Past Projects

'A Nation of "Good Sports"'? Cultural Citizenship and Sport in Contemporary Australia

Researcher: Professor David Rowe
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2013-2016
Project webpage: 'A Nation of "Good Sports"'? Cultural Citizenship and Sport in Contemporary Australia 
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 206KB)

Thumbnail of cricket game at Sydney Cricket Ground showing players, the crowd and the scoreboard.Sport is regarded, officially and popularly, as both characterising and uniting Australians. But sport's relationship to national culture is changing in response to shifts in both sporting participation and embodied/mediated spectatorship, and in the nation itself. This project reconsiders Australia's oft-remarked sporting 'obsession' in this dynamic context and its implications for cultural citizenship in the construction of (trans)national identities and affinities. It will advance conceptual and empirical understanding of the constituents of national sports culture and contribute to academic, policy and public debates surrounding Australia's sport and media systems, and the uses and meanings of sport among Australia's diverse citizenry.

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A Study of the Brazilian Community in Australia and Australian-Brazilian Bilateral Exchange

Researchers: Dr Christina Rocha (Australian Postdoctoral Fellow)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2006-2008
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 38KB)

A Young People, Technology and Well-Being Research Facility

Researchers: Associate Professor Amanda Third, Dr Philippa Collin, Jane Burns, Lucas Walsh, Rosalyn Black
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2010-2013 (continuing)
Project webpages:
 Young People, Technology and Wellbeing

A young girl and man looking at their iPhones. (From Young and Well CRC). Large numbers of initiatives now mobilise technology to support the well-being of young Australians. However, amongst communities undertaking this work, there is currently significant duplication and insufficient sharing research and best practice models. A Research Facility that consolidates existing research, and guides new research and initiatives will improve service delivery to young Australians by: reducing duplication between organisations working with young people; providing an accessible interface with research that can help address, the community's concerns about the role of technology in young people's lives, and inform future policy and programs; and model effective cross-sector knowledge brokering to Australian industry.

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Advancing Cultural Research in Australian and European Contexts: Citizenship, Migration and Globalisation

Researcher(s): Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor Kay Anderson, Fiona Allon
Partners: Associate Professor Sandro Mezzadra, University of Bologna, Italy
Funding: University of Western Sydney Eminent Research Visitors Scheme
Period: 2006-2008

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AHURI Scholarship - Anne Hurni - Urban development, transport and child health: the case of Western Sydney 

Researcher(s): Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
Period: 2006-2010

Anti-Ageing Devices: On the Cultural Politics of Staying Young in a Globalised World

Researchers: Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor C Franceschi, Dr G Lamura
Funding: Australian Research Council
Period: 2005-2007
» Fact Sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 241KB)

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ASEAN Plus Three Initiative on Healthy Tourism

An Asian girl with a white mask over her nose and mouth.Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell ; Associate Professor Brent Powis, World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre – UWS
Funding: AusAID
Period: 2009-2010
Project webpage: ASEAN Plus Three Initiative on Healthy Tourism

This project investigated ways to promote the wellbeing of locals and protection of local economies and tourists from emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). The study was part of the project ASEAN Plus Three (Association of Southeast Asian Nations plus China, Japan and the Republic of Korea) Initiative on Healthy Tourism funded by the Australian Government's (AusAID) aid program....Read more.

Backpacker Cultures, Residential Communities, and the Construction of Tourist Spaces and Landscapes: A Regional Study of Changing Tourism Dynamics in Sydney

Researcher(s): Professor Kay Anderson, Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Fiona Allon, Mr N Ryan
Partners/Funding: City of Sydney (opens in a new window), Manly Council (opens in a new window), Randwick City Council (opens in a new window), Waverley Council (opens in a new window), North Sydney Council (opens in a new window), Woollahra Council (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2004-2007

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Bridging Worlds, Linking Cultures: an Electronic Planning Tool for the Western Sydney Region

Researchers: Elaine Lally, Professor Bob Hodge, Ms T Lee-Shoy
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Western Sydney Organisation of Councils (WSROC) (opens in a new window), Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE)
Period: 2005-2006
» Fact Sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 42KB)

Cool Living Heritage in Southeast Asia: Sustainable Alternatives to Air-conditioned Cities

Researchers: Professor Donald McNeill, Dr Tim Winter, Associate Professor Johannes Widodo, Dr Jiat-Hwee Chang
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Partner: Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2014
Project webpage: Cool Living Heritage in Southeast Asia: Sustainable Alternatives to Air-conditioned Cities
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 181KB)

Second-hand fans, refrigerators and other appliances standing outside with price stickers on them.This project focuses on alternatives to electronic air-conditioning to encourage more sustainable urban lifestyles in Southeast Asia. It traces the historical emergence of climate-controlled interiors as spaces through which visions and expectations about national standards of living, comfort, productivity and leisure have coalesced. A wide array of tradition-based, low-carbon thermal comfort alternatives to air-conditioning are examined....Read more.

Cross-Cultural 'Larrikins' in a Neo-liberal World: Ideology and Myth in Postmodern Australia, Mexico and Brazil

Researchers: Professor Bob Hodge, Dr Gabriela Coronado, Dr Fernanda Duarte, Dr Gregory Teal
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

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Cultural Research for the 21st Century: Building Cultural Intelligence for a Complex World

Researcher: Professor Ien Ang
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2005-2010

Cultural complexity is one of the key characteristics of 21st century Australia. This is manifest in the rapid proliferation of social and cultural differences in society. By developing knowledge about the challenges posed by cultural complexity to the management of diversity, this project will assist public institutions and the broader community in building the cultural intelligence needed to address these challenges in more effective and innovative ways. In this way the project will showcase the practical benefits of cultural research – and the humanities and social sciences more generally – in the promotion of an innovation culture and economy.

Culturalisation and Globalisation: Advancing Cultural Research in Sweden and Australia

Blue shapes of countries connected by curved lines and above a layer of binary code.Researchers: Professor David Rowe , Johan Fornas, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Professor Kay Anderson
Partner/Funding:
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008-2012
Project webpage: Culturalisation and Globalisation: Advancing Cultural Research in Sweden and Australia

Researchers from the Institute for Culture and Society and the Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden at Linköping University, Sweden, are investigating the interfaces of culturalisation and globalisation. This research is funded by the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education under its Institutional Grants Program for the total amount of 1,600,000 SEK....Read more.

Culture Circuits: Exploring the International Networks and Institutions Shaping Contemporary Cultural Policy

Researchers: Professor Deborah Stevenson, Professor David Rowe
Funding: Australian Research Council
Period: 2005-2007

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Culture in Transition: Creative Labour and Social Mobilities in the Asian Century

Looking over the city of Shangai.Researchers: Associate Professor Brett Neilson , Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Ned Rossiter, Meaghan Morris, Ranabir Samaddar, Hui Wang, Associate Professor Sandro Mezzadra
Funding: Australian Research Council(opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2009-2012
Website: Project website (opens in a new window)
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 90KB)

The Asian century has arrived Australia's economic relations with China and India are crucial. Its cultural relations with these nations assume new importance. This project investigates how economic and cultural processes interact to change Australia's position in Asia. Focusing on the experiences of workers in the creative and cultural sectors of three cities (Beijing, Kolkata, Sydney), the project will advance understandings of changing forms of governance and migration in the region. New media will be used to 1) conduct experiments in cultural collaboration between Australia, India and China, and 2) build innovative platforms for the broadening of debates on social inclusion, intercultural dialogue and economic uncertainty.

Decolonising the Human: Towards a Postcolonial Ecology

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: Decolonising the Human: Towards a Postcolonial Ecology

A side view of the human brain within the shape of a person - illustration.Do you think you're human? This project interrogates how the notion of mind has come to shape western attitudes about what it means to be human. Focusing on the notorious head measuring practices of colonial times, it provokes a rethinking of our cherished claim of being privileged among other life forms. 'The threat of ecological catastrophe has put into question the idea that people enjoy a privileged relationship to their environment,' says Professor Anderson....Read more.

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Development of Environmental Management Systems in Small Business in the Macarthur Region NSW

Researcher(s): Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Bruce Simmons, Luciano Mesiti
Funding: AusIndustry, an Australian Government funded initiative under the Building Entrepreneurship in Small Business program
Project webpage: Development of Environmental Management Systems in Small Business in the Macarthur Region NSW

Environmental management systems, though developed all over the world, have not been widely adopted by small businesses with usually 10% or less having taken them up. Though some inroads have been made recently in the Australian tourism industry, other areas of small business such as retail, manufacturing and services have yet to seriously implement them....Read more.

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Digital Storytelling: Urban Narratives of Migration and Sustainability of Community Media in Western Sydney

Researcher(s): Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Associate Professor Hart Cohen
Partners: Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and Fairfield City Council
Funding: University of Western Sydney Sustainability Research Initiatives Grant
Period: 2008

Discipline and Diversity: Cultural Practices and Dispositions of Learning

Researchers: Associate Professor Greg Noble, Dr Megan Watkins
Funding: NSW Department of Education and Training (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007
» Fact Sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 33KB)

Dissemination of Environmental Management Training for Tourism Businesses

Researcher(s): Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Bruce Simmons
Partner: NSW Environmental Trust (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

Doing the Knowledge: Youth in Transition in Marrickville

Researcher(s): Dr George Morgan, Bronwyn Davies, Philip Toner
Funding: University of Western Sydney Partnership Grant
Partner: Western Sydney Region Councils through WSROC (opens in a new window)
Period: 2006

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Driving Cultures

A series of related projects from 1999-2004.

Projects

1999; Road Safety and Young Drivers ('Driving Cultures'); Researcher Sarah Redshaw, with Chief Investigator Dr Zoë Sofoulis; Funding: NSW Attorney General's Crime Prevention Division, Innovative Grants Scheme.

2002; Driving Messages; Researchers: Dr Zoë Sofoulis, Dr Greg Noble, Sarah Redshaw; Funding: internal UWS grant to develop and pilot focus groups and questionnaires on media related to cars and driving. 

2002; Getting Around; Researcher: Sarah Redshaw; Funding: NSW Roads and Traffic Authority, to develop a Year 11 program for Youth and School programs.

2003-2005: Transforming Drivers; Chief Investigators: Dr Zoë Sofoulis and Associate Professor Greg Noble; Postdoctoral Fellow (APDI): Dr Sarah Redshaw. Funding: ARC Linkage Grant in partnership with NRMA (Motoring and Services).

2004: 'Young Driver Initiatives'; Researcher: Sarah Redshaw; Funding: UWS Regional and Community Grants Scheme.

Everyday Geopolitics: Nationalist Subjectivities and ANZAC Thanatourism

Red poppies on an ANZAC memorial.Researcher: Dr Emma WatertonFunding: UWS International Research Initiatives Scheme
Period: 2011-2012
Project webpage: Everyday Geopolitics: Nationalist Subjectivities and ANZAC Thanatourism

This project explores the affective experiences of memorial visitors using methodological innovations that can open up collective experiences of place and related intensities of affect. The research questions are both theoretical and methodological: First, how are affective spaces of thanatourism produced via specific practices, materials and relations? Second, how do we best capture this affective dimension?...Read more.

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Global Digital Atlas for Cultural Diversity, Pluralism and Intercultural Dialogue in Asia 

Researchers: Professor Ien AngProfessor Kay Anderson , Andre Frankovits,  Associate Professor Brett NeilsonDr Juan Francisco Salazar , Ian Johnson, Steven Hayes, Andrew Wilson, Beng Huat Chua, Daniel P. S. Goh, Eric Charles Thompson, Anjali Monteiro, K. P. Jayasankar, Shilpa Phadke Partner: UNESCO (opens in a new window) Period: 2007-2008 »  Fact sheet  (opens in a new window)(PDF, 91KB)

Handling the 'Battering Ram': Rupert Murdoch, News Corporation and the Global Contest for Dominance in Sports Television

Researcher: Professor David Rowe
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

Homebuyer preferences and developer contributions

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Urban Development Institute of Australia, University of Western Sydney
Period: 2005-2007

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Homicide and the Night-Time Economy

Researchers: Professor Stephen Tomsen, Jason Payne
Funding: Criminology Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: Homicide and the Night-Time Economy

A group of people at a bar - one is raising their drink for a toast.This project is examining the prevalence, locations and trends in homicide linked to commercial night-time leisure, problematic drinking and drug use. Recent research has focused on levels of violence and crime and its links with public socialising at night. Assaults peak on weekend nights and follow the rhythms of night socialising, in the direct confines of the night-time economy or by indirect relation to it. These crimes include serious confrontational violence in and around licensed premises, and those with a 'spill' on to other after dark locations that include public transport, street and domestic settings....Read more.

Hot Science, Global Citizens: The Agency of the Museum Sector in Climate Change Debates

Researchers: Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor Bob Hodge, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Jann Conroy, David Karoly, Sebastian Chan, Carolyn Meehan, Lynda Kelly, Graham Durant, Wayne LaBar, Richard Sandell
Partners: Powerhouse Museum (opens in a new window), Museum Victoria (opens in a new window), Australian Museum, Questacon (opens in a new window), Liberty Science Center (opens in a new window)(USA)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Period: 2008-2010
Website: Hot Science - Global Citizens (opens in a new window)

Informal Pathways to Wellbeing: Cultural Forms of Belonging, Inclusion and Engagement for Young People in Western Sydney

Researcher: Associate Professor Greg Noble
Funding: 
NSW Department of Community Services (opens in a new window),  Uniting Care Burnside , Australian Council for the Arts, Community Cultural Development NSW, Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils  (opens in a new window),  Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (opens in a new window), University of Western Sydney Children's Futures Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Scheme
 Period:  2005-2007

Intergenerational Attitudes to Cyber-Safety and Social Networking: A Living Lab

Researchers: Dr Amanda Third, Dr Philippa Collin, Natalie Bolzan, Ingrid Richardson, Lucas Walsh, Kitty Rahilly
Funding: Google Australia Pty Ltd (opens in a new window)
Period: 2011

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Law and the City: The Parramatta Justice Precinct as Civic Culture

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Partners: Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window), NSW Attorney General's Department (opens in a new window)
Funding:
University of Western Sydney Urban Research Initiatives Grant
Period: 2007

Multiculturalism Research Project (Living Diversity 2)

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Funding: Special Broadcasting Service Corporation
Period: 2005-2006

Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance

Researchers: Professor Tony Bennett, Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor Nélia Dias (opens in a new window), Dr Ben Dibley, Dr Ira Jacknis, Dr Rodney Harrison (opens in a new window), Dr Conal McCarthy (opens in a new window)
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2014
Project webpage: Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 159KB)

Michel Leiris typing the first report on the Dakar-Djibouti Mission, 13 May 1932. � 2011. Mus�e du quai Branly/Scala, Florence.This project studies early twentieth-century museums in Australia, Europe, North America and New Zealand. It investigates the new relationships between museums, anthropological fieldwork and social governance that emerged over this period. What roles did anthropology museum collections play in metropolitan public spheres? What roles did they play in relation to the governance of colonised populations? How did these roles vary across different colonial contexts? In addressing these questions the project explores their relevance to contemporary debates and practices focused on the relations between museums and Indigenous peoples....Read more.

National Water Fellowship (2010): Cross-Connections: Linking Urban Water Managers with Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Researchers

Researchers: Dr Zoë Sofoulis (Fellow), Dr Justine Humphry (Research Associate), Vibha Bhattarai Upadhyay (Research Assistant)
Partners:
National Water Commission
Funding:
National Water Commission Fellowship Program; workshop grant from Australian Academy of Humanities
Period:
2010-2011

This project investigated the Australian urban water sector's engagement with humanities, arts and social sciences [HASS] research as part of developing socially sustainable water management. Activities included developing a database and the Tributaries directory of social and cultural researchers on urban water, interviewing water managers and researchers, conducting two knowledge exchange workshops, and producing a final report for the National Water Commission's Waterlines series. The research found mismatched expectations on how HASS research can or should contribute to water management strategies; it identified the need for HASS researchers to make their work more 'translatable' into action, and suggested initiatives to help overcome the enormous disparities between research funding and infrastructure for sciences and engineering compared to social and cultural research on water.

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Negotiating the Challenge of Cultural Diversity in Children's Health Care: The Australian Context

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Sharon Chalmers, Jan Mason, Astrid Perry, Les White, Bruce Lord, John Eastwood, Mr SK Choucair
Partners/Funding: Multicultural Health Unit, South East Sydney, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (opens in a new window), Children's Hospital at Westmead (opens in a new window), Division of Population Health, South West (opens in a new window), NSW Department of Health (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2004-2007

NSW Healthy Children Initiative: Social Marketing to Young People 

Researchers: Dr Philippa Collin, Suzan Burton, Kathy Tannous, Ann Dadich
Funding: Health Administration Corporation
Period: 2011-2012 (phase 1)

Open Cities: Urban Citizenship in Sydney and Berlin

Researchers: Fiona Allon, Professor Kay Anderson, Professor Ien Ang, Justine Lloyd, Russell West-Pavlov, Mark Stein
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Partner: Free University of Berlin (opens in a new window), Germany
Period: 2006-2007

'Parramatta Stories': Values Based Community Development

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Dr Russell Staiff, Polladach Theerapapisit
Funding: University of Western Sydney Research Grant
Partner: Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

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Picturing Antarctica: Emerging Agendas for Antarctic Cultural Research

A person walking in the distance across the snow. The sun glows in the background. Image by Pedro Niada (April 2011).Researcher: Dr Juan Francisco Salazar
Funding: UWS Research Grant Scheme
Period: 2010-2011
Website: Picturing Antarctica (opens in a new window)

This research project looks at Antarctica as a 'cultural site' and investigates cultural perceptions and the social construction of Antarctica in the national imaginary of Australia and Chile. One of its main aims is to advance contemporary cultural understandings of Antarctica through an analysis of public perceptions and opinions.

The project is designed as an interdisciplinary, multi-method and multi-sited research and involves a series of specific and practice-based research projects:

  • An international survey of cultural values and perceptions in Australia and Chile.
  • A digital ethnography of Villa Las Estrellas, a township in Chilean Antarctic Territory which also includes the development of digital storytelling workshops at the local school.
  • A transmedia documentary film project that inquires about the future of Antarctica.
  • A science-arts collaborative project on Antarctic culture/nature data ecologies and cultural mapping.

Promoting Young People's Citizenship in a Complex World

Researchers: Professor James Arvanitakis, Professor Bob Hodge
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2012-2014
Project webpage: Promoting Young People's Citizenship in a Complex World

A group of young people walking together.This project aims to promote empowerment and agency to young Australians by developing the concept and practice of 'active citizenship'. This is done by confronting the emerging sense of disempowerment and alienation that many young people feel by developing ongoing work with a cross section of groups that are an important part of the civic landscape. 'Many young Australians are feeling an emerging sense of disempowerment and alienation', says Professor Arvanitakis....Read more.

Private Neighbourhoods

Researcher: Professor Deborah Stevenson
Funding: University of Western Sydney
Period: 2010-2011

Putting Humanities to Work in a Chaotic World: Dynamic Interdisciplinarity and Community Engagement

Researcher: Professor Bob Hodge
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2007-2009

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Reassessing Multicultural Education

Researchers: Dr Megan Watkins, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Partner: NSW Department of Education (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008-2010
Project webpage: Reassessing Multicultural Education

This project explores approaches to multicultural education in NSW government schools. It has become clear that multicultural education is in something of a crisis in Australia, and across the world. Some of the assumptions made about cultural diversity that formed the basis of multicultural education programs in the 1970s may no longer be appropriate. Diversity has become more diverse, shaped by intergenerational change, intermarriage and the different ways ethnic groups have accepted or rejected other cultural practices and beliefs. Students may claim three or four different cultural and linguistic heritages, and this makes it difficult to know what these students need, and how to provide it....Read more.

Reconceptualising Heritage Collections: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Museum Collections and Documentation

Researchers: Dr Fiona Cameron, Professor E A Edmonds, Professor S R Garton, Mr KS Sumption
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Powerhouse Museum (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

Rethinking Multiculturalism/Reassessing Multicultural Education 

Researchers: Associate Professor Megan WatkinsProfessor Greg Noble, Kevin Dunn, Nell Lynes, Amanda Bourke, Robyn Mamouney
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Period: 2011-2013
Website: Rethinking Multiculturalism/Reassessing Multicultural Education (opens in a new window)
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 94KB)

A group of young children in school uniforms standing together.This project aims to shed light on the challenges posed by increasing cultural complexity in schools and their communities. It is examining approaches to multiculturalism in NSW government schools in urban and rural areas and how these link to the role of education in promoting social inclusion. The project explores the relation between perceptions of difference that shape teaching practice and the rationales of multicultural programs through an analysis of policy discourse, a statewide survey of teachers and focus groups with teachers, parents and students. These will then inform professional learning for teachers and action research projects in schools developing innovative approaches to meeting the needs of culturally diverse communities and improving teacher knowledge.

Shanghai Expo

Looking down on a crowd of people at the Shanghai Expo.Lead Researcher: Dr Tim Winter
Research Team: Professor Ien Ang, Associate Professor Hart Cohen, Scott East, Hilary Hongjin He, Rob Leggo, Sally Leggo, Cameron McAuliffe, Associate Professor Brett Neilson, Willem Paling, Professor David Rowe , Louise Ryan, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar, Dr Tim Winter
Period: 2010

In 2010 the city of Shanghai hosted the largest, most spectacular and most expensive World's Fair ever. The Shanghai Expo attracted a staggering 73 million visitors, ensuring China and the host city remained in the global spotlight for the six-month duration of the event. Costing around 45 billion dollars and with its theme of Better City, Better Life, the Expo was held in a country experiencing a level of urban growth unparalleled in history. With more than half of the world's population now living in cities, many of which face uncertain futures, this mega event confronted the multitude of challenges now converging on the all-pervasive notion of 'sustainability'. To this end, 190 countries, more than 50 non-governmental organisations, and a variety of multi-national institutions involved in urban governance addressed such issues.

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Smart Engagement with Asia

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Dr Yasmin Tambiah, Dr Phillip Mar
Funding: Australian Academy of the Humanities (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2015

The depth of Australia's linguistic and inter-cultural competence will be a determining factor in the future success of developments in innovation, science and technology, research capacity, international mobility, trade relations and economic competitiveness. In the medium to longer term, the Asia Pacific region will be a principal focus, presenting major challenges and opportunities economically, socially and culturally, for our national security interests. The project, which is part of the Australian Council of Learned Academies' (opens in a new window)Securing Australia's Future program, examines how language, research and culture can be leveraged as vehicles for Australia's engagement with Asia. The final report, entitled Smart Engagement with Asia: Leveraging Language, Research and Culture, was launched by Professor Ian Chubb, Australia's Chief Scientist, in Melbourne in June 2015. Members of the Expert Working Group are: Professor Ien Ang (Chair), Professor Chennupati Jagadish (Deputy Chair), Professor Kent Anderson, Professor john fitzgerald, Professor Krishna Sen and Professor Mark Wainwright.  

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Struggling for Possession: The Control and Use of Online Media Sport

A brown rugby ball sitting on top of a white keyboard.Researchers: Professor David Rowe , Brett Hutchins
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2008-2011
Project webpage: Struggling for Possession: The Control and Use of Online Media Sport

This project is exploring media ownership and sports coverage using digital outlets. Sport is immensely popular in many media forms, and has been dominated by broadcast television for over three decades. But when sport coverage is presented online, who owns it and who has a right to access it? Recent disputes over ownership of online sport content demonstrate its pivotal role in both media and sport development. Many questions regarding private ownership by media companies, and citizens' rights to access sport in new media environments, are still to be effectively answered....Read more.

"Sweet Tonic" - Qualitative Research Proposal

Researcher: Elaine Lally
Partners: Campbelltown Arts Centre, Musica Viva Australia (opens in a new window)
Period: 2008
Project webpage: "Sweet Tonic" - Qualitative Research Proposal

This project explores the health and well-being benefits for participation in musical activities for older Australians. As Australia ages and demand for health and aging services grows, it is vital that the cultural sector engages with older citizens and their concerns. The "Sweet Tonic: Music for Life" program of singing workshops, delivered by Musica Viva Australia in participation with Campbelltown Arts Centre and the Australia Council for the Arts, is one such program. It aims to show that participation in singing and music training has demonstrable health and well-being benefits. This research project will study the "Sweet Tonic" workshops and attempt to identify the positive physical, mental, social and cultural outcomes of the "Sweet Tonic" music-based community cultural development initiative....Read more.

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Sydney's Chinatown in the Asian Century: From Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Professor Donald McNeill, Professor Kay Anderson, Steven Hillier
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Linkage Project
Partner: City of Sydney Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2012-2015
Project webpage: Sydney's Chinatown in the Asian Century: From Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub
» Research report (opens in a new window)(PDF, 4.28MB)
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 196KB)

Sydney Chinatown Dixon Street Entrance. Photographer: John Marmaras. Source: City of Sydney.The project examines the role of Sydney's Chinatown as a bridge in supporting economic and cultural links between Australia and Asia, and the activities undertaken by the City of Sydney to enhance those links in the era of rapid globalisation and rising Chinese power. 'Chinatowns are a legacy of the early 20th century, when they were typically conceived as alien enclaves of the East in the West,' says Professor Ang....Read more.

Photograph by John Marmaras. Source: City of Sydney.

The Art of Engagement: Exploring a Contemporary Arts - Business Collaboration 

Researchers: Elaine Lally, Professor Ien Ang, Professor Kay Anderson, Elizabeth Macgregor
Partners and Funding: Museum of Contemporary Art (opens in a new window), Penrith Regional Gallery (opens in a new window), Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (opens in a new window), Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2006-2008

The Changing Rights to Family Life in Australia: Biomedicine and Legal Governance in Globalisation

Note: Dr Sonja van Wichelen left ICS for The University of Sydney in January 2015.

Researcher: Dr Sonja van Wichelen
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Period: 2014-2017
Project webpage: The Changing Rights to Family Life in Australia: Biomedicine and Legal Governance in Globalisation
» Fact sheet (opens in a new window)(PDF, 165KB)

Hand holding a transparent cap with cells in side

This project investigates the impact of globalisation and biomedicine on the legal governance of family life in Australia by comparatively analysing transnational surrogacy arrangements and family reunification in immigration. It will improve public and legal understanding of the changing paradigms of family life in an era of globalisation.... Read more .

The City After Dark: Cultural Planning and Governance of the 'Night-time Economy' in Parramatta

Researchers: Professor David RoweProfessor Deborah StevensonProfessor Stephen Tomsen
Partner: 
Parramatta City Council (opens in a new window)
Funding Body: 
University of Western Sydney Urban Research Initiatives Grant
Period: 
2007

The City After Dark: The Governance and Lived Experience of Urban Night-Time Culture

A shadow of a man in a dark street.Researchers: Professor David Rowe, Professor Deborah Stevenson , Professor Stephen Tomsen
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2008-2011
Project webpage: The City after Dark: The Governance and Lived Experience of Urban Night-Time Culture

The stimulation of a night-time economy can deliver great cultural, social and economic benefits to Australian cities, or result in social disruption and disputation, assaults, and serious injuries that drain criminal justice and health resources. The promotion and regulation of the city at night is amongst the most important issues facing communities, private enterprise and governments around the globe....Read more.

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The Cultural Research Network

Researchers: Associate Professor Greg Noble, Graeme Turner, Dr Zoë Sofoulis, Professor Kay Anderson, Professor Ien Ang
Funding: Australian Research Council Research Networks
Period: 2005-2010

The Humanities beyond Humanism: Race, Nature and the Human in Australia from Enlightenment to Federation

Researcher: Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2005-2007

The Just-in-Time Self: Young Men, Skill and Narratives of Aspiration in the New Economy

A close-up portrait of a young man.Researchers: Dr George Morgan, Associate Professor Greg Noble
Funding:
Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2009-2011
Project webpage: The Just-in-Time Self: Young Men, Skill and Narratives of Aspiration in the New Economy

Historically, working class men developed their skills on-the-job in stable workplace communities. With the decline in trade and manufacturing employment, young people are told they must be flexible, individualistic and ready to retrain in response to technological change. Many young men, whose vocational inclinations are formed by Fordist models of masculinity, are unable to adapt to these post-Fordist pressures and suffer unemployment as a result. This project looked at the participation of three groups of men of different ethnic backgrounds in community cultural projects, at how skills are taught and learned in these settings and whether their experiences shape the emergence of new occupational identities and narratives of aspiration....Read more.

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The Role of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Transformation Societies

A black and white photo of a canon and barbed wire in a field.Researcher: Dr Tim Winter
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2010-2013
Project webpage: The Role of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Transformation Societies

Since the Cold War, there have been a rising number of conflicts around the world. War and conflict almost always involve destruction and devastation on a human and social scale. With much attention focused on the political and economic aspects of reconstruction, the cultural damage can often be neglected. Moreover, given that it is not only politics that impact how a society rebuilds itself, this research brings into focus the often neglected cultural challenges and the role of cultural heritage in the rebuilding process....Read more.

The Special Broadcasting Service and Australian Cultural Democracy Evolution, uses and innovation

Researchers: Professor Ien Ang, Gay Hawkins, Julie Eisenberg
Funding: Special Broadcasting Service Corporation
Period: 2004-2008

Theorising the Entangled Relationships between World Heritage places, local people visitors and industry: a case study in Luang Prabang, Laos PDR

Researchers: Associate Professor Robyn Bushell, Dr Russell Staiff
Funding:
UWS (International Research Grants Initiatives Grants)
Period: 2009-2010

This project examined the socio-cultural and political dynamics of everyday life in Luang Prabang Laos, where the global and the local are in constant interplay and tension through the economic forces of  tourism and international institutional presences as a UNESCO World Heritage town. The research examined Luang Prabang as a complex, dynamic and complicated 'cultural system' to better understand the many entangled relationships: between economy, local stakeholders, cultural production and the ritual geographies of place, tangible and intangible heritage values. The research sought to use this to produce a more nuanced understanding of  the potential and the challenges created by tourism in a small  World Heritage destination. The research is ongoing with numerous publications, the development of an ARC Discovery application.

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Universal Design and Cultural Context: Accessibility, Diversity and Recreational Space in Penrith

Researchers: Dr Zoë Sofoulis, Professor-Emeritus Helen Armstrong, Michael Bounds, Abby Lopes, Tara Andrews
Funding: University of Western Sydney Research Partnerships Program
Partner: Penrith City Council (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

Urban Cultural Economics: Landscapes and Life in Sydney and New York

Researchers: Dr George Morgan, Professor Kay Anderson
Funding: University of Western Sydney International Research Initiatives Grant
Partner: City University of New York, USA (opens in a new window)
Period: 2007

Violence and Disengagement from Violence in Young Men's Lives

Researchers: Professor Stephen Tomsen, Professor David Gadd
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2012-2016
Project webpage: Violence and Disengagement from Violence in Young Men's Lives

A close-up photo of a young man's hand pulling a knife out of his pocket.This project will study the significance of victimisation, perpetration and the watching of violence and images of violence, among young Australian men. It will explore the underlying links with masculine identity and have practical applications for developing an understanding of the unknown aspects of disengagement from involvements in violence. 'Extensive male violence is a problematic but still poorly understood social and cultural phenomenon', explains Professor Tomsen....Read more.

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World War One Refugees in Austria-Hungary and the International Community, 1914-1923

Researcher: Dr Julie Thorpe
Funding: Australian Research Council (opens in a new window), Discovery Project
Period: 2011-2013
Project webpage: World War One Refugees in Austria-Hungary and the International Community, 1914-1923

A map showing Austria and Hungary.

This project will examine how WWI refugee movements have contributed to the displacement of national communities and European states. The research is divided into two main parts: examining the situation in Austria-Hungary during WWI; and exploring how the League of Nations High Commission for Refugees assisted refugees with their resettlement after the war....Read more.

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Young Aboriginal Men, Informed Learning and the New Economy in Redfern Waterloo

Researcher: Dr George Morgan
Partner/ Funding:
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (opens in a new window)(AIATSIS)
Period: 2008-2009
Project webpage: Young Aboriginal Men, Informal Learning and the 'New Economy' in Redfern, Waterloo

This project is looking at whether informal training programs for young indigenous men can lead to the development of skills suitable for employment. Many young indigenous men in the Redfern Waterloo area in Sydney lack formal job qualifications and have grown up in households characterised by long-term unemployment. They have not developed the vocational ambitions and work habits required to build careers and they have little enthusiasm for post-school formal education, having often been alienated from the competitive world of work and education in the past....Read more.

Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre

Researchers: Associate Professor Amanda Third, Dr Philippa Collin, Professor Bob Hodge
Funding: Commonwealth Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Period: 2011-2016
Project webpage: Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre

A young man stands against a brick wall with his hands in his pockets. His face is not visible.

The Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre (opens in a new window)(Young and Well CRC) will conduct research to understand the role of online and networked media for improving the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 12 to 25. The Young and Well CRC brings together young people with researchers, practitioners and innovators from more than 70 organisations, from across the not-for-profit, academic, government and corporate sectors to conduct research which helps us better understand how technologies can be used to ensure that all young Australians are safe, happy healthy and resilient.

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