Admission and Unit Information - Bachelor of Creative Industries

Admission

Students are admitted on the basis of their ATAR score.

Applications from Australian and New Zealand citizens and holders of permanent resident visas must be made via the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC). Use the links below to apply via UAC or Western Sydney University. Applications made directly to Western Sydney do not have an application fee.

Applicants who have undertaken studies overseas may have to provide proof of proficiency in English. Local and International applicants who are applying through the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) will find details of minimum English proficiency requirements and acceptable proof on the UAC website. Local applicants applying directly to the University should also use the information provided on the UAC website.

http://www.uac.edu.au/

https://westernsydney.uac.edu.au/ws/

International applicants must apply directly to the Western Sydney University via the International Office.

International students applying to The University through the International Office can find details of minimum English proficiency requirements and acceptable proof on their website.

International Office

Overseas qualifications must be deemed by the Australian Education International - National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR) to be equivalent to Australian qualifications in order to be considered by UAC and Western Sydney University.

Applicants wishing to pursue a specialisation in Music will be selected by one of two methods

EITHER

1. an interview/audition in which personal aptitude, professional experience and educational qualifications are taken into consideration.

After applicants have applied to UAC they are required to book an interview/audition and download a questionnaire at this University's online audition booking system.

Or

2. a written application that demonstrates that the applicant has attained a pass standard (minimum) of 6th Grade Performance (Instrument or voice) through the AMEB or equivalent (e.g. Trinity College) AND a pass standard (minimum) of 4th Grade musicianship and/or theory through the AMEB or equivalent (e.g. Trinity College).

After applicants have applied to UAC they are required to download a questionnaire at this University's online site, complete the questionnaire and then scan it and upload it to this University's online site together with the supporting documentation i.e. certificates demonstrating the applicant’s level of achievement in performance and musicianship and/or music theory.

Alternate Entry Pathway

The exceptional merit pathway (EMP) will offer those students who demonstrate an aptitude and ability in the creative industries area that is assessed as meeting the Course Learning Outcomes, to receive either a direct or conditional offer. Students will be required to present a portfolio, complete an audition, take part in at least one workshop and/or submit a written assessment, in addition to participating in an interview, during one of a series of on-campus Young Creatives events. Successful completion of the EMP requirements will result in either a direct or conditional entry offer for the following year. Though the direct offer is a non-ATAR pathway, eligibility to accept the direct offer will remain contingent on the successful completion of the HSC. Students who participate in this program but do not qualify for a direct offer would be eligible for a conditional offer, with the additional requirement of an ATAR of 55+.

Course Structure

Qualification for this award requires the successful completion of 240 credit points including the units listed in the recommended sequence below.

Students must complete

  • Twelve compulsory core units
  • Two units from the Introduction to Major units pool
  • One Major or two Sub-majors
  • Note: The recommended sequence is subject to variation based on the students nominated specialisation.

    For students undertaking Law and the Creative Industries as their major, please refer to the Law and the Creative Industries Major sequence below.

    Introduction to Major units pool

    Introduction to Journalism

    This unit introduces students to the fields of journalism and new media, covering the concepts of news values and news research for target audiences. It looks at the role of the journalist and the professional skills of news gathering and news writing. The subject also considers the legal and ethical obstacles and obligations faced by journalists operating in an environment of fast paced communication. The methodologies underlying professional practice as well as delivering news with speed for multimedia platforms are central to this unit.

    Advertising: An Introduction

    In this unit students gain a grounding in the key areas of advertising and the steps in the advertising process, viz. research, strategy, creative (copywriting & art direction), production, account service, media planning and marketing communication. Students are also introduced to the issues surrounding advertising and its role in society.

    Public Relations Theory and Practice

    This unit introduces the student to the theory and research that serves as the foundation of the practice of public relations. The unit surveys the history of the discipline, the theories on which the discipline is based, and current models of practice. The unit focuses on understanding how to research and analyse the opinions of organisational publics in order to develop mutually beneficial relationships with those publics. The contemporary practice of public relations requires an understanding of a broad range of social science theory and research and the ability to incorporate that knowledge in the solution of public relations problems.

    Introduction to Literary Studies

    This unit involves the close reading of literary texts to explore concepts about meaning-making including the use of language, narrative form, and issues of genre. The unit asks questions about the role and function of literature. For example: is literature's purpose to entertain readers, to provide them with emotional release, to represent the world, or to allow people to make meaning from their experience? The primary texts span three genres - fiction, poetry and drama. Students will learn about the different ways in which these literary forms are constructed and the contrasting ways in which they represent reality.

    Creative Writing: The Imaginative Life

    How do we begin as creative writers? What is an imaginative life? This is the first of two Level 1 foundation units in the Creative Writing Major. Students will be oriented in the practice and knowledge of creative writing. They will learn techniques and strategies for becoming an effective creative writer, while studying writing as a mode of imaginative thinking and response. The unit involves face to face lectures and creative writing workshops overseen by experienced and widely-published writers, critics and publishers from the Writing and Society Research Centre and the School of HCA. No previous creative writing experience is necessary.

    Foundations of Media Arts and Production

    This unit explores creative and independent media arts practices across moving image, audio and participatory forms, and introduces students to fundamental principles of sound and screen production. The unit maps theoretical and practical connections between the creation and study of images and sound across media formats through an integrated theory/practice programme focused on the processes through which media artefacts are created. Students learn how to analyse and critically evaluate screen media and also to plan and make simple short works of their own. It introduces students to relevant media arts histories and contexts (with a focus on cinema) in addition to a range of technologies, media practices and production techniques.

    Everyday Life

    This unit introduces students to key themes and issues in the study of everyday life. It draws on different disciplinary areas - especially anthropology, sociology and cultural studies - and different theoretical and methodological perspectives to examine the ways cultural practices and meanings are used to shape human identities and societies in everyday life. It will focus on rituals and routines in the different spaces of everyday life, and the ways these contribute to the production of local worlds and the key cultural categories that give meaning to these worlds. It will include a focus on how we research everyday life.

    Introduction to Sound Technologies

    In 2018 this unit replaced by 102558 - Music Production. This unit is the first of two foundation level units providing a practical overview of the basic concepts and applications of electronic and digital sound technology in current music and media arts practice. Areas to be examined include the fundamentals of acoustics, elementary microphone, recording and mixing techniques, and an introduction MIDI systems and sequencing. Technical concepts are contextualised within a survey of contemporary electroacoustic music and sonic arts practice.

    Organisational Behaviour

    Organisational Behaviour examines individual, group and organisational behaviours and the influence these have on each other. This unit is based on developing skills that can help you navigate through these processes and behaviours. The focus is on participation, to guide students to both reflect on and develop their own skills to become better managers, as well as employees.

    Fundamentals of Australian Law

    This unit provides students with the fundamental legal skills required to succeed in the study and practice of law. Students will be introduced to the Australian legal system, legal study skills, how law is made, how cases and statute interact, the Australian court hierarchies, legal research, legal referencing, case analysis skills, statutory interpretation skills, an introduction to legal ethics and justice, and an introduction to the impact of the Australian legal system on Australian First Peoples.

    Web and Time-based Design

    Students will develop fundamental computer software skills and design understandings appropriate to using major web and time based design technologies such as HTML and CSS. They will develop a working understanding of production literacies for online design and time-based design. Students will engage in practical studies of web authoring. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the roles, functions and features of key screen based technologies, design production context for online delivery, current industry best practices, and a working understanding of the responsibilities inherent in the digital design and production process.

    Image Design

    Image Design introduces students to the use of signification and metaphor in the visual communication of verbal and written concepts. The process of creating and evaluating images is explored through the principles of visual organization, and the experience of image making through photographic and illustrative methods, techniques and mediums.

    Majors

    Advertising

    Creative Writing

    Cultural and Social Analysis

    Digital Cultures

    English

    Enterprise Innovation

    Graphic Design

    Journalism

    Law and the Creative Industries

    Media Arts Production

    Music

    Public Relations

    Sub-majors

    Advertising

    Creative Writing

    Cultural and Social Analysis

    Digital Cultures

    English

    Graphic Design

    Journalism

    Media Arts Production

    Public Relations

    Music Production Studies

    Please note: SM1127 Music Production Studies replaces SM1039 Sound Technology Studies from 2018.

    Recommended Sequence

    Autumn Commencement

    Full-time

    Year 1

    Autumn session

    Writing Ecologies

    This unit introduces students to a set of theories and strategies for exploring digital literacy and the way social and cultural experiences shape and inform the way we read, write and communicate. Grounded in contexts key to Communication Arts practice, the unit explores what it means to be digitally literate, the difference between newer and older reading/writing environments, and the way the digital is re-making contemporary reading/writing practices. Students will complete a range of analytical tasks that aim to build understanding of the dynamic nature of communications while further developing academic research and writing skills.

    Enterprise Law

    This is an introductory law unit designed to introduce the fundamentals of law in a commercial context. The unit introduces students to the basic principles of law and the legal system as well as examining some of the major areas of law that impact on commercial dealings. This unit examines the legal system, the way law is made and the main areas of law relevant to starting and running a business including contracts, negligence and consumer protection.

    Media Cultures and Industries

    This unit introduces students to the concept of media in terms of how it has changed, how it works and its impact on our lives and society. It builds the necessary foundation for further theoretical and practical study and understanding of the media in future years. Its approach brings practice-based research together with experiential learning and theoretical reflection. At the conclusion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a fundamental critical understanding of the media. In addition, students will have developed their digital literacy through the creation of digital creative works.

    One unit from the Introduction to Major units pool

    Spring session

    Data, Mediation, Power

    Data, Mediation, Power investigates the operation of power in contemporary digital media cultures and economy. The unit examines the primary role played by data in determining how we live in the world. This includes how we interact with the world, its people and digital artefacts, in terms of communication and meaning. The unit focuses on technologies of control and governance related to algorithmic architectures and data economies. Who benefits from data and mediation and what are the limits and possibilities of data? Ultimately, this kind of critical analysis invites us to think about what constitutes a just, democratic society and what constitutes an ethical media life.

    Enterprise Leadership

    Enterprise Leadership begins the development of the understanding of the role and function of business management and enterprise leadership concepts. Enterprise leaders need to balance a range of stakeholder perspectives in dynamic internal and external environments at local and global levels. Students are introduced to people, managerial and organisational processes designed to achieve enterprise leadership. Problem solving scenarios and experiential learning provide students with a foundation to develop personal and professional skills required to effectively manage their careers.

    Visual Storytelling

    Visual storytelling is increasingly being used in a variety of contexts including websites, magazines, advertising, business and public affairs, exhibitions and events and television, often working across a number of platforms at the same time as requiring responsive design approaches for a diversity of viewing experiences. With access to increasing amounts and types of data, professional communicators need to be able to extract meaning to connect with a variety of different audiences in creative, dynamic, and emotional ways. This Unit introduces students to story archetypes, structure and flow. It encourages metaphorical and anagogical storytelling using appropriation making reference to genre and research. This practical unit explores a range of traditional hands-on techniques and digital software commonly used across the communications sector. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their own mark and image making skills aimed at specific target audiences and communication contexts.

    One unit from the Introduction to Major units pool

    Year 2

    Autumn session

    Media Law and Ethics

    Media Law and Ethics focuses on the media and communication industries of public relations, journalism, advertising and media production, and examines issues including: the legal framework in which these creative communication industries operate, the role of ethics in decision-making in these industries, and the impact of regulation. It considers these issues in relation to their historical and philosophical contexts, and in terms of the contemporary context of digital networked media. This unit provides a foundation for professional practice in the Communication and Creative Industries key programs.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    And one elective

    Spring session

    Financing Enterprises

    Financing an enterprise plays an important role in ensuring its survival. Financing Enterprises focuses on the different types of enterprises available to start a business, financial statements issued by enterprises, key sources of finance available to small and large businesses, and how the surrounding financial and macroeconomic environments affect an enterprises performance. Participants in the unit will learn how to identify, analyse and interpret financial information using industry related database. The unit utilises problem solving and case studies so participants can understand the real world significance of finance. Successful completion of the unit equips participants with key concepts involved in financing enterprises.

    Creative TEAMS 1

    Creative TEAMS 1 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem set by the industry partner. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    Year 3

    Autumn session

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets introduces students to key concepts, business models and issues surrounding contemporary business. Students will develop an understanding of the private enterprise system and business ownership, the implications of marketing and economics on market structure together with managing innovation. Building on the foundation knowledge of the key principles of markets, students will be able to transfer this knowledge into their subsequent study of specialist areas. The unit also aims to develop students’ communication skills by working in teams to enhance their literacy proficiency and enhance their critical thinking in preparation for the more advanced units of the degree.

    Creative TEAMS 2

    Creative TEAMS 2 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners on professional projects. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop original solutions with industry partners. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    Spring session

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship will allow students to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will collaborate with an industry partner to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem as an internship placement or develop their own creative industry project.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    And one elective

    Spring (Mid-Year) Commencement

    Full-time

    Year 1

    Spring session

    Data, Mediation, Power

    Data, Mediation, Power investigates the operation of power in contemporary digital media cultures and economy. The unit examines the primary role played by data in determining how we live in the world. This includes how we interact with the world, its people and digital artefacts, in terms of communication and meaning. The unit focuses on technologies of control and governance related to algorithmic architectures and data economies. Who benefits from data and mediation and what are the limits and possibilities of data? Ultimately, this kind of critical analysis invites us to think about what constitutes a just, democratic society and what constitutes an ethical media life.

    Enterprise Leadership

    Enterprise Leadership begins the development of the understanding of the role and function of business management and enterprise leadership concepts. Enterprise leaders need to balance a range of stakeholder perspectives in dynamic internal and external environments at local and global levels. Students are introduced to people, managerial and organisational processes designed to achieve enterprise leadership. Problem solving scenarios and experiential learning provide students with a foundation to develop personal and professional skills required to effectively manage their careers.

    Visual Storytelling

    Visual storytelling is increasingly being used in a variety of contexts including websites, magazines, advertising, business and public affairs, exhibitions and events and television, often working across a number of platforms at the same time as requiring responsive design approaches for a diversity of viewing experiences. With access to increasing amounts and types of data, professional communicators need to be able to extract meaning to connect with a variety of different audiences in creative, dynamic, and emotional ways. This Unit introduces students to story archetypes, structure and flow. It encourages metaphorical and anagogical storytelling using appropriation making reference to genre and research. This practical unit explores a range of traditional hands-on techniques and digital software commonly used across the communications sector. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their own mark and image making skills aimed at specific target audiences and communication contexts.

    One unit from pool of Introduction to Major units

    Autumn session

    Writing Ecologies

    This unit introduces students to a set of theories and strategies for exploring digital literacy and the way social and cultural experiences shape and inform the way we read, write and communicate. Grounded in contexts key to Communication Arts practice, the unit explores what it means to be digitally literate, the difference between newer and older reading/writing environments, and the way the digital is re-making contemporary reading/writing practices. Students will complete a range of analytical tasks that aim to build understanding of the dynamic nature of communications while further developing academic research and writing skills.

    Enterprise Law

    This is an introductory law unit designed to introduce the fundamentals of law in a commercial context. The unit introduces students to the basic principles of law and the legal system as well as examining some of the major areas of law that impact on commercial dealings. This unit examines the legal system, the way law is made and the main areas of law relevant to starting and running a business including contracts, negligence and consumer protection.

    Media Cultures and Industries

    This unit introduces students to the concept of media in terms of how it has changed, how it works and its impact on our lives and society. It builds the necessary foundation for further theoretical and practical study and understanding of the media in future years. Its approach brings practice-based research together with experiential learning and theoretical reflection. At the conclusion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a fundamental critical understanding of the media. In addition, students will have developed their digital literacy through the creation of digital creative works.

    One unit from pool of Introduction to Major units

    Year 2

    Spring session

    Financing Enterprises

    Financing an enterprise plays an important role in ensuring its survival. Financing Enterprises focuses on the different types of enterprises available to start a business, financial statements issued by enterprises, key sources of finance available to small and large businesses, and how the surrounding financial and macroeconomic environments affect an enterprises performance. Participants in the unit will learn how to identify, analyse and interpret financial information using industry related database. The unit utilises problem solving and case studies so participants can understand the real world significance of finance. Successful completion of the unit equips participants with key concepts involved in financing enterprises.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    And one elective

    Autumn session

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets introduces students to key concepts, business models and issues surrounding contemporary business. Students will develop an understanding of the private enterprise system and business ownership, the implications of marketing and economics on market structure together with managing innovation. Building on the foundation knowledge of the key principles of markets, students will be able to transfer this knowledge into their subsequent study of specialist areas. The unit also aims to develop students’ communication skills by working in teams to enhance their literacy proficiency and enhance their critical thinking in preparation for the more advanced units of the degree.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    And one elective

    Year 3

    Spring session

    Creative TEAMS 1

    Creative TEAMS 1 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem set by the industry partner. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship will allow students to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will collaborate with an industry partner to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem as an internship placement or develop their own creative industry project.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    Autumn session

    Media Law and Ethics

    Media Law and Ethics focuses on the media and communication industries of public relations, journalism, advertising and media production, and examines issues including: the legal framework in which these creative communication industries operate, the role of ethics in decision-making in these industries, and the impact of regulation. It considers these issues in relation to their historical and philosophical contexts, and in terms of the contemporary context of digital networked media. This unit provides a foundation for professional practice in the Communication and Creative Industries key programs.

    Creative TEAMS 2

    Creative TEAMS 2 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners on professional projects. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop original solutions with industry partners. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Two units from a selected major or sub-major

    Law and the Creative Industries Major

    Please Note: Due to the progression requirements of this major, students selecting Law and the Creative Industries as their major must follow the specific recommended sequence below in order to successfully complete this specialisation. These students are also exempt from completing core unit 200909 Enterprise Law, as they must complete the alternate unit 200977 Fundamentals of Australian Law as their core unit and first Introduction to Major unit.

    This major is not available for Spring (Mid-Year) commencement

    Autumn Commencement

    Full-time

    Year 1

    Autumn session

    Writing Ecologies

    This unit introduces students to a set of theories and strategies for exploring digital literacy and the way social and cultural experiences shape and inform the way we read, write and communicate. Grounded in contexts key to Communication Arts practice, the unit explores what it means to be digitally literate, the difference between newer and older reading/writing environments, and the way the digital is re-making contemporary reading/writing practices. Students will complete a range of analytical tasks that aim to build understanding of the dynamic nature of communications while further developing academic research and writing skills.

    Media Cultures and Industries

    This unit introduces students to the concept of media in terms of how it has changed, how it works and its impact on our lives and society. It builds the necessary foundation for further theoretical and practical study and understanding of the media in future years. Its approach brings practice-based research together with experiential learning and theoretical reflection. At the conclusion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a fundamental critical understanding of the media. In addition, students will have developed their digital literacy through the creation of digital creative works.

    Fundamentals of Australian Law

    This unit provides students with the fundamental legal skills required to succeed in the study and practice of law. Students will be introduced to the Australian legal system, legal study skills, how law is made, how cases and statute interact, the Australian court hierarchies, legal research, legal referencing, case analysis skills, statutory interpretation skills, an introduction to legal ethics and justice, and an introduction to the impact of the Australian legal system on Australian First Peoples.

    Criminal Law

    This unit introduces students to the basic principles of criminal law and criminal responsibility and the criminal justice process as located in its broader social and political context.

    Spring session

    Data, Mediation, Power

    Data, Mediation, Power investigates the operation of power in contemporary digital media cultures and economy. The unit examines the primary role played by data in determining how we live in the world. This includes how we interact with the world, its people and digital artefacts, in terms of communication and meaning. The unit focuses on technologies of control and governance related to algorithmic architectures and data economies. Who benefits from data and mediation and what are the limits and possibilities of data? Ultimately, this kind of critical analysis invites us to think about what constitutes a just, democratic society and what constitutes an ethical media life.

    Visual Storytelling

    Visual storytelling is increasingly being used in a variety of contexts including websites, magazines, advertising, business and public affairs, exhibitions and events and television, often working across a number of platforms at the same time as requiring responsive design approaches for a diversity of viewing experiences. With access to increasing amounts and types of data, professional communicators need to be able to extract meaning to connect with a variety of different audiences in creative, dynamic, and emotional ways. This Unit introduces students to story archetypes, structure and flow. It encourages metaphorical and anagogical storytelling using appropriation making reference to genre and research. This practical unit explores a range of traditional hands-on techniques and digital software commonly used across the communications sector. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their own mark and image making skills aimed at specific target audiences and communication contexts.

    Legal Analysis and Critique

    The unit exposes students to the contexts that affect how law is made, some of the institutional limitations on law and justice and the impact of globalisation on law. It introduces theories about the nature and function of law in historical, political, social, economic, cultural, ethical and international contexts. The connection between race, gender, culture and law is examined within the context of the Australian legal tradition, legal history, and the impact of the Australian legal system on Australian First Peoples. The unit introduces students to the processes of critical evaluation of arguments, legal communication and logical and critical problem solving involving statutory interpretation and precedent.

    Torts Law

    The unit introduces students to the legal principles and policy of a variety of torts, defences and remedies. The unit also introduces students to the generic legal skills of case reading, analysis and note taking, statutory interpretation and legal problem solving, as well as placing the law in the wider political and social context.

    Year 2

    Autumn session

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets

    Enterprise Innovation and Markets introduces students to key concepts, business models and issues surrounding contemporary business. Students will develop an understanding of the private enterprise system and business ownership, the implications of marketing and economics on market structure together with managing innovation. Building on the foundation knowledge of the key principles of markets, students will be able to transfer this knowledge into their subsequent study of specialist areas. The unit also aims to develop students’ communication skills by working in teams to enhance their literacy proficiency and enhance their critical thinking in preparation for the more advanced units of the degree.

    Enterprise Leadership

    Enterprise Leadership begins the development of the understanding of the role and function of business management and enterprise leadership concepts. Enterprise leaders need to balance a range of stakeholder perspectives in dynamic internal and external environments at local and global levels. Students are introduced to people, managerial and organisational processes designed to achieve enterprise leadership. Problem solving scenarios and experiential learning provide students with a foundation to develop personal and professional skills required to effectively manage their careers.

    Alternative Dispute Resolution

    Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes are no longer 'alternative' but a major part of the contemporary justice system. Modern legal practice requires lawyers to negotiate settlements on behalf of clients and advise clients how to resolve disputes without litigation. Non-adversarial processes offer many benefits to parties, professionals and the community. This unit will introduce you to the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution processes and provide you with the opportunity to develop key ADR practice.

    One unit from the Introduction to Major units pool

    Spring session

    Financing Enterprises

    Financing an enterprise plays an important role in ensuring its survival. Financing Enterprises focuses on the different types of enterprises available to start a business, financial statements issued by enterprises, key sources of finance available to small and large businesses, and how the surrounding financial and macroeconomic environments affect an enterprises performance. Participants in the unit will learn how to identify, analyse and interpret financial information using industry related database. The unit utilises problem solving and case studies so participants can understand the real world significance of finance. Successful completion of the unit equips participants with key concepts involved in financing enterprises.

    Creative TEAMS 1

    Creative TEAMS 1 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem set by the industry partner. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Contracts

    Contracts covers the formation of contracts, the requirement of writing, privity of contract, contractual terms and their interpretation, breach of contract, discharge of contractual obligations and elements vitiating its formation such as misrepresentation, misleading and deceptive conduct, mistake, undue influence, unconscionability, duress and discharge. Statutory developments are also considered such as the Contracts Review Act 1980 (NSW) and the Australian Consumer Law, as are the historic and theoretical aspects of the development of the law of contract.

    And one elective

    Year 3

    Autumn session

    Media Law and Ethics

    Media Law and Ethics focuses on the media and communication industries of public relations, journalism, advertising and media production, and examines issues including: the legal framework in which these creative communication industries operate, the role of ethics in decision-making in these industries, and the impact of regulation. It considers these issues in relation to their historical and philosophical contexts, and in terms of the contemporary context of digital networked media. This unit provides a foundation for professional practice in the Communication and Creative Industries key programs.

    Creative TEAMS 2

    Creative TEAMS 2 will bring students together in interdisciplinary groups to work with Creative Industries practitioners on professional projects. Students will learn how to collaborate to develop original solutions with industry partners. Through research and planning, in relation to a set of relevant constraints: such as cultural, social, environmental, site and audience, students will develop a strategy that utilises the appropriate media, message and approach, to address the identified target audience, based on research findings.

    Media Law

    This unit examines various aspects of the laws that regulate the media. The central content of the Unit consists of defamation, contempt, privacy and surveillance and a selection of other laws impacting upon this industry. Throughout the unit we will also explore two key themes. The first is whether, as a question of policy, current legal restrictions to media freedom appropriately balance the protection of free speech with various other interests, including protection of reputation, personal privacy and the effective administration of justice. The second theme asks whether media laws that were developed to regulate traditional mass-media organisations apply to individuals who publish their own content online, particularly via social media, and, if so, whether this application is appropriately balanced. Analysis of the application of existing media law principles to a range of new technologies will be featured throughout the Unit.

    One unit from the Level 3 Law unit pool

    Spring session

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship

    Creative Industries Professional Project or Internship will allow students to work with Creative Industries practitioners in a 'real world' context. Students will collaborate with an industry partner to develop an original solution to a “wicked” problem as an internship placement or develop their own creative industry project.

    One unit from the Level 3 Law unit pool

    And two electives