstream ‘growth as good’ visions of urban futures. The project aimed to organise a workshop in June 2017, bringing together a trans-disciplinary group of community and scholar-activists to:

  • rethink values associated with community-based food production
  • devise alternative indicators of value
  • model diverse value flows in ‘more than capitalist’ urban food economies
  • develop a larger collaborative research grant proposal to a major funding body.

Work is continuing to develop the Community Economies Return on Investment Tool as a way of capturing the value (broadly defined) created in a variety of urban food production sites. A research submission to the UK ESRC is under development.


Understanding the effects of transnational mobility on youth transitions

Young people increasingly migrate abroad for work and education, and Australia is a significant hub for sending and receiving. Migration and education policies encourage this mobility, which is expected to provide youth with enhanced competitive skills. This project aims to examine transnational mobility amongst young people and to understand its effects on their economic opportunities, social and familial ties, capacity for citizenship and transitions to adulthood. The project involves a five-year longitudinal study of 2000 young people aged 18-30 of Indian, Chinese, Italian and British ancestry, including both Australian citizens/permanent residents who have left Australia, and overseas citizens/permanent residents who have entered Australia. Outcomes of this project include a significant quantitative and qualitative dataset on how youth from various cultural backgrounds manage mobility and develop economic, social and civic benefits for themselves and the broader community.

Researchers: Dr Shanthi Robertson (ICS), Professor Anita Harris (Deakin University) and Associate Professor Loretta Baldassar (University of Western Australia)
Funding: Australian Research Council, Discovery Project (via Deakin University)
Period: 2017–2022


Volumetric Urbanism

Thumbnail image of city at night with streaming lights of a bus in movement.This project aims to explain how global built environment and development firms 'push the envelope' of urban space. In cities worldwide, governments are faced with the problem and possibilities of 'volume': stacking and moving people within booming central business districts, especially around mass public transport nodes. This project will examine the prototypes, calculative devices and mediating technologies that are used to redefine cities and maximise development values. It will analyse the justifications for high volume urban development projects, and assess how transnational business and design models shape city redevelopment. This project expects to provide insights into interpreting complex urban megaprojects in Australia and internationally.

Researchers: Professor Donald McNeill, Professor Simon Marvin
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2017-2019

Photograph: Robert Montgomery (opens in a new window)


Young and Online: International Children's Consultation for UNICEF'S 2017 State of the World's Children Report

Western Sydney University’s RErights.org team, in partnership with UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children team and UNICEF Country Offices and National Committees internationally, designed and delivered participatory research workshops with 500 children in 26 countries to gather children’s insights about their access and use of digital media. The results were included in UNICEF’s annual flagship report, the State of the World’s Children 2017: Children in a Digital World. The team also authored a companion report – Young and Online: Children’s perspectives on life in the digital age - and a data snapshot for each of the 26 countries.

RErights is an online platform developed by Western Sydney University, in partnership with the Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Digitally Connected, and UNICEF’s Voices of Youth, where young people can share their insights and experiences about their rights in the digital age.

Researchers: Associate Professor Amanda Third
Funding: UNICEF New York
Period: April – December 2017
Reports:

2016

Antarctic Cities and the Global Commons: Rethinking the Gateways

Thumbnail image looking down on buildings in Antarctica.This project aims to investigate how the Antarctic 'gateway cities' of Hobart, Australia; Christchurch, New Zealand; and Punta Arenas, Chile might reimagine and intensify their relations to the continent and each other. As pressures on Antarctica increase, these 'gateway cities' will become critical to its future.

This research is expected to create a robust custodial network of partner organisations that helps these cities care for Antarctica.

Researchers: Associate Professor Juan Salazar, Professor Paul James, Associate Professor Elizabeth Leane (University of Tasmania), Dr Liam Magee, Mr Tim Short (Hobart City Council), Dr Daniela Liggett (University of Canterbury), Mr Elías Barticevic (Chilean Antarctic Institute), Professor Dr Claudia Estrada Goic (University of Magallanes)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Partners: Hobart City Council; Department of State Growth; University of Canterbury, Christchurch; Christchurch City Council; Chilean Antarctic Institute; University of Magallanes.
Period: 2016-2019
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF,108KB)
» Antarctic Cities and the Global Commons video (opens in a new window)


Data Centres and the Governance of Labour and Territory

Thumbnail image of large cables in a data centre.Focusing on data centres in Singapore, Hong Kong and Sydney, this project aims to advance understandings of how these facilities are transforming ways of living and working in the Asia Pacific. Without data centres the world stops; these infrastructures are the core components of a rapidly expanding but rarely discussed digital storage and management industry that has become critical to global economy and society. The intended outcome of the project is a broadening of debates and research practices relevant to policymaking on the digital economy. The expected benefit is increased public knowledge about the social and cultural effects of data-driven economic change and, in particular, the growing importance of private data infrastructures...Read more.

Researchers: Professor Brett Neilson, Professor Ned Rossiter, Dr Tanya Notley, Professor Laikwan Pang (Chinese University of Hong Kong), Professor Stefano Harney (Singapore Management University), Associate Professor Sandro Mezzadra (University of Bologna and ICS Adjunct Fellow), Professor Anna Reading (King's College London and ICS Adjunct Professor), Junior Professor Florian Sprenger (Goethe University Frankfurt)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2016-2018
Project webpage: Data Centres and the Governance of Labour and Territory
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF,267KB)


Disability pension reform and regional Australia: The Indigenous experience

Disability Income Reform and Regional Australia: The lived experience for Indigenous Australians with disabilities is major three-year program of research funded by the Australian Research Council (DECRA Fellowship: ARC DE160100478). The project aimed to investigate the ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians living with disabilities and their families respond to, the challenges imposed by national disability income reform and rapid regional economic restructuring.

The project objectives are to:

  1. Build scholarly knowledge about Indigenous disabled people’s experiences of living ‘in between’ the interstice of national income support reform and regional economic growth, regeneration and/or decline
  2. Expand the theoretical boundaries of Indigenous identities through incorporating the category of disability as a regulatory regime, a redistributive mechanism and a social identity
  3. Enrich theoretical and applied understandings of the growing disability population of Indigenous Australians and their experience of disability in changing regional landscapes
  4. Elaborate Indigenous research methodologies to give ‘voice’ to Indigenous Australians with disabilities living in regional centres that can be scaled up to other contexts and settings
  5. Develop a rigorous theoretical framework to inform government (national, state, local) policies and programs that aim to promote regional economic development so that it is responsive to, and inclusive of, local Indigenous disability populations and their communities.

Researcher: Dr Karen Soldatic (ICS)
Funding: Australian Research Council, Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period: 2016–2018
Project Website: Disability Pension Reform and Regional Australia: The Indigenous Experience


Intergener8 Living Lab

Thumbnail image of a group of young people at a table with books.The next 25 years will bring rapid and significant technological, economic and social change across the globe. This change will be felt directly in Greater Western Sydney (GWS). In 2017, we worked with more than 100 participants in the Young and Resilient Living Lab Foundation Project to identify five key areas impacting the resilience of young people and their communities: places and platforms; education and learning; participation and engagement; health and wellbeing; sustainability and climate change. Following this, we have established the Intergener8 Living Lab to explore these complex issues and investigate how to leverage technology to promote the resilience of young people and their communities. Based in Greater Western Sydney and with collaborations around Australia and overseas, Intergener8 Living Lab is a co-research and design facility that embraces an integrated and intergenerational mode of R&D, training and enterprise focused on developing technology-based products, services and solutions that build the capacity of young people to live well and participate fully in social and economic life.

Researchers: Associate Professor Amanda Third (ICS), Dr Philippa Collin (ICS), Dr Liam Magee (ICS), Dr Peter Bansel (School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University), Dr Michelle Catanzaro (School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University), Dr Louise Crabtree (ICS), Dr Milissa Deitz (School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University), Dr Nida Denson (School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University), Ms Lilly Moody (ICS), Dr Katrina Sandbach (School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University), Dr Teresa Swist (ICS), Ms Samantha Yorke (Google Australia), Dr Girish Lala (Western Sydney University)
Funding: Western Sydney University Research Program Partnership: Google (Australia)
Period: 2016-ongoing


Reconfiguring the Enterprise: Shifting Manufacturing Culture in Australia

Thumbnail image of rooftops and skyThis project aims to explore the future for manufacturing in Australia in the context of sustainability. Concerned with the wider societal and planetary impacts of conducting business-as-usual, some innovative Australian manufacturers are reorienting their business towards social and environmental sustainability. The complexities involved in pursuing genuine sustainability call for shifts in the culture of manufacturing. This project plans to use qualitative research to explore the inner workings of 12 firms that are integrating different forms of sustainability into their core operations. It plans to develop business metrics and critical incident cases to unravel the negotiations involved in addressing social and environmental sustainability. In so doing, it expects to contribute to debates about the nature of enterprise in the 21st century....Read more.

Researchers: Professor Katherine Gibson, Dr Stephen Healy, Associate Professor Jenny Cameron (University of Newcastle)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2016-2018
Project webpage: Reconfiguring the Enterprise: Shifting Manufacturing Culture in Australia
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window) (517KB)

Photograph: Christian Grelard (opens in a new window)


Re-drawing the economy: Creating place-based images that can travel Phase 2

This project received funding to conduct workshops in Finland, South Korea and Colombia with communities who are building ethical economies. The workshops were designed to allow communities to take a measure of their own economic lives and to make common cause with others by sharing what they’ve learned. The project was informed by relationships between the authors of Take Back the Economy: An Ethical Guide for Transforming our Communities (TBTE) (J.K. Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron and Stephen Healy), artists interested in visual representations of economic relations, and the book’s Finnish, Korean and Spanish translators. In the second stage representatives from each community joined, translators, artists from stage one with other artists and community in Barking, London home of Company Drinks — a community and art based social enterprise, and CASCO art Institute from the Netherlands. The workshop developed materials for a digital exhibition and website as well as teaching tools that can be used in a range of settings to help promote a post-capitalist logic of economy, where mutual aid, care, cooperation and common concern are practised.

Researchers: Professor Katherine Gibson (ICS), Dr Stephen Healy (ICS), Associate Professor Jenny Cameron (University of Newcastle), Associate Professor Wendy Harcourt (Erasmus University)
Funding: Antipode Foundation Scholar-Activist Project Award
Period: 2016–2018


Study of women with disability in war affected communities in Sri Lanka

The Law and Society Trust, together with researchers from the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University, have collaborated in an unprecedented report documenting the stories of hardship and resilience of Sri Lankan women with disabilities living in war-affected areas. The Final Report was launched by the Sri Lankan Human Rights Commission in July 2018.

Researcher: Dr Karen Soldatic (ICS)
Funding: Law and Society Trust, Sri Lanka
Period: 2016–2017

2015

Ageing, Home and Housing Security Among Single, Asset-Poor Older Women

Researcher: Dr Emma Power
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period: 2015-2019
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF,145KB)

Thumbnail image of a brick house and a car parked in the driveway. This project aims to investigate the stability of single older women's senses of home, security and belonging as they negotiate asset and income insecurity. It examines: how national and housing provider scale housing policy and governance frameworks shape the ways that older women experience and make decisions about the home; and how the home is affected by housing mobility. Using a housing pathways approach, the project aims to develop knowledge of how housing markets and supply affect, and are shaped by, homemaking cultures and practices. The project aims to address a research gap about the ways in which asset-poor older Australians maintain stable housing pathways and senses of home, security and belonging as they age.


'Anti-Racism Apps': Models, Approaches and Uses of Mobile Media for Education Against Racism

Researchers: Associate Professor Alana Lentin and Dr Justine Humphry
Period: June 2015 – May 2016 (continuing)
Project webpage: 'Anti-Racism Apps': Models, Approaches and Uses of Mobile Media for Education Against Racism

A thumbnail image of a hand holding a mobile phone in the air with a crown of people pictured on the screen.This project will examine the way in which mobile media platforms and apps are entangled in specific understandings and approaches to racism. A number of 'anti-racism apps' in Australia, the US, France, the UK and Canada are the focus of the research. Using cultural research methodologies such as platform and interface analysis and interviews with developers and users we will critically analyse and assess the user models, approaches to racism and use of mobile media for education and governance to inform future developments in anti-racism interventions and services.


Cultivating Digital Capacities

Researchers: Associate Professor Amanda Third, Professor Paul James, Dr Philippa Collin, Dr Liam Magee, Dr Tanya Notley, Dr Justine Humphry , Dr Louise Crabtree, Samantha Yorke
Funding: Google Australia
Period: 2015-2016 
Project webpage: Cultivating Digital Capacities
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(274MB)

Family of four sitting around looking at an ipadThis project aims to measure digital capacity across four domains: economic, ecological, political, and cultural. It will identify enabling practices that help people connect using digital means, as well as barriers to participation in the digital world.  The development of the Index will draw upon qualitative case studies of Australian families from diverse backgrounds, along with a quantitative survey with 2,000 participants...Read more .


Staggered Pathways: Temporality, Mobility and Asian Temporary Migrants in Australia

Researcher: Dr Shanthi Robertson
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period: 2015-2018

Black and white thumbnail of people standing at an airport.Migrant mobilities between Australia and Asia are becoming more temporary and less linear. This project investigates the lived experience and the governance of 'temporally fluid' migration flows from Asia to Australia; explores migrants' senses of belonging over time at local, national and transnational scales; and develops methods and theories to analyse and visualise complex migrant journeys across borders, regions, visa statuses and labour markets. The use of time and temporality as framing concepts of the research will advance knowledge on how migration policy and migrants' decisions and experiences influence each other, and how belonging and transnationalism are being transformed by new types of mobility in the Asia-Pacific region.

Photograph: Vincent Albanese (opens in a new window)


Strengthening Economic Resilience in Monsoon Asia

Researchers: Professor Katherine Gibson, Dr Lisa Law, Dr Ann Hill (University of Canberra), Associate Professor Darlene Occeña Gutierrez
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2015-2018
Research Project Manager: Joanne McNeill
Project webpage: Strengthening Economic Resilience in Monsoon Asia

Flood zone thumbnailSharing, reciprocity and resource pooling are at the frontline of recovery and relief when economic crisis or disaster hits Monsoon Asia. This research aims to shed light on cases where these economic practices have been innovatively harnessed to diversify livelihoods and build economic resilience. Working with contemporary Asian scholars, practitioners in the disaster field and a data set gleaned from multiple sources, including mid-20th century tropical geography texts, the project aims to bring to the fore a regional landscape of diverse economic practices across Monsoon Asia. A cross-regional online knowledge community is expected to be formed to explore how this asset base might be mobilised towards more effective local development and disaster response.

2014

Australian Cultural Fields: National and Transnational Dynamics

Researchers: Professor Tony BennettProfessor David RoweProfessor Greg Noble, Professor Tim RowseProfessor Deborah StevensonAssociate Professor Michael VolkerlingDr Emma Waterton, Professor Fred Myers (New York University), Professor Modesto Gayo (Universidad Diego Portales, Chile), and Professors Graeme Turner and David Carter (both from the University of Queensland)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2014-2017
Project website: Australian Cultural Fields: National and Transnational Dynamics

Futuristic escalator with people Australian Cultural Fields examines the forces changing the production and consumption of contemporary Australian culture. It will assess the influence of transnationalism, the transformations caused by digital media, migration and multiculturalism, and the shifting presence of Indigenous culture, on the relations between culture and nation. Internationally, it is the first large scale study to interrogate the relations between the fields of cultural production and consumption.

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Making Animals Public: the Changing Role of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Building Public Value and Interest in Wildlife Documentary

Project transferred to ICS in 2015 with Professor Gay Hawkins' membership of the Institute.

Researchers: Professor Gay Hawkins, Mary Jane Stannus (Head of Content Services, ABC)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Partner: Australian Broadcasting Corporation (opens in a new window)
Period: 2014-2016

The aim of this project is to critically evaluate the ABC's changing role in building public value and engagement with animals through the genre of wildlife documentary. For many years wildlife documentary has been seen as quintessential public service content. There is no question that the ABC's Natural History Unit, set up in 1973, played a key role in making animals educational, entertaining and often national. Through an innovative collaboration between media scholars and the ABC this study investigates exactly how the ABC has built public awareness of animals' environmental and cultural significance and the national benefit of this; how this has been affected by changed production models; and how the ABC should manage the intellectual property (IP) of its extensive wildlife archive for the public good in a converged environment.

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Scientific Diversity, Scientific Uncertainty and Risk Mitigation Policy and Planning

A sign on the side of a road reads 'Planned burns reduce fire risk'.Researchers: Dr Jessica Weir, Liz Clarke, Dr Timothy Neale, Associate Professor Michael Eburn (ANU), Professor Stephen Dovers (ANU), Dr Josh Wodak (UNSW), Professor John Handmer (RMIT), Dr Christine Hansen (University of Gothenburg), Associate Professor Tara McGee (University of Alberta)
Funding:
Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre (opens in a new window)
Period:
2014-2017
Project webpage:
Scientific Diversity, Scientific Uncertainty and Risk Mitigation Policy and Planning

This project is focussing on how a better understanding of the role of science in decision-making will help industry articulate and defend decisions to the community, media, inquiries and elsewhere, and, better frame information and advice on how scientists and professionals communicate....Read more.

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The Changing Rights to Family Life in Australia: Biomedicine and Legal Governance in Globalisation

Note: Dr Sonja van Wichelen left ICS for The University of Sydney in January 2015.

Researcher: Dr Sonja van Wichelen
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), DECRA
Period: 2014-2017

Hand holding a transparent cap with cells in side This project investigates the impact of globalisation and biomedicine on the legal governance of family life in Australia by comparatively analysing transnational surrogacy arrangements and family reunification in immigration. It will improve public and legal understanding of the changing paradigms of family life in an era of globalisation.

2013

'A Nation of "Good Sports"'? Cultural Citizenship and Sport in Contemporary Australia

Researcher: Professor David Rowe
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2013-2015
Webpage: 'A Nation of "Good Sports"'? Cultural Citizenship and Sport in Contemporary Australia Thumbnail of cricket game at Sydney Cricket Ground showing players, the crowd and the scoreboard.

Sport is regarded, officially and popularly, as both characterising and uniting Australians. But sport's relationship to national culture is changing in response to shifts in both sporting participation and embodied/mediated spectatorship, and in the nation itself. This project reconsiders Australia's oft-remarked sporting 'obsession' in this dynamic context and its implications for cultural citizenship in the construction of (trans)national identities and affinities. It will advance conceptual and empirical understanding of the constituents of national sports culture and contribute to academic, policy and public debates surrounding Australia's sport and media systems, and the uses and meanings of sport among Australia's diverse citizenry.

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Logistics as Global Governance: Labour, Software and Infrastructure Along the New Silk Road

Researchers: Professor Brett Neilson and Professor Ned Rossiter from the Institute for Culture and Society with Professor Ursula Huws, Professor William Walters, Professor Ranabir Samaddar, Associate Professor Sandro Mezzadra, Dr Eleni Kambouri and Dr Hernan Cuevas
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2013-2015

data centre China is building a New Silk Road. It is set to revolutionise relations of trade and production, linking Asia to Europe and Latin America. This project investigates the cultural and social transformations introduced by this emerging economic network. Focusing on three key infrastructural hubs (the ports of Piraeus, Valparaíso and Kolkata), the project will advance understandings of how logistical processes manage labour forces and contribute to global governance. Digital methods will be used to: 1) build innovative platforms for broadening debates and research practices concerning software, labour and globalisation, and 2) provide a 'serious game' to illustrate changing scenarios of work and culture along the New Silk Road.

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Recalibrating Culture: Production, Consumption, Policy

Researchers: Professor Deborah Stevenson, Professor David Rowe
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Period: 2013-2016
Partners/collaborators: Auburn City Council, Fairfield City Council, Liverpool City Council, Parramatta City Council, Penrith City Council, The Council of the City of Sydney and Information and Cultural Exchange
Project webpage: Recalibrating Culture: Production, Consumption, Policy
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 191KB)

Thumbnail of collection of video stills arranged in a square pattern.This project documents and analyses changing modes of cultural production and consumption in Australia through a case study of the cultural economy of its most dynamic urban area, Greater Western Sydney. It advances theoretical-conceptual understanding and empirical knowledge of networks of contemporary cultural employment and activity, exposing and exploring interactions among key agents within diverse, growing cultural practitioner communities. In adding value to 'broad-brush' national cultural statistics, Recalibrating Culture will develop and validate a new cultural policy approach to Australian cultural development that, for the first time, effectively aligns with rapidly changing conditions and practices of the 'new' cultural economy.

Artwork: Khaled Sabsabi

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The Skin of Commerce: the Role of Plastic Packaging in the Construction of Food Security, Waste and Consumer Activism in Australia

Researchers: Professor Gay Hawkins, Dr Andrea Westermann (University of Zurich), Dr Catherine Phillips
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window) , Discovery Project
Period: 2013-2017

Thumbnail image of plastic water bottles.This project investigates the history and impacts of plastic on food production, markets and waste streams and evaluates innovative industry strategies to reduce the over reliance on plastic. If we live in an overpackaged world how might this mundane material and serious waste burden be challenged while still ensuring food supply? Three key issues will be investigated: the interactions between the plastics and food industries in Australia; consumer activism about plastic waste; and new market practices that reduce plastic packaging.

Photograph: Ricardo Bernardo (opens in a new window)

2012

Cool Living Heritage in Southeast Asia: Sustainable Alternatives to Air-conditioned Cities

Second-hand fans, refrigerators and other appliances standing outside with price stickers on them.Researchers: Dr Tim Winter, Professor Donald McNeill, Associate Professor Johannes Widodo, Dr Jiat-Hwee Chang
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Partner: Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2014
Project webpage: Cool Living Heritage in Southeast Asia: Sustainable Alternatives to Air-conditioned Cities

The challenges of reducing the carbon emissions of buildings are significant and complex. In response, this project focuses on electronic air-conditioning and considers the degree to which traditional, less energy intensive alternatives to thermal comfort can be maintained and reinstated....Read more.

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Governing Digital Cities

A photo of Sydney city taken from the air - shows Circular Quay and Botanical Gardens and is looking towards the CBD.Researcher: Professor Donald McNeill
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Future Fellowship Grant
Period: 2012-2016

This project will examine the relationship between private interests and urban governments that underpin Australia's transition to a digital economy. Drawing on international case studies, it will help to close the policy gap between digital infrastructure strategy and urban planning within Australian political debate.

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Photos of the Past: The Negotiation of Identity and Belonging at Australian Tourism Sites

Afternoon shot of the famous Uluru rock in Northern Territory, Australia.Researcher: Dr Emma Waterton
Funding: 
Australian Research Council(opens in a new window), Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period:2012-2015
Website: Photos of the Past: The negotiation of identity and belonging at Australian tourism sites
»Fact sheet(opens in a new window)(PDF, 84KB)

This project will explore the way visitors construct and express identity at a range of tourism sites in Australia. Focusing upon the practices of photography, the research will provide a detailed analysis of negotiations of belonging, which in turn may be used to facilitate debate over the pressing contemporary issue of national cohesion.

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Promoting Young People's Citizenship in a Complex World

A group of young people walking together.Researchers: Dr James Arvanitakis, Professor Bob Hodge
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2012-2014
Project webpage: Promoting Young People's Citizenship in a Complex World

This project aims to promote empowerment and agency to young Australians by developing the concept and practice of 'active citizenship'. This is done by confronting the emerging sense of disempowerment and alienation that many young people feel by developing ongoing work with a cross section of groups that are an important part of the civic landscape....Read more.

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Smart Engagement with Asia

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Dr Yasmin Tambiah, Dr Phillip Mar
Funding: Australian Academy of the Humanities (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2015

The depth of Australia's linguistic and inter-cultural competence will be a determining factor in the future success of developments in innovation, science and technology, research capacity, international mobility, trade relations and economic competitiveness. In the medium to longer term, the Asia Pacific region will be a principal focus, presenting major challenges and opportunities economically, socially and culturally, for our national security interests. The project, which is part of the Australian Council of Learned Academies' (opens in a new window)Securing Australia's Future program, examines how language, research and culture can be leveraged as vehicles for Australia's engagement with Asia. The final report, entitled Smart Engagement with Asia: Leveraging Language, Research and Culture (opens in a new window), was launched by Professor Ian Chubb, Australia's Chief Scientist, in Melbourne in June 2015. Members of the Expert Working Group are: Professor Ien Ang (Chair), Professor Chennupati Jagadish (Deputy Chair), Professor Kent Anderson, Professor John Fitzgerald, Professor Krishna Sen and Professor Mark Wainwright.

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Sydney's Chinatown in the Asian Century: From Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub

Sydney Chinatown Dixon Street Entrance. Photographer: John Marmaras. Source: City of Sydney.Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Professor Donald McNeill, Professor Kay Anderson, Steven Hillier
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Partner: City of Sydney Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2015
Project webpage: Sydney's Chinatown in the Asian Century: From Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub

The project examines the role of Sydney's Chinatown as a bridge in supporting economic and cultural links between Australia and Asia, and the activities undertaken by the City of Sydney to enhance those links in the era of rapid globalisation and rising Chinese power.

Photograph by John Marmaras. Source: City of Sydney.

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Violence and Disengagement from Violence in Young Men's Lives

A close-up photo of a young man's hand pulling a knife out of his pocket.Researchers: Professor Stephen Tomsen, Professor David Gadd
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2012-2014
Project webpage: Violence and Disengagement from Violence in Young Men's Lives

This project will study the significance of victimisation, perpetration and the watching of violence and images of violence, among young Australian men. It will explore the underlying links with masculine identity and have practical applications for developing an understanding of the unknown aspects of disengagement from involvements in violence....Read more.

2011

Decolonising the Human: Towards a Postcolonial Ecology

A side view of the human brain within the shape of a person - illustration.Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: Decolonising the Human: Towards a Postcolonial Ecology

Do you think you're human? This project interrogates how the notion of mind has come to shape western attitudes about what it means to be human. Focusing on the notorious head measuring practices of colonial times, it provokes a rethinking of our cherished claim of being privileged among other life forms.

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Everyday Geopolitics: Nationalist Subjectivities and ANZAC Thanatourism

Red poppies on an ANZAC memorial.Researcher: Dr Emma Waterton
Funding: UWS International Research Initiatives Scheme
Period: 2011-2012
Project webpage: Everyday Geopolitics: Nationalist Subjectivities and ANZAC Thanatourism

This project explores the affective experiences of memorial visitors using methodological innovations that can open up collective experiences of place and related intensities of affect. The research questions are both theoretical and methodological: First, how are affective spaces of thanatourism produced via specific practices, materials and relations? Second, how do we best capture this affective dimension?...Read more.

Homicide and the Night-Time Economy

A group of people at a bar - one is raising their drink for a toast.Researchers: Professor Stephen Tomsen , Jason Payne
Funding: Criminology Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: Homicide and the Night-Time Economy

This project is examining the prevalence, locations and trends in homicide linked to commercial night-time leisure, problematic drinking and drug use. Recent research has focused on levels of violence and crime and its links with public socialising at night. Assaults peak on weekend nights and follow the rhythms of night socialising, in the direct confines of the night-time economy or by indirect relation to it. These crimes include serious confrontational violence in and around licensed premises, and those with a 'spill' on to other after dark locations that include public transport, street and domestic settings....Read more.

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Intergenerational Attitudes to Cyber-Safety and Social Networking: A Living Lab

Researchers: Dr Amanda Third, Dr Philippa Collin, Natalie Bolzan, Ingrid Richardson, Lucas Walsh, Kitty Rahilly
Funding: Google Australia Pty Ltd (opens in a new window)
Period: 2011

Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance

Michel Leiris typing the first report on the Dakar-Djibouti Mission, 13 May 1932. � 2011. Mus�e du quai Branly/Scala, Florence.Researchers: Professor Tony Bennett , Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor Nélia Dias (opens in a new window), Dr Ben Dibley, Dr Ira Jacknis, Dr Rodney Harrison (opens in a new window), Dr Conal McCarthy (opens in a new window)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2014
Project webpage: Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 203KB)

This project studies early twentieth-century museums in Australia, Europe, North America, and New Zealand. Examining the relations between anthropological fieldwork, collections and social governance in colonial and metropolitan settings it highlights the roles of museums in culturally diverse societies....Read more.

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NSW Healthy Children Initiative: Social Marketing to Young People

Researchers: Dr Philippa Collin, Suzan Burton, Kathy Tannous, Ann Dadich
Funding: Health Administration Corporation
Period: 2011-2012 (phase 1)

Rethinking Multiculturalism/Reassessing Multicultural Education

A group of young children in school uniforms standing together.Researchers: Dr Megan Watkins , Associate Professor Greg Noble, Kevin Dunn, Nell Lynes, Amanda Bourke, Robyn Mamouney
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Period: 2011-2013
Website: Rethinking Multiculturalism/Reassessing Multicultural Education (opens in a new window)
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 94KB)

This project aims to shed light on the challenges posed by increasing cultural complexity in schools and their communities. It is examining approaches to multiculturalism in NSW government schools in urban and rural areas and how these link to the role of education in promoting social inclusion. The project explores the relation between perceptions of difference that shape teaching practice and the rationales of multicultural programs through an analysis of policy discourse, a statewide survey of teachers and focus groups with teachers, parents and students. These will then inform professional learning for teachers and action research projects in schools developing innovative approaches to meeting the needs of culturally diverse communities and improving teacher knowledge.

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World War One Refugees in Austria-Hungary and the International Community, 1914-1923

A map showing Austria and Hungary.Researcher: Dr Julie Thorpe
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: World War One Refugees in Austria-Hungary and the International Community, 1914-1923

This project will examine how WWI refugee movements have contributed to the displacement of national communities and European states. The research is divided into two main parts: examining the situation in Austria-Hungary during WWI; and exploring how the League of Nations High Commission for Refugees assisted refugees with their resettlement after the war....Read more.

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Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre

A young man stands against a brick wall with his hands in his pockets. His face is not visible.Researchers: Dr Amanda Third , Dr Philippa Collin, Professor Bob Hodge
Funding: Commonwealth Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Period: 2011-2016
Website: Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre (opens in a new window)

The Cooperative Research Centre for Young People, Technology and Wellbeing (YAW-CRC) will conduct research to understand the role of online and networked media for improving the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 12 to 25. YAW-CRC brings together young people with researchers, practitioners and innovators from 63 organisations, from across the not-for- profit, academic, government and corporate sectors to conduct research which helps us better understand how technologies can be used to ensure that all young Australians are safe, happy healthy and resilient.

2010

A Young People, Technology and Well-Being Research Facility

A young girl and man looking at their iPhones. (From Young and Well CRC). Researchers: Dr Amanda Third, Dr Philippa Collin, Jane Burns, Lucas Walsh, Rosalyn Black
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2010-2013
Website:
Inspire website (opens in a new window)

Large numbers of initiatives now mobilise technology to support the well-being of young Australians. However, amongst communities undertaking this work, there is currently significant duplication and insufficient sharing research and best practice models. A Research Facility that consolidates existing research, and guides new research and initiatives will improve service delivery to young Australians by: reducing duplication between organizations working with young people; providing an accessible interface with research that can help address, the community's concerns about the role of technology in young people's lives, and inform future policy and programs; and model effective cross-sector knowledge brokering to Australian industry.

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National Water Fellowship (2010): Cross-Connections: Linking Urban Water Managers with Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Researchers

Researchers: Dr Zoë Sofoulis (Fellow), Dr Justine Humphry (Research Associate), Vibha Bhattarai Upadhyay (Research Assistant)
Partners:
National Water Commission (opens in a new window)
Funding:
National Water Commission Fellowship Program; workshop grant from Australian Academy of Humanities
Period:
2010-2011

This project investigated the Australian urban water sector's engagement with humanities, arts and social sciences [HASS] research as part of developing socially sustainable water management. Activities included developing a database and the Tributaries directory of social and cultural researchers on urban water, interviewing water managers and researchers, conducting two knowledge exchange workshops, and producing a final report for the National Water Commission's Waterlines series. The research found mismatched expectations on how HASS research can or should contribute to water management strategies; it identified the need for HASS researchers to make their work more 'translatable' into action, and suggested initiatives to help overcome the enormous disparities between research funding and infrastructure for sciences and engineering compared to social and cultural research on water.

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Picturing Antarctica: Emerging Agendas for Antarctic Cultural Research

A person walking in the distance across the snow. The sun glows in the background. Image by Pedro Niada (April 2011).Researcher: Dr Juan Francisco Salazar
Funding: UWS Research Grant Scheme
Period: 2010-2011

This research project looks at Antarctica as a 'cultural site' and investigates cultural perceptions and the social construction of Antarctica in the national imaginary of Australia and Chile. One of its main aims is to advance contemporary cultural understandings of Antarctica through an analysis of public perceptions and opinions.

The project is designed as an interdisciplinary, multi-method and multi-sited research and involves a series of specific and practice-based research projects:

  • An international survey of cultural values and perceptions in Australia and Chile.
  • A digital ethnography of Villa Las Estrellas, a township in Chilean Antarctic Territory which also includes the development of digital storytelling workshops at the local school.
  • A transmedia documentary film project that inquires about the future of Antarctica.
  • A science-arts collaborative project on Antarctic culture/nature data ecologies and cultural mapping.

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Private Neighbourhoods

Researcher: Professor Deborah Stevenson
Funding: University of Western Sydney
Period: 2010-2011

Shanghai Expo

Looking down on a crowd of people at the Shanghai Expo.Lead Researcher: Dr Tim Winter
Research Team: Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Hart Cohen, Scott East, Hilary Hongjin He, Rob Leggo, Sally Leggo, Cameron McAuliffe, Professor Brett Neilson, Willem Paling, Professor David Rowe, Louise Ryan, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Dr Tim Winter
Period: 2010

In 2010 the city of Shanghai hosted the largest, most spectacular and most expensive World's Fair ever. The Shanghai Expo attracted a staggering 73 million visitors, ensuring China and the host city remained in the global spotlight for the six-month duration of the event. Costing around 45 billion dollars and with its theme of Better City, Better Life, the Expo was held in a country experiencing a level of urban growth unparalleled in history. With more than half of the world's population now living in cities, many of which face uncertain futures, this mega event confronted the multitude of challenges now converging on the all-pervasive notion of 'sustainability'. To this end, 190 countries, more than 50 non-governmental organisations, and a variety of multi-national institutions involved in urban governance addressed such issues.

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The Role of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Transformation Societies

A black and white photo of a canon and barbed wire in a field.Researcher: Dr Tim Winter
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2010-2013
Project webpage: The Role of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Transformation Societies

Since the Cold War, there have been a rising number of conflicts around the world. War and conflict almost always involve destruction and devastation on a human and social scale. With much attention focused on the political and economic aspects of reconstruction, the cultural damage can often be neglected. Moreover, given that it is not only politics that impact how a society rebuilds itself, this research brings into focus the often neglected cultural challenges and the role of cultural heritage in the rebuilding process....Read more.

2009

ASAN Plus Three Initiative on Healthy Tourism

An Asian girl with a white mask over her nose and mouth.Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell; Associate Professor Brent Powis, World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre – UWS
Funding: AusAID
Period: 2009-2010
Project webpage: ASEAN Plus Three Initiative on Healthy Tourism

This project investigated ways to promote the wellbeing of locals and protection of local economies and tourists from emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). The study was part of the project ASEAN Plus Three (Association of Southeast Asian Nations plus China, Japan and the Republic of Korea) Initiative on Healthy Tourism funded by the Australian Government's (AusAID) aid program....Read more.

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Culture in Transition: Creative Labour and Social Mobilities in the Asian Century

Looking over the city of Shangai.Researchers: Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Ned Rossiter, Meaghan Morris, Ranabir Samaddar, Hui Wang, Associate Professor Sandro Mezzadra
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2009-2012

» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 90KB)

The Asian century has arrived Australia's economic relations with China and India are crucial. Its cultural relations with these nations assume new importance. This project investigates how economic and cultural processes interact to change Australia's position in Asia. Focusing on the experiences of workers in the creative and cultural sectors of three cities (Beijing, Kolkata, Sydney), the project will advance understandings of changing forms of governance and migration in the region. New media will be used to 1) conduct experiments in cultural collaboration between Australia, India and China, and 2) build innovative platforms for the broadening of debates on social inclusion, intercultural dialogue and economic uncertainty.

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Development of Environmental Management Systems in Small Business in the Macarthur Region NSW

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Bruce Simmons
Funding: AusIndustry, an Australian Government funded initiative under the Building Entrepreneurship in Small Business program
Project webpage: Development of Environmental Management Systems in Small Business in the Macarthur Region NSW

Environmental management systems, though developed all over the world, have not been widely adopted by small businesses with usually 10% or less having taken them up. Though some inroads have been made recently in the Australian tourism industry, other areas of small business such as retail, manufacturing and services have yet to seriously implement them....Read more.

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The Just-in-Time Self: Young Men, Skill and Narratives of Aspiration in the New Economy

A close-up portrait of a young man.Researchers: Dr George Morgan, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2009-2011
Project webpage: The Just-in-Time Self: Young Men, Skill and Narratives of Aspiration in the New Economy

Historically, working class men developed their skills on-the-job in stable workplace communities. With the decline in trade and manufacturing employment, young people are told they must be flexible, individualistic and ready to retrain in response to technological change. Many young men, whose vocational inclinations are formed by Fordist models of masculinity, are unable to adapt to these post-Fordist pressures and suffer unemployment as a result. This project will look at the participation of three groups of men of different ethnic backgrounds in community cultural projects, at how skills are taught and learned in these settings and whether their experiences shape the emergence of new occupational identities and narratives of aspiration....Read more.

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Theorising the Entangled Relationships between World Heritage places, local people visitors and industry: a case study in Luang Prabang, Laos PDR

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Dr Russell Staiff
Funding: UWS (International Research Grants Initiatives Grants)
Period: 2009-2010

This project examined the socio-cultural and political dynamics of everyday life in Luang Prabang Laos, where the global and the local are in constant interplay and tension through the economic forces of  tourism and international institutional presences as a UNESCO World Heritage town. The research examined Luang Prabang as a complex, dynamic and complicated 'cultural system' to better understand the many entangled relationships: between economy, local stakeholders, cultural production and the ritual geographies of place, tangible and intangible heritage values. The research sought to use this to produce a more nuanced understanding of  the potential and the challenges created by tourism in a small  World Heritage destination. The research is ongoing with numerous publications, the development of an ARC Discovery application.

2008


Culturalisation and Globalisation: Advancing Cultural Research in Sweden and Australia

Blue shapes of countries connected by curved lines and above a layer of binary code.Researchers: Professor David Rowe, Johan Fornas, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor Kay Anderson
Partner/Funding: The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008-2012
Project webpage: Culturalisation and Globalisation: Advancing Cultural Research in Sweden and Australia

Researchers from the Institute for Culture and Society and the Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden at Linköping University, Sweden, are investigating the interfaces of culturalisation and globalisation. This research is funded by the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education under its Institutional Grants Program for the total amount of 1,600,000 SEK....Read more.

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Digital Storytelling: Urban Narratives of Migration and Sustainability of Community Media in Western Sydney

Researchers: Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Associate Professor Hart Cohen
Partners: Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE), Fairfield City Council (opens in a new window)
Funding:
University of Western Sydney Sustainability Research Initiatives Grant
Period: 2008

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Hot Science, Global Citizens: The Agency of the Museum Sector in Climate Change Debates

Researchers: Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor Bob Hodge, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Jan Conroy, David Karoly, S. Chan, Carolyn Meehan, Lynda Kelly, Graham Durant, Wayne LaBar, Richard Sandell
Partners: Powerhouse Museum (opens in a new window), Museum Victoria (opens in a new window), Australian Museum, Questacon (opens in a new window), Liberty Science Center (opens in a new window)(USA)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Period: 2008-2010
Website: Hot Science - Global Citizens (opens in a new window)

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Reassessing Multicultural Education

Researchers: Dr Megan Watkins, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Partner: NSW Department of Education (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008-2010
Project webpage: Reassessing Multicultural Education

This project explores approaches to multicultural education in NSW government schools. It has become clear that multicultural education is in something of a crisis in Australia, and across the world. Some of the assumptions made about cultural diversity that formed the basis of multicultural education programs in the 1970s may no longer be appropriate. Diversity has become more diverse, shaped by intergenerational change, intermarriage and the different ways ethnic groups have accepted or rejected other cultural practices and beliefs. Students may claim three or four different cultural and linguistic heritages, and this makes it difficult to know what these students need, and how to provide it....Read more.

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Struggling for Possession: The Control and Use of Online Media Sport

A brown rugby ball sitting on top of a white keyboard.Researchers: Professor David Rowe, Brett Hutchins
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2008-2011
Project webpage: Struggling for Possession: The Control and Use of Online Media Sport

This project is exploring media ownership and sports coverage using digital outlets. Sport is immensely popular in many media forms, and has been dominated by broadcast television for over three decades. But when sport coverage is presented online, who owns it and who has a right to access it? Recent disputes over ownership of online sport content demonstrate its pivotal role in both media and sport development. Many questions regarding private ownership by media companies, and citizens' rights to access sport in new media environments, are still to be effectively answered....Read more.

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"Sweet Tonic" - Qualitative Research Proposal

Researcher: Elaine Lally
Partners: Campbelltown Arts Centre, Musica Viva Australia (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008
Project webpage: "Sweet Tonic" - Qualitative Research Proposal

This project explores the health and well-being benefits for participation in musical activities for older Australians. As Australia ages and demand for health and aging services grows, it is vital that the cultural sector engages with older citizens and their concerns. The "Sweet Tonic: Music for Life" program of singing workshops, delivered by Musica Viva Australia in participation with Campbelltown Arts Centre and the Australia Council for the Arts, is one such program. It aims to show that participation in singing and music training has demonstrable health and well-being benefits. This research project will study the "Sweet Tonic" workshops and attempt to identify the positive physical, mental, social and cultural outcomes of the "Sweet Tonic" music-based community cultural development initiative....Read more.

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The City After Dark: The Governance and Lived Experience of Urban Night-Time Culture

A shadow of a man in a dark street.Researchers: Professor David Rowe, Professor Deborah Stevenson, Professor Stephen Tomsen
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2008-2011
Project webpage: The City after Dark: The Governance and Lived Experience of Urban Night-Time Culture

The stimulation of a night-time economy can deliver great cultural, social and economic benefits to Australian cities, or result in social disruption and disputation, assaults, and serious injuries that drain criminal justice and health resources. The promotion and regulation of the city at night is amongst the most important issues facing communities, private enterprise and governments around the globe....Read more.

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Young Aboriginal Men, Informal Learning and the 'New Economy' in Redfern, Waterloo

Researcher: Dr George Morgan
Partner/ Funding: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (opens in a new window)(AIATSIS)
Period: 2008-2009
Project webpage: Young Aboriginal Men, Informal Learning and the 'New Economy' in Redfern, Waterloo

This project is looking at whether informal training programs for young indigenous men can lead to the development of skills suitable for employment. Many young indigenous men in the Redfern Waterloo area in Sydney lack formal job qualifications and have grown up in households characterised by long-term unemployment. They have not developed the vocational ambitions and work habits required to build careers and they have little enthusiasm for post-school formal education, having often been alienated from the competitive world of work and education in the past....Read more.

2007

Dissemination of Environmental Management Training for Tourism Businesses

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Bruce Simmons
Partner: NSW Environmental Trust (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

Global Digital Atlas for Cultural Diversity, Pluralism and Intercultural Dialogue in Asia

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Professor Kay Anderson, Andre Frankovits, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Ian Johnson, Steven Hayes, Andrew Wilson, Beng Huat Chua, Daniel P. S. Goh, Eric Charles Thompson, Anjali Monteiro, K. P. Jayasankar, Shilpa Phadke
Partner: UNESCO
Period: 2007-2008
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 91KB)

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Law and the City: The Parramatta Justice Precinct as Civic Culture

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Partners: Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window), NSW Attorney General's Department (opens in a new window)
Funding:
University of Western Sydney Urban Research Initiatives Grant
Period: 2007

'Parramatta Stories': Values Based Community Development

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Dr Russell Staiff, Polladach Theerapapisit
Funding: University of Western Sydney Research Grant
Partner: Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

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Putting Humanities to Work in a Chaotic World: Dynamic Interdisciplinarity and Community Engagement

Researcher: Professor Bob Hodge
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2007-2009

The City After Dark: Cultural Planning and Governance of the 'Night-time Economy' in Parramatta

Researchers: Professor David RoweProfessor Deborah StevensonProfessor Stephen Tomsen
Partner: Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window)
Funding: 
University of Western Sydney Urban Research Initiatives Grant
Period:
2007

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Universal Design and Cultural Context: Accessibility, Diversity and Recreational Space in Penrith

Researchers: Dr Zoe Sofoulis, Professor Helen Armstrong, Michael Bounds, Abby Lopes, Tara Andrews
Funding: 
University of Western Sydney Research Partnerships Program
Partner: 
Penrith City Council(opens in a new window)
Period:
2007

Urban Cultural Economics: Landscapes and Life in Sydney and New York

Researchers: Dr George MorganProfessor Kay Anderson
Funding: University of Western Sydney International Research Initiatives Grant
Partner: 
City University of New York, USA(opens in a new window)
Period:2007

2006

Advancing Cultural Research in Australian and European Contexts: Citizenship, Migration and Globalisation

Researchers: Associate Professor Brett NeilsonProfessor Kay Anderson, Fiona AllonFunding: University of Western Sydney Eminent Research Visitors SchemePartner: Associate Professor Sandro MezzadraUniversity of Bologna, ItalyPeriod: 2006-2008

AHURI Scholarship - Anne Hurni - Urban development, transport and child health: the case of Western Sydney

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
Period: 2006-2010

A Study of the Brazilian Community in Australia and Australian-Brazilian Bilateral Exchange

Researcher: Dr Christina Rocha (Australian Postdoctoral Fellow)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2006-2008
» Fact sheet (PDF, 38KB)

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Doing the Knowledge: Youth in Transition in Marrickville

Researchers: Dr George Morgan, Bronwyn Davies and Philip TonerFunding: University of Western Sydney Partnership GrantPartner: Western Sydney Region Councils through WSROC (opens in a new window)Period: 2006

Open Cities: Urban Citizenship in Sydney and Berlin

Researchers: Fiona Allon, Professor Kay Anderson, Professor Ien Ang, Justine Lloyd, Russell West-Pavlov, Mark Stein
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Partner: Free University of Berlin (opens in a new window), Germany
Period: 2006-2007

The Art of Engagement: Exploring a Contemporary Arts - Business Collaboration

Researchers: Elaine Lally, Professor Ien Ang, Professor Kay Anderson, Elizabeth Macgregor
Partners and Funding: Museum of Contemporary Art (opens in a new window), Penrith Regional Gallery (opens in a new window), Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2006-2008

2005

Anti-Ageing Devices: On the Cultural Politics of Staying Young in a Globalised World

Researchers: Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor C Franceschi, Dr G Lamura
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007
» Fact Sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 241KB)

Bridging Worlds, Linking Cultures: an Electronic Planning Tool for the Western Sydney Region

Researchers: Elaine Lally, Professor Bob Hodge, Ms T Lee-Shoy
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Western Sydney Organisation of Councils (WSROC) (opens in a new window), Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE)
Period: 2005-2006
» Fact Sheet (PDF, 42KB)

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Cross-Cultural 'Larrikins' in a Neo-liberal World: Ideology and Myth in Postmodern Australia, Mexico and Brazil

Researchers: Professor Bob Hodge, Dr Gabriela Coronado, Dr Fernanda Duarte, Dr Gregory Teal
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

Culture Circuits: Exploring the International Networks and Institutions Shaping Contemporary Cultural Policy

Researchers: Professor Deborah Stevenson, Professor David RoweFunding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

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Cultural Research for the 21st Century: Building Cultural Intelligence for a Complex World

Researcher: Professor Ien Ang (Australian Professorial Fellow)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2010

Cultural complexity is one of the key characteristics of 21st century Australia. This is manifest in the rapid proliferation of social and cultural differences in society. By developing knowledge about the challenges posed by cultural complexity to the management of diversity, this project will assist public institutions and the broader community in building the cultural intelligence needed to address these challenges in more effective and innovative ways. In this way the project will showcase the practical benefits of cultural research – and the humanities and social sciences more generally – in the promotion of an innovation culture and economy.

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Discipline and Diversity: Cultural Practices and Dispositions of Learning

Researchers: Associate Professor Greg Noble, Dr Megan WatkinsFunding: NSW Department of Education and Training (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007
» Fact Sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 33KB)

Handling the 'Battering Ram': Rupert Murdoch, News Corporation and the Global Contest for Dominance in Sports Television

Researcher: Professor David RoweFunding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

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Homebuyer Preferences and Developer Contributions

Researcher: Professor Kay AndersonFunding: Urban Development Institute of Australia, University of Western Sydney
Period: 2005-2007

Informal Pathways to Wellbeing: Cultural Forms of Belonging, Inclusion and Engagement for Young People in Western Sydney

Researcher: Associate Professor Greg NobleFunding: NSW Department of Community Services, Uniting Care Burnside, Australian Council for the Arts, Community Cultural Development NSW, Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (opens in a new window), Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (opens in a new window), University of Western Sydney Children's Futures Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Scheme
Period: 2005-2007

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Multiculturalism Research Project (Living Diversity 2)

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Funding: Special Broadcasting Service Corporation
Period: 2005-2006

Reconceptualising Heritage Collections: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Museum Collections and Documentation

Researchers: Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor E A Edmonds, Professor S R Garton, Mr KS Sumption
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Powerhouse Museum (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

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The Cultural Research Network

Researchers: Associate Professor Greg Noble, Graeme Turner, Dr Zoë Sofoulis, Professor Kay Anderson, Professor Ien Ang
Funding: Australian Research Council Research Networks
Period: 2005-2010

The Humanities Beyond Humanism: Race, Nature and the Human in Australia from Enlightenment to Federation

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

2004

Backpacker Cultures, Residential Communities, and the Construction of Tourist Spaces and Landscapes: A Regional Study of Changing Tourism Dynamics in Sydney

Researchers: Professor Kay Anderson, Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Fiona Allon, Mr N Ryan
Partners/Funding: City of Sydney (opens in a new window), Manly Council (opens in a new window), Randwick City Council (opens in a new window), Waverley Council (opens in a new window), North Sydney Council (opens in a new window), Woollahra Council (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2004-2007

Negotiating the Challenge of Cultural Diversity in Children's Health Care: The Australian Context

Researchers: Dr Sharon Chalmers, Professor Ien Ang, Professor J Mason, Mr S K Choucair, Professor L J White, Dr B A Lord, Dr J G Eastwood
Partners/Funding: Multicultural Health Unit, South East Sydney, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (opens in a new window), Children's Hospital at Westmead (opens in a new window), Division of Population Health, South West (opens in a new window), NSW Department of Health (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2004-2007

The Special Broadcasting Service and Australian Cultural Democracy Evolution, Uses and Innovation

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Gay Hawkins, Julie Eisenberg
Funding: Special Broadcasting Service Corporation
Period: 2004-2008

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