2016 Three Minute Thesis

 

Three minutes to showcase your research with one slide only.

The Three Minute Thesis round for 2016 was held at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment on Thursday June 30th 2016.

With 28 presentations over a wide range of topics, the Three Minute Thesis round is an excellent opportunity to learn insights and explanations from many of the students at HIE.


Winner and People's Choice - Bronwen Roy

The panel was pleased to award the First Prize to Bronwen Roy for her talk titled "Food For Thought! Viral diseases of honeybees, a concern for our native bees".

Bronwen's talk was also independently decided as the favourite under the People's Choice Category, thereby awarding Bronwen the People's Choice Award as well.

Bronwen Roy's 3MT Slide


Runner Up Prize - Johanna Wong

The Runner Up Prize was awarded to Johanna Wong for her talk "What does the tree say? Decoding tree's hidden messages to the fungal friends and enemies."

Johanna Wong's 3MT Slide

The University's 3MT round will be held on Friday, 5 August 2016 from 10.30am - 12.30pm at The Playhouse (Building D), Kingswood Campus.

Full List Of Presentations

9.40

Yagiz Alagoz

Discovering the underlying mechanisms of how plants sense the changes in the environment

9.44

Eric Brenya

Elucidating Mechanical Stimulation; an epigenetic phenomenon of plant stress acclimation and transgenerational inheritance

9.48

Laura Castaneda Gomez

Below-ground eaters: The role of fungal plant partners on climate change

9.52

Sachin Chavan

Australia's Farming Future: Can we grow enough wheat to feed growing population?

9.56

Jeffrey Chieppa

DroughtNet: Extreme drought in grasslands

10.00

Danielle Creek

Living With Drought: Adaptive Responses Of Eucalyptus Species To Water Deficit

10.04

Chathurika Daulagala

Rhizobia : Mini fertilizer- factories in soil

10.08

Brendan Delroy

The War on Crops: Understanding the Enemy

10.12

Coline Deveautour

Fungal fashion and climate change: is melanin the new black?

10.16

Namraj Dhami

Rising CO2: Can we obtain enough dietary nutrients? 

11.04

Nicola Hanrahan

[via Skype] - The acoustic ecology of the ghost bat (Macroderma gigas)

11.08

Katie Howard

[via Skype] – Out-foxing Introduced Predators in Australia

11.12

Patricia Gilarte Padilla

What a Worm-derful Life!

11.16

Walter Israel

Improving crops by understanding water use efficiency in grasses

11.20

Vanya Jha

Fox ecology and species interactions: from Sydney Harbour to the Blue Mountains

11.24

Dushan Kumarathunge

How will Australian Eucalypt forests cope with climate warming

11.28

Jim Yang

Predicting leaf area index of Australia

11.32

Elle McDonald

Does resting energy expenditure predict reproductive output?

11.36

Tatiana Mondragon Cortes

Bioclimatic distribution of Eucalyptus and implications for fine surface fuels under current and future climates

11.40

Robert Mueller

Living in the dark down-under: remarkable Platypodinae of Australia and their microbial associates

11.44

Juan Pineiro Nevado

Getting to the root of the issue: below ground plant responses to elevated CO2

11.48

Rohan Riley

A Salty Situation: How understanding mycorrhizal communities can improve our predictions of plant productivity in the face of global change

1:04

Julius Sagun

[via Skype] - What limits sunlight conversion into crop yield? Lessons from native C4 grasses

1.08

Bronwen Roy

Food for thought! Viral diseases of honeybees, a concern for our native bees

1.12

Julia Ryeland

Extra-pair paternity in the Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

1.16

Johanna Wong

What does the tree say? Decoding tree's hidden messages to the fungal friends and enemies

1.20

Deane Woruba

Bringing "sexy" back to Queensland fruit fly

2.00pm

Wrap Up and Prize Presentations