Conversations for a Future/City

Conversations for the Future/City is a series of three events addressing important issues facing the futures of cities today:


Playground Politics and the Migrant Experience Today

Thursday 18 May 2017

Migration patterns have changed in recent decades, but not in the ways frequently presented in the media or in conversations over dinner. Harsh distinctions have been drawn between the refugee and the migrant in sensationalist media headlines and government policy which are often far-removed from people's lived experiences. As a result, migrants and their families are left navigating the gaps, often in communities increasingly unsupported by government services. But communities have stepped up in extraordinary and innovative ways.

Join us for a lively conversation with Dr Shanthi Robertson (Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society) and Dorothy Hoddinott (Principal, Holroyd High School and 2014 winner of the Human Rights medal) to discuss the beauty and complexity of Australian migration experiences from the schoolyard to the university.

Event Details

Time: 5.30pm for a 6pm start. Event concludes at 8pm. Refreshments and finger food provided.
Venue: Level 9, Western Sydney University Parramatta City Campus, 1PSQ, 169 Macquarie Street, Parramatta
RSVP on Eventbrite (opens in a new window)

A photo of two children on swings against a blue sky.

Speakers

Profile photo of Shanthi RobertsonDr Shanthi Robertson is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Shanthi was awarded her PhD in International Studies from RMIT University in 2009. She worked as a lecturer in Global Studies and researcher at the Globalism Research Centre at RMIT University until she joined the Institute in 2013. Her research interests are broadly around the social and cultural consequences of globalisation, with a specific focus on transnational migration, citizenship, multiculturalism and urban social change within the Asia-Pacific region. Shanthi is currently working on an Australian Research Council funded project on temporality, mobility and Asian temporary migration to Australia.

Profile photo of Dorothy HoddinottDorothy Hoddinott was awarded the 2014 Australian Human Rights Medallist, and has been Principal of Holroyd High School since 1995, where 65% of students are in the lowest SES quartile. She is a strong, fearless advocate for the human rights of young people, particularly those of young refugees and asylum seekers. In 2002, she established the Friends of Zainab scholarship trust to support the education of young refugees and asylum seekers. Dorothy was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2008, and in 2014, was awarded an Honorary D. Litt from Western Sydney. She has been a Fellow of Senate of the University of Sydney since 2010 and Pro-Chancellor of the University since 2015.

Photo: 'Swinging in the Fall' (opens in a new window) by David D, Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License (opens in a new window)

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Can We Afford Not to Build Liveable Cities?

Thursday 25 May 2017

Affordable housing for key workers is essential to the functioning of liveable cities. But the life of a city is more than the sum of its instrumental parts. Recently, public debate about housing has been increasingly dominated by the language of assets and markets; but what other forms of value does the house hold?

To discuss the merits of affordable housing and how we can achieve it, join us for a lively conversation with Dr Louise Crabtree (Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society) and Lucy Burgmann (State Manager NSW, Community Housing Ltd).

Event Details

Time: 5.30pm for a 6pm start. Event concludes at 8pm. Refreshments and finger food provided.
Venue: Level 9, Western Sydney University Parramatta City Campus, 1PSQ, 169 Macquarie Street, Parramatta
RSVP on Eventbrite (opens in a new window)

A photo of pair of legs standing against a brick wall. In front a piece of cardboard reads 'Everyone should have a home' with a drawing of a house.

Speakers

Profile photo of Louise CrabtreeDr Louise Crabtree is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University where she is also the Institute's Director of Engagement. Louise's work focuses on urban sustainability and housing affordability, particularly how resilience and property are theorised and enacted, and often utilises participatory research methods. Her recent and ongoing projects focus on two practical areas funded by a series of competitive research grants — community land trusts and participatory mapping methodologies. Both are being used to simultaneously foster social innovation and equity outcomes on the ground, and explore and build theory on multi-stakeholder governance, decolonisation, property law, resilience and citizenship. Louise's work on resilience and governance in community housing was the basis for her receipt of the inaugural Housing Minister's Award for Early Career Researchers in 2009; in announcing the award, the Hon. Tanya Plibersek described the work as 'crucial'.

Profile photo of Lucy BurgmannLucy Burgmann is a public policy and organisational strategy expert, with a wealth of experience in fields including treasury, education, infrastructure planning and healthcare. In particular, Lucy has significant experience assisting the growth and development of social and affordable housing. Lucy joined CHL as State Manager NSW in 2016, from Elton Consulting where she was Housing Practice Lead. Her previous roles in the housing field include: CEO of the NSW Federation of Housing Associations, the peak body for community housing providers; Chairperson of the Community Housing Federation of Australia; and Manager of Government and Community Relations, Affordable Housing Solutions.

Photo: '19th Jan: Shelter' (opens in a new window)by scribbletaylor, Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License (opens in a new window)

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Smart Cities Are a No-brainer

Thursday 1 June 2017

Cities everywhere have been jumping on the 'smart city' bandwagon. But it is unclear what this actually means and where it is taking us. To expand on the terrain and to unpack the buzzwords, join us for a lively conversation with Dr Sarah Barns (Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society) and Kati Westlake (Senior Manager, Urban Design, Sydney Metro, Transport for NSW).

Event Details

Time: 5.30pm for a 6pm start. Event concludes at 8pm. Refreshments and finger foods provided.
Venue: Level 9, Western Sydney University Parramatta City Campus, 1PSQ, 169 Macquarie Street, Parramatta
RSVP on Eventbrite (opens in a new window)

A photo of an empty parking lot against a navy building. An empty yellow trailer sits in the lot.

Speakers

Profile photo of Sarah BarnsDr Sarah Barns is a Research Fellow based at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Her current research addresses the governance and technology frameworks needed to support effective urban data programs. Sarah is also a digital producer and strategist whose work focuses on the disruptive potentials of digital transformation on cities and place-making. She currently supports CSIRO / data61 Future Cities program development on data-driven city indicator development, and has established digital place-making studio Esem Projects. She brings to her work on digital cities extensive experience as a producer and strategist working across the digital creative industries, and a passion for cities that build resilient communities and support future generations.

Profile photo of Kati WestlakeKati Westlake is an expert urban designer and passionate advocate for the role of design thinking, process and action to transform cities. Currently Senior Manager Urban Design Sydney Metro at Transport for NSW, Kati was previously managing a dynamic urban design team at Parramatta City Council where she led the Design Parramatta project (opens in a new window), an initiative involving 16 multidisciplinary teams designed to catalyse urban renewal for Parramatta City. Kati has a strong belief in the public domain as the primary place of public and cultural engagement, and has a keen interest in increasing community engagement with architecture and urban design.

Photo: 's2art' (opens in a new window)by ode 2 smart 2, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License (opens in a new window)

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